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Scott 711 Undocumented Color

 
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Posted 03/14/2017   11:47 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add louvig to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Hi all,

Just curious if anyone has any idea what could have caused the color on the 711 to be brown. Overexposure to light? Chemical reaction to some solvent? Issue during production? It is MNH and gum looks like original to me (though I am no expert). Scott catalog only lists red orange. There are only traces of the red orange. The normal stamp is on the right for easy comparison. Thanks all.

Lou


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United States
8167 Posts
Posted 03/14/2017   11:49 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Looks very much like oxidation to me.


Peter
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Edited by Petert4522 - 03/14/2017 11:51 am
Valued Member
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Posted 03/14/2017   12:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add louvig to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Peter. Seems you are right. I searched for stamp oxidation and found this in another post:

"Oxidized - a term that is often used to refer to stamps, especially stamps with orange hues, that have darkened with age or from contact with air or sunlight. It is often assumed that oxygen is the culprit. In most cases it is actually the sulfur in the air, albeit in minute quantities, that combines with the metallic component, often lead, in the colored pigment. Nearly all metallic sulfides are black and this is what "darkens" the stamp. The sulphurization is reversible with the application of hydrogen peroxide, which replaces an oxygen atom with the offending sulfur atom, restoring the color."

It's not an expensive stamp and it is a duplicate so I think I will try the peroxide experiment and see what happens.

Lou
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Posted 03/14/2017   12:23 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Lou, let us know and see what happened with that stamp!


Peter
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Posted 03/14/2017   12:50 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add louvig to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It actually worked. Stamp is restored.

I took a Q-tip dabbed with peroxide and carefully painted the front of the stamp with it. I could see it start to change color as the oxygen atoms replaced the sulfur atoms. I gave it two coats of peroxide. After it dried the gum was untouched and it looks perfectly fine.

I never expected to learn about chemistry by collecting stamps!

Lou

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