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Scott # 441 Washington 1 Cent Green

 
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Valued Member
USA
126 Posts
Posted 01/28/2008   2:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Metalman to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Nice coil pair ,, VF/XF I think ?

If someone could provide a date for these I would appreciate it .



Thanks

Metalman

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Pillar Of The Community
Australia
1927 Posts
Posted 01/28/2008   5:08 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Triggersmob to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Washington 1 cent Green - 1912
If I am learning correctly from your previous post, I would grade this VF. The bottom appears to be much closer to the perforations than the top.

Nice stamps though, thanks for sharing.

Steve
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USA
2866 Posts
Posted 01/28/2008   10:33 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add t360 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Steve is correct, the original sheet version of the 1c Washington, Scott #405 (perf. 12 on all sides) was issued in February, 1912. This series of stamps, called the Washington-Franklins, is very complex however, and was was issued in several different formats.

If your coil version of the 1c Washington is indeed Scott #441, then it will measure perf. 10 horizontally. Scott #441 was printed on a flat bed press and should have a single line watermark (part of one of the letters in USPS). The stamp was released in this coil format on November 14, 1914.

Two very similiar stamps were printed on a rotary press. Rotary press stamps are printed from plates that are curved to fit around a cylinder. This curvature produces stamps which are a little bit larger in one dimension than flat bed stamps. The designs on the rotary press stamps are taller, 22.5mm, which is 1/2 mm taller than the flat plate printings which measure 22mm tall.

Rotary press coils of the 1c Washington, perf. 10 horizontally, with single line watermark, Scott #448, were released December 12, 1915. Unwatermarked rotary press coils perf. 10 horizontally, Scott #486, were released in January, 1918.

So if your stamps measure perf. 10 and are very close to 22mm tall, then they are Scott #441. If they are taller than 22mm, then they are one of the rotary press stamps, either #448 or #486, depending on if they are watermarked.
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Valued Member
USA
126 Posts
Posted 01/29/2008   2:45 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Metalman to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
What is the best way to see the water mark ?

Tom can you give me a guide to the perf measurement ?
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USA
2866 Posts
Posted 01/29/2008   10:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add t360 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
To measure perforations you need a perforation gauge. You can buy a metal one at any place that sells stamp collecting supplies, such as Amos Advantage. These seem expensive to me since I think I paid 69c for mine back in the day. Here is a free perforation gauge (in a pdf file) you can print out at the Dakshina Kannada Philatelic and Numismatic Association Web Site.

Watermarks can be seen when the stamp is placed face down in a black tray with a squirt of watermark fluid on it. Back in the old days we used benzene for detecting watermarks. This is no longer recommended because benzene is a carcinogen. Also in the old days I have seen some dealers use lighter fluid - not the BBQ kind, but the kind for refilling household cigarette lighters. This leaves a unpleasant smell, however, and I wouldn't recommend it. I think the best thing to do is to bite the bullet and buy a bottle of overpriced "safe" watermark fluid (which should last you many years) and a little black plastic tray or black ashtray. You can get watermark fluid at any dealer in stamp supplies (like Amos Advantage).
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