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Verify "Types" Of 1851 One Cent Franklins??

 
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Posted 01/29/2017   6:54 pm  Show Profile Check rlmstamps2012's eBay Listings Bookmark this topic Add rlmstamps2012 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Where can I find a way to determine types IV, V, and Va
of the 1847 one cent Franklin.

Don, when I look at stampsmarter, on this page, http://www.stampsmarter.com/1847usa...html#Scott40
I see # 23 as a type IV. I see # 24 as types V and Va.

So many # 24's that I see are called type IV's. ??

Any advice? I would love to learn about all of the types!
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Edited by rlmstamps2012 - 01/30/2017 4:27 pm

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Posted 01/29/2017   7:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Are you sure you are on the correct page? You are looking for 1847 stamps - the stampsmarter page is for 1851 issues.


Peter
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Posted 01/29/2017   7:19 pm  Show Profile Check sinclair2010's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add sinclair2010 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
If you see any #24's described as Type IV it is just wrong. #24's are either Type V or Va.
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Posted 01/29/2017   7:20 pm  Show Profile Check sinclair2010's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add sinclair2010 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
#23 is a Type IV.
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Posted 01/29/2017   8:21 pm  Show Profile Check rlmstamps2012's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlmstamps2012 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Thank you Winston for confirming that. I have seen many 24's described as type IV's. I should have tried more research before asking another goofy question, two days in a row!

I have tried not to open the Lester Brookman set that I bought from you.
Rather I have tried to read and learn online where I can magnify and
read without mauling a treasured minimal library.

Are there any links that I could try to understand all of these types?

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Posted 01/29/2017   8:40 pm  Show Profile Check sinclair2010's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add sinclair2010 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Try the USPCS website. I don't know but I bet there is some good stuff there. The Neinken book is an excellent reference. I will probably have one of those for sale soon.
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Posted 01/29/2017   9:15 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stallzer to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You can also download the Neinkek book from the US classics society for free, links to it are posted all over this site.
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Posted 01/29/2017   9:46 pm  Show Profile Check ray.mac's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add ray.mac to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I became a obsessed and a student of the 1857 1c perfed issue because I wanted a Va...you can go to websites and read there, but it really helps if you understand a bit about the plates and the whole story.

But, if you're averse to going to the main sources (like not opening the Brookman books), then the Ashbrook and Neinken books may sit also...but they are the bible.

You might see on a website that a Va doesn't have side scratches, but you'd really need to know that the A and E reliefs never have side scratches, and you have to plate the stamp to Plate 5, and then not all of plate 5 is type Va.....and there are some plate 8 and even 9 positions that look more complete than some of the plate 5 Va positions, but they are type V by definition, because Va can only come from plate 5.

So, it's a fascinating issue, and there are genuine finds to make, instead of some who look for gold in the coil waste rarities that they have literally no chance of finding, ever. But the Ashbrook and Neinken books are the way to go. Neinken is online on the USPCS site..I haven't looked for the Ashbrook books there.

Hope this helps....Ray
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Posted 01/29/2017   10:25 pm  Show Profile Check rlmstamps2012's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlmstamps2012 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Thanks to you all for the advice and your sharing knowledge.
I have read so many of all of your threads. Wow.

I think that I am a bit obsessed with them as well.
I better get with it for the search for books tomorrow. I can not help not wanting to wreck the books that I have. They are like treasure to me.
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Posted 01/29/2017   10:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dudley to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
rlm, your observation that many #24's are (mis)described as Type IV is correct. And as Type II, III, IIIA etc. eBay in particular is full of incorrectly described #24's--I contact at least two or three sellers per week to point out these errors.
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Posted 01/29/2017   10:39 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add littleriverphil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here's the USPCS Electronic library link.
You can make the page a large as you like this way.

http://www.uspcs.org/resource-cente...nic-library/
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Posted 01/30/2017   12:14 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
One of the more common mistakes, shall we say, intentional or not, is to describe a #24 as a Type III - since the top and bottom lines are broken for both types. Type IIIs are valuable stamps, and the Type V/Va #24s aren't as valuable, so this is a common mistake by people innocently 'wanting' their stamp to be worth more, and also from unscrupulous dealers. Type III with perforations is Scott #21, while imperforate, Type III is #8. You also see #24's with the perforations cut off to emulate a #8.

Type V/Va's are easy to distinguish from all other 1c Types once you know what they look like. Once you brush up on the reference material you will see.
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Posted 01/30/2017   4:40 pm  Show Profile Check rlmstamps2012's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlmstamps2012 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Thanks again to all of you.

I just edited the title of the thread to 1851. I can not
believe that I thought these stamps were started in 1847.

The thought of and link to the USPCS site is remarkable.
I really just started reading today. There are so many books there.
I did start reading "The United States One Cent Stamp of 1851
to 1861" By Mortimer L. Neinken. Wow. Exactly what I was looking for.
I was surprised to read that " This Work is Sincerely Dedicated
To The Memory of My Good Friend and Teacher STANLEY B. ASHBROOK"

This should keep me busy for a while!
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