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Two New First Issue Revenue Proofs

 
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Pillar Of The Community
USA
2865 Posts
Posted 01/07/2008   9:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add t360 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
These revenue proofs followed me home from the NESS Stamp Show last Sunday.



1862 R36P 10c blue Inland Exchange (left) and 1862 R36a 10c blue imperforate Inland Exchange stamp (right)



1862 R42P 20 red Inland Exchange (left) and 1862 R42a 20c red imperforate Inland Exchange stamp (right)
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Valued Member
USA
126 Posts
Posted 01/08/2008   10:57 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Metalman to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
T please forgive a novice question ,,but what characteristics indicate that these are proofs ?
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Pillar Of The Community
USA
2865 Posts
Posted 01/08/2008   11:05 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add t360 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I just posted the corresponding imperforate stamps side-by-side with the proofs above.

As trial printings to test the engraving, the proofs were printed on thick, stiff card stock without gum. The thick hard stock gave a very clean and sharp impression, just what was needed to show off the workmanship to the supervisor. The proofs never saw use and were filed away by the printer.

The actual stamps are printed on softer, thinner paper which was gummed and have a much less sharp appearance. The stamps were in use for several years and the pigments used varied over the years, so there are several shades of "red" and "blue." These stamps were issued imperforate (as shown), part perforate (with vertical perforations only) and fully perforated. The reason the stamps were not all fully perforated was simply due to lack of time available before the stamps had to be shipped, and they could not be delayed as they were an important source of tax revenue needed for the war effort.
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