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Book Or PDF Introduction Into US Classic Stamps (Heads)

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Valued Member
Germany
67 Posts
Posted 01/18/2017   07:21 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add joker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
yes, online there are many websites and many resources; I liked:
http://dubinweb.com/postageindex.html
there is even a big excel sheet with filter tools:

but as said I just wondered if there was a newer BOOK/PDF introduction with nice tables (just like in the mentioned link here, but for more stamps), but I learned that there isn't. Perhaps a publisher or author reads this and gets the idea :)
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Pillar Of The Community
United States
656 Posts
Posted 01/18/2017   08:29 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add SPQR to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Perhaps a publisher or author reads this and gets the idea :)

The Scott identification guide has been updated and is in its 6th edition. The information has not changed much over the years, so there is no need to reinvent the wheel.
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Valued Member
Germany
67 Posts
Posted 01/18/2017   09:11 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add joker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
hi,

yes this should be a good book, but hard to buy here. Is the Micarelli Guide from 1991 quite similar to the new Scott guide, concerning the layout (charts and so on) ?
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Pillar Of The Community
United States
1065 Posts
Posted 01/18/2017   09:48 am  Show Profile Check ray.mac's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add ray.mac to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Joker, I can't understand why you have mentioned Micarelli twice now, it seems like you want this to be the solution and you are trying to have someone agree.

The Brookman books are the bible for US Classics, but you're looking for a short cut. For Washington-Franklins, the bible is the Schmid book "Expert's Guide", or Martin Armstrong's book.

You can't shortcut knowledge. You can't learn it all with a table or right now. It takes years.

If you want to truly learn, please listen to what is being recommended, otherwise you're chasing rainbows....hope this helps, Ray
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Valued Member
Germany
67 Posts
Posted 01/18/2017   1:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add joker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Well indeed, I just hoped that there would be another book than the ones you mentioned, and at least I learned in this thread about Micarelli (mentioned the third time now, hope this is allowed). So with this, I am quite fine. And I also know that the old books are still the best to get the whole truth. So everything is ok, don't worry :). Still I think that a book that would combine the knowledge of the past with the possibilities of modern publishing could sell really well in the book store (ok in the virtual book store for stamp collectors).

by the way: I didn't get a recommendation for this book now:
Weiss, Larry S. THE WASHINGTON-FRANKLIN HEADS: SIMPLIFIED

so for a "shortcut" beginner like me, would it be best to read Weiss or Armstrong or Schmid?

and another explanation: in Europe it's really hard to buy all these books, and very expensive (with all the fees)
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Edited by joker - 01/18/2017 2:38 pm
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1189 Posts
Posted 01/18/2017   6:55 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Stampman2002 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Joker, The volumes listed by others are excellent resources for learning about the various types of issues for the different periods of U.S. stamps.

If you are looking for a general guide as to what GENERALLY identifies a stamp, The Micarelli Identification Guide to U.S. Stamps, 1847-1934, is a good STARTING point, but definitely not the end point. Once you have a general idea of what you are looking at, it's then time to pull out the specialized books by Luff, Armstrong, Brookman and others.

You should look at this as a long term project, not something you are going to purchase and have all of overnight. One of the keys is to learn as you go, building your collection and library at the same time. I remember as I advanced that I might pick up a stamp from a collection which I was not comfortable identifying (still do), but would then start looking for the reference material which went beyond a Scott Specialized catalogue to learn more about that particular issue.

Starting cautiously has its advantages. First, you are learning as you go, so don't go jumping into expensive issues until you are least have a solid understanding of what you are looking at. You will make mistakes as you go, misidentifying stamps, so the less costly the mistake the better! When you get a new book take the time to READ it cover to cover. Look at the photos, the images, the hand drawn diagrams (especially important in looking at the early U.S. stamps) so that you can understand what parts of the design the author is referring to. When you find an unfamiliar term, look it up. A good philatelic dictionary is a wonderful item to add to your library. Look also at any footnotes and the reference listing (bibliography) which may be in the book. Often, new information can be found in these listings or a new path to another source of information found.

Once you've read the book, look at the stamp again and see how much of what you've read can be put to use. Perhaps you'll find it wasn't the stamp you thought because you now realize there's either a part of the design missing or still there. Perhaps you picked up some information about the cancel the stamp has on it, but will need to then do some research to identify the cancel. All manner of things can be learned by studying these little pieces of paper we call stamps!

Above all, do what you enjoy. After all, it is a hobby and meant to be something to enjoy!

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Valued Member
Germany
67 Posts
Posted 01/19/2017   05:59 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add joker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hello Stampman,

this is really helpful and a nice answer. You just picked up the right thoughts, as I really mostly want to know just ALL about a new topic. I just don't want to wait. Here in Germany, the US stamps from that time are not very known as collection theme, as it is said to be too hard to understand. Now I know better why. But anyway I will concentrate on this. As you mention also and again the Micarelli :) ... may I tough ask a last question about this - then my "book and PDF" thread can come to an end (at last may the others say).
- is the Micarelli also explaining the different Washington Franklin Stamps (espec. 1c 2c) with some pictures?
- is an older version (1991 or 2001) also ok, or were there many changes since then in comparison with the new Scott Guide 6th edition?
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Pillar Of The Community
United States
656 Posts
Posted 01/19/2017   08:41 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add SPQR to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The Micarelli guide covers the Washington Franklin stamps
I'm still using a Micarelli guide from the 1980s, so I don't know how the newer editions have changed. There have not been many changes to the catalog numbering over the last 30 or 40 years. I would guess 98 or 99% of the listings are unchanged. I don't know if the illustrations have been upgraded in the newer editions.
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Pillar Of The Community
United States
1189 Posts
Posted 01/19/2017   3:09 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Stampman2002 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I'm using the 1991 edition of the Micarelli guide. It has pictures and footnotes to help in identifying the stamps, but it is just a beginning. It covers the definitive issues which have more than one type, including the Washington-Franklin issues of 1908-1921, the fourth bureau issues of the 1920s and the earlier stamps of the U.S.

I hope this helps. You should be able to either order it from Scott publishing or pick up a used copy on eBay which can be shipped directly to you.

Enjoy!
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Learn More...
United States
6374 Posts
Posted 01/19/2017   4:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stallzer to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have never seen the Micarelli guide. Would someone be so kind as to scan a page and post it here?
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United States
507 Posts
Posted 01/19/2017   8:19 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dkabq8 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
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