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20th Century US Postal Stationery 1900-1999

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Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 02/15/2014   11:12 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ThomasGalloway to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here's what I did for my latest sweatbox design:

I went to Target and found a smallish plastic storage box. The one I chose would hold an 8.5 x 11 piece of paper flat and was about 3" deep. It had a cover that would reasonably keep the moisture in (i.e., it doesn't have to be hermetically sealed). I got a couple small sponges to hold the moisture. Now the tricky part (for me, anyway) is to find something that will hold the envelopes up off the bottom of the box and preferably above the sponges (only to prevent accidental touching). In a previous design I found a metal object at Home Depot that did the job, but unfortunately developed rust over time which proved to be problematic. It turns out hard to find something metal that doesn't develop problems in a high humidity environment. Annnnyway, I ended up getting some cheap plastic hair curlers (back at Target) which were about 1" in diameter, on which I could set the envelopes to be sweated. They worked fine.

So, you put a small amount of water in a couple sponges (wet them and really ring them out). DO NOT over hydrate your sweatbox! Arrange the sponges and hair curlers (or whatever neater thing you find to do the lifting job) so the envelopes on top of, say, 4 curlers (flap side up) don't touch the sponges. Close box. Wait. Sometimes its only a couple hours, sometimes its overnight.

The paper will get soggy, so handle with care. Use a dull dinner knife to gently lift the flap with the knife (or other suitable object), and quit (and wait) if there is any resistance. Eventually you will be able to open the flap.

If all you want to open is the flap, then move on to the drying and pressing phase. If you need the side flaps open, then return to the gentle testing process for the side flaps. They may take longer to loosen.

There may be a bit of glue haze left on the place where the flap was stuck. Load a sponge with warm water and wring out. Gently dab the spots to attracts the glue/gum to the sponge. Don't wipe side to side, as the paper is in a vulnerable state at this point.

General advice: play with some junk envelopes before working on your children's inheritance.
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Posted 02/15/2014   11:51 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you very much for your detailed how to. I will try.

Is there a product that is achival safe to place between an envelope flap and envelope to prevent this problem in first place?
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Posted 02/15/2014   1:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ThomasGalloway to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Of course, the best defense is a dry offense, to mangle a metaphor.

I have purchased many envelopes where the previous owner had placed a cut strip of glassine (which I assume came from cannibalized glassine envelopes) under the flap.

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Valued Member
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Posted 02/15/2014   6:16 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jobi01 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Glassine eventually releases sulfuric acid and is not recommended for long term use. Many of today's multipurpose paper is acid free. I use a pH test pen to test suitability. pH test pens are available from a number of sources.
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Rest in Peace
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Posted 02/16/2014   07:29 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
"... the best defense is a dry offense, to mangle a metaphor."

That's not mangling; that's clever adaptation.

Though the alliteration *was* painful.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
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Posted 02/16/2014   4:56 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jobi01 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Me thinky ikeypikey means control the humidity. Unfortunately that is not always easy in places like New Orleans but is a good idea anywhere.
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Posted 02/19/2014   8:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The United Postal Stationery Society (UPSS) has a nice "101" course explaining the collecting of postal stationery:

http://www.upss.org/code/ps101.php
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Posted 02/19/2014   8:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
UPSS also has additional information on collecting postal stationery at:
http://www.uh.edu/~lib19/upss1.htm

Also, Linn's also has a nice introduction to Postal Stationery:
http://www.linns.com/reference/stat...tionery.aspx

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Posted 03/09/2014   09:05 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The last USPS stamped enveloped issued in the 20th Century was the 33 cent Lincoln Black & Blue, Scott U645 (UPSS 3811-3814) on June 5, 1999. All 4 different types were all printed with type IV Recycle Logo and is Bar Tagged right of the design using Die 275.
USPS Specs an be seen on pgs 71-74:
http://lcpshome.org/pb/pb21997.pdf








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Albert
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Posted 03/24/2014   09:46 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Bill G., the USA 20th Century Envelope Column editor continues to bring us truly outstanding insights, updates and new finds in his bi-monthly column of the UPSS Postal Stationery magazine.
http://www.upss.org/index.php?PHPSE...4fe47e863e86
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Albert
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Posted 11/16/2014   07:34 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add acanalizo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Just downloaded from the UPSS the new ePublication ,Collector's Guide to Circular Dies of the Washington- Franklins of US Postal Stationery by Bill Lehr. It is a great 218 page fully illustrated with color images handbook that truly must have been a labor of love. Thank you jobi01.
http://www.upss.org/code/epublications.php
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Albert
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Posted 11/19/2014   5:01 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jobi01 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you for the kind words, Albert. It certainly was a labor. Even had one update before it was published and I continue to collect information and pictures.

Bill Lehr
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Bill Lehr
US Postal Stationery Specialist
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