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20th Century US Postal Stationery 1900-1999

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Pillar Of The Community
United States
788 Posts
Posted 02/03/2014   10:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add acanalizo to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I would like to open up a space where we can discuss 20th Century
(1900-1999) United States Postal Stationery.

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Canada
3855 Posts
Posted 02/04/2014   12:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Dianne Earl to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
That's a nice one ACANALIZO. I have a few of cut pieces off postal stationary but don't collect them.

Dianne
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Don't grumble that the roses have thorns, be thankful that the thorns have roses
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Posted 02/07/2014   4:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ThomasGalloway to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I picked up one of these U379s (UPSS 1377a-14) on eBay the other day.



Neither the top flap nor the right flap had any gum/glue. And there wasn't any evidence of steaming the envelope open.

Both ungummed flaps and open ends (where the right flap is unglued) are known for may envelopes in the early 20th century. However, 1377a-14 doesn't exist with those attributes in the catalog.

Thinking I might have a new find for the catalog, I contacted the catalog editor. There were two things I had to consider, he said. First, open ends weren't authorized for production until 1910. Second, ungummed flaps and open ends never occur on the same envelope.

He suggested what I had was an error in gumming/gluing. Another envelope blank had not properly moved through the folding machine and "took the hit", as it were, when the glue was applied to my envelope.

Being an EFO collector, I was not disappointed.
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Valued Member
United States
497 Posts
Posted 02/07/2014   5:33 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jobi01 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi, Albert. Nice scan.

Thomas, I would have told you the same thing Dan told you.

Shouldn't this discussion be in the back of the book forum?
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Posted 02/07/2014   7:17 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ThomasGalloway to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
"Shouldn't this discussion be in the back of the book forum?"

Uh, Jobi-wan, just where do you think it's being discussed?
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Posted 02/07/2014   8:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
What is a book forum? My purpose is to have a section to discuss 20th Century USPS postal stationery in one section. I also creared a 21st Century USPS postal stationery for that purpose?
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United States
497 Posts
Posted 02/08/2014   5:12 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jobi01 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I oopsed, Albert. Your threads are in the right forum. Revenues, christmas seals, postal cards, stamped envelopes, among other items, are referred to as back of the book because they are listed in the back of the catalog.
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Posted 02/08/2014   5:50 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Bill, I did not realize until now you (Jobi)are the same person helping me find mint entires by UPSS numbers. You provide a nice service. I had lost the vast amount of my 60+ yr stamp collection after Hurricane Katrina flooding in our city caused by the US Corps of Engineers including a very deep US mint cut squares and entires collection. I am slowly trying to rebuild but I know I can never obtain any where near what I lost. Most I can hope for is building a solid mint 1930 entires thru todate and some of the less expensive cut squares & entires before. Thank you for taking the time and working from my lists.
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Posted 02/09/2014   4:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have a few US 20th Century postal stationery envelopes with flaps stuck to the envelope. I have heard a method to unstick envelope flaps one should use an iron set on low heat. Using the iron, gently glide over the flap that is stuck and then use a knife between the envelope and flap to lift the flap up. Guess this heats the glue? Another method suggested that can be used is to put the envelope in the freezer for about 24 hours which will help to dry out the adhesive seal. Remove from the freezer and slide a knife between the envelope and flap. Has anyone ever tried this or is there a safer method?
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Posted 02/10/2014   8:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
eHow suggests:
1
Set the iron to low heat. When the iron is warm, run the iron over the sealed envelope to warm it slightly. Insert the tip of the knife between the two layers of the envelope to separate them. Slide the knife along the edge of the envelope flap to separate the flap of the envelope.
2
Set the iron to low heat. Moisten the clean cloth slightly with water. Wring it out well. Place the damp cloth over the envelope and place the warm iron over the cloth. Leave the iron on the cloth for two seconds and remove the iron. Insert the tip of the knife between the two layers of the envelope to separate them in the same fashion as in step one. This method may work better for more stubbornly-stuck envelopes because it utilizes moisture to unstick the envelope flap.
3
Place the stuck envelope into the microwave oven. Place a mug of water in a rear corner of the microwave to add moisture to the microwave. Turn the microwave on and run it for up to 20 seconds. Remove the envelope and open the flap. It should unstick easily.
4
Place the stuck envelope into the freezer. Leave the envelope there for up to 24 hours. The extreme cold and dryness of the freezer should unstick the envelope. Remove the envelope from the freezer and insert the tip of the knife between the two layers of the envelope to separate them. The envelope should unstick easily.
Has anyone tried any of these methods?

Read more: http://www.ehow.com/how_6053209_uns...xzz2syFSw800
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Valued Member
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175 Posts
Posted 02/10/2014   11:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add eaglebub7 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
ACANALIZO, was speaking with a dealer at a stamp show last weekend in my area. We were discussing how to un-stick stamps...his recommendation was number 3. Stated not to power microwave for more than 5 seconds...problem is microwaves have a wide range of wattage so length of time will vary.
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Rest in Peace
United States
4052 Posts
Posted 02/11/2014   10:19 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
"Place the stuck envelope into the microwave oven. Place a mug of water in a rear corner of the microwave to add moisture to the microwave."

The reason to add the cup of water is not to add moisture, but to add an absorber, so that the microwave energy will not destroy the microwave. The residual water in the glued-shut envelope is tiny, and only requires a tiny amount of the total energy in the microwave to shake its little molecular bonds.

I would lay a wrung-out strip of moist cloth or paper towel over the exact areas to be glue-softened, but that's me.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
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United States
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Posted 02/11/2014   5:43 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jobi01 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have found no one technique to be successful in all cases other than a carefully monitored sweat box but too long and you got wrinkles to be ironed out. Microwave requires experimentation with a fire suppression technique handy. I have never had success with the freezer method.
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Posted 02/13/2014   5:45 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I tried all the methods we have been discussing to unstick an envelope flap. The freezer and microwave did not work at all for me. The only thing that seemed to work was to place water in a kettle, heat to boil so steam comes out of spout. I refined this by covering spout with foil and placing a small hole so steam would escape in a more controlled direction. That seemed to have worked well but it takes time not to get the envelope too wet which may require ironing
which presents other problems.
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Posted 02/14/2014   09:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ThomasGalloway to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I agree with jobi01, a sweatbox is the way to go. I also agree that monitoring is important. You want to just loosen the glue, no more.

However it seems like ikeyPikey is describing a method that mimics the sweatbox, but works faster. Maybe thru experimentation, you can get just the right amount of time/energy level and it will be repeatable. I plan to try it out on some test envelopes.

With the sweatbox you will also loosen the glue holding the side flaps. I carefully peel open the top flap, then insert a plastic rectangle into the envelope and put a weight on the envelope, leaving the flap open. You don't want to start "ironing" the flap until its gum has dried a little.

The reason for the plastic insert (paperboard would do, but any glue around the edges of the flaps might latch on to the paperboard) is to prevent creasing the edges of the envelope beyond what is expected from, say, a new envelope. I use the plastic "cutting boards" available in kitchen shops. They have the right thickness and offer reasonable anti-glue-sticking surface.

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Posted 02/14/2014   5:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
How would one construct a sweat box to try this method?
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