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Ahmednagar Pow Postcards

 
 
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Posted 12/02/2011   3:13 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add PostmasterGS to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Picked these up this week and thought I'd share.

At the outbreak of WWI, most of Germany's colonies in the Pacific and Africa were quickly overrun. The only exception was German East Africa, where German forces under General Paul Emil von Lettow-Vorbeck defeated the British in battle, then took to the countryside to conduct a 4-year-long campaign.

Most of the Germans captured by the British in German East Africa (and to a lesser extent, German Southwest Africa) were transported to India, where they were interned at the Ahmednagar POW camp.

In Ahmednagar, the POWs could write four letters a month, two in German and two in English, on a single sheet of paper measuring 4"x7". They could send an unlimited number of postcards because the postcards were easier to censor.

Here are a couple postcards,one in English and one in German, sent from the same POW in Aug and Oct 1919.




The POW was instructed to cross out the inapplicable portions, and to write only the date and signature. This made the cards easy to censor.
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Presenting the GermanStamps.net Collection - Germany, Colonies, & Occupied Territories, 1872-1945

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Posted 12/02/2011   3:15 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jhlovell to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Never seen one before. Thanks for showing! - Jeff
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Posted 12/02/2011   4:06 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add scotzm to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
A similar system of postcards was used by injured WW1 British soldiers to inform their wives, parents, sweethearts (delete as applicable). I've always wanted one but they are very hard to find... despite the vast numbers of injuries caused in battle.

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Posted 12/02/2011   4:52 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add philb to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Scotzm, you would think they have to be out there somewhere...my friend collects the mail from Canadian P.O.W. camps...some of which were quite tiny or only open a short time...but the material is out there...beyond my pocketbook but evidently not his !!
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Posted 12/02/2011   8:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

This was a discussion in 2008 on an old Newsgroup

Maybe there is some information that may be helpful?

Sorry but you will have to edit....


Some days ago I obtained a "I am quite well" pow card, from the pow camp
Ahmednagar, dated Dec 16 1914. Not very remarkable so far - but, it is
addressed to Germany.
Can somebody give me a hint, why a german soldier is a pow in a indian
camp during WW I?



Peter
On Apr 9, 11:15 am, "Blair (TC)" < wrote:
On Apr 9, 9:43 am, taodave < wrote:



In article <,
Peter Baumann < wrote:

Some days ago I obtained a "I am quite well" pow card, from the pow camp
Ahmednagar, dated Dec 16 1914. Not very remarkable so far - but, it is
addressed to Germany.
Can somebody give me a hint, why a german soldier is a pow in a indian
camp during WW I?

Peter

Peter,

Here is a translation from Wolfgang Herterich's " Deutsch Ost-Afrika
Kriegsgefangen- und Interniertenpost 1914-1920" kindly supplied to me by
Bill Clark:

"Immediately after outbreak of the War, camps for members of the Central
Powers were created in British India, in which Germans, Austrians, and
Turks were detained. Farmers, buyers, missionaries and engineers from
the entire Asiatic area and numerous merchant ship crews were imprisoned
by the British. The main place of confinement for these groups was
selected as Ahmednagar near Bombay."

I collect and exhibit German East Africa and have a number of these
cards from later in the War, both from civilian internees and from
Schutztruppe soldiers (usually sick ones who had been left behind by
Lettow-Vorbeck for the British to treat).

HTH,

David Lobdell

Ahmednagar seems to have quite a history as a POW camp.

1902, cover to Boer POW with S. Africa censor tape and
faint Ahmednagar Camp censor handstamp.

Sorry! I forgot the URL.



1915, WWI - Hungarian POW cover from Ahmednagar to
Hungary.http://www.mayoph.com/images/99D632.JPG

During WW2, Ahmednagar held German, Italian and Japanese POWs.

Blair
In article <,
Peter Baumann < wrote:

taodave schrieb:
In article <,
Peter Baumann < wrote:

Some days ago I obtained a "I am quite well" pow card, from the pow camp
Ahmednagar, dated Dec 16 1914. Not very remarkable so far - but, it is
addressed to Germany.
Can somebody give me a hint, why a german soldier is a pow in a indian
camp during WW I?



Peter

Peter,

Here is a translation from Wolfgang Herterich's " Deutsch Ost-Afrika
Kriegsgefangen- und Interniertenpost 1914-1920" kindly supplied to me by
Bill Clark:

"Immediately after outbreak of the War, camps for members of the Central
Powers were created in British India, in which Germans, Austrians, and
Turks were detained. Farmers, buyers, missionaries and engineers from
the entire Asiatic area and numerous merchant ship crews were imprisoned
by the British. The main place of confinement for these groups was
selected as Ahmednagar near Bombay."

I collect and exhibit German East Africa and have a number of these
cards from later in the War, both from civilian internees and from
Schutztruppe soldiers (usually sick ones who had been left behind by
Lettow-Vorbeck for the British to treat).

HTH,

David Lobdell
Thank you all for your answers!

I found out, that there were 3 camps at Ahmendnagar up to the end of WW
I. Camp A, as a "punishment camp" - camp B as a regular military and
"Parole Camp". Third a camp for civilians.

It seems, there were lots of german civilians in India at that time,
mostly missionares, male and female.
So I think my card is surely from one of those german civilians.


Peter

Peter,

The translation of Herterich which I have puts it a bit differently:

Camp "A"- for internees of low social status (e.g. sailors)

Camp "B"- for internees of higher social status, as well as later
prisoners of war from GEA

Camp "C"- parole camp. for internees who had given their word of honour
to make no escape attempt and to take no action contrary to British
interests.

David Lobdell
Asia-translation schrieb:
I have a very scratchy old copy of some notes on the postal history of
the Ahmednagar Camp from the India Study Circle.

If anyone is interested, email me, and I'll be happy to send a copy.

Tony
Well, I am! That would be great.
Just kill NOSPAM and it works.
Thank you very much

Peter
I have a very scratchy old copy of some notes on the postal history of
the Ahmednagar Camp from the India Study Circle.

If anyone is interested, email me, and I'll be happy to send a copy.

Tony
taodave schrieb:
In article <,
Peter Baumann < wrote:

Some days ago I obtained a "I am quite well" pow card, from the pow camp
Ahmednagar, dated Dec 16 1914. Not very remarkable so far - but, it is
addressed to Germany.
Can somebody give me a hint, why a german soldier is a pow in a indian
camp during WW I?



Peter

Peter,

Here is a translation from Wolfgang Herterich's " Deutsch Ost-Afrika
Kriegsgefangen- und Interniertenpost 1914-1920" kindly supplied to me by
Bill Clark:

"Immediately after outbreak of the War, camps for members of the Central
Powers were created in British India, in which Germans, Austrians, and
Turks were detained. Farmers, buyers, missionaries and engineers from
the entire Asiatic area and numerous merchant ship crews were imprisoned
by the British. The main place of confinement for these groups was
selected as Ahmednagar near Bombay."

I collect and exhibit German East Africa and have a number of these
cards from later in the War, both from civilian internees and from
Schutztruppe soldiers (usually sick ones who had been left behind by
Lettow-Vorbeck for the British to treat).

HTH,

David Lobdell
Thank you all for your answers!

I found out, that there were 3 camps at Ahmendnagar up to the end of WW
I. Camp A, as a "punishment camp" - camp B as a regular military and
"Parole Camp". Third a camp for civilians.

It seems, there were lots of german civilians in India at that time,
mostly missionares, male and female.
So I think my card is surely from one of those german civilians.


Peter
On Apr 9, 9:43 am, taodave < wrote:
In article <,
Peter Baumann < wrote:

Some days ago I obtained a "I am quite well" pow card, from the pow camp
Ahmednagar, dated Dec 16 1914. Not very remarkable so far - but, it is
addressed to Germany.
Can somebody give me a hint, why a german soldier is a pow in a indian
camp during WW I?

Peter

Peter,

Here is a translation from Wolfgang Herterich's " Deutsch Ost-Afrika
Kriegsgefangen- und Interniertenpost 1914-1920" kindly supplied to me by
Bill Clark:

"Immediately after outbreak of the War, camps for members of the Central
Powers were created in British India, in which Germans, Austrians, and
Turks were detained. Farmers, buyers, missionaries and engineers from
the entire Asiatic area and numerous merchant ship crews were imprisoned
by the British. The main place of confinement for these groups was
selected as Ahmednagar near Bombay."

I collect and exhibit German East Africa and have a number of these
cards from later in the War, both from civilian internees and from
Schutztruppe soldiers (usually sick ones who had been left behind by
Lettow-Vorbeck for the British to treat).

HTH,

David Lobdell

Ahmednagar seems to have quite a history as a POW camp.

1902, cover to Boer POW with S. Africa censor tape and
faint Ahmednagar Camp censor handstamp.

1915, WWI - Hungarian POW cover from Ahmednagar to Hungary.


During WW2, Ahmednagar held German, Italian and Japanese POWs.

Blair
In article <,
Peter Baumann < wrote:

Some days ago I obtained a "I am quite well" pow card, from the pow camp
Ahmednagar, dated Dec 16 1914. Not very remarkable so far - but, it is
addressed to Germany.
Can somebody give me a hint, why a german soldier is a pow in a indian
camp during WW I?



Peter

Peter,

Here is a translation from Wolfgang Herterich's " Deutsch Ost-Afrika
Kriegsgefangen- und Interniertenpost 1914-1920" kindly supplied to me by
Bill Clark:

"Immediately after outbreak of the War, camps for members of the Central
Powers were created in British India, in which Germans, Austrians, and
Turks were detained. Farmers, buyers, missionaries and engineers from
the entire Asiatic area and numerous merchant ship crews were imprisoned
by the British. The main place of confinement for these groups was
selected as Ahmednagar near Bombay."

I collect and exhibit German East Africa and have a number of these
cards from later in the War, both from civilian internees and from
Schutztruppe soldiers (usually sick ones who had been left behind by
Lettow-Vorbeck for the British to treat).

HTH,

David Lobdell
On Wed, 09 Apr 2008 13:26:15 +0200, Peter Baumann
< wrote:

Some days ago I obtained a "I am quite well" pow card, from the pow camp
Ahmednagar, dated Dec 16 1914. Not very remarkable so far - but, it is
addressed to Germany.
Can somebody give me a hint, why a german soldier is a pow in a indian
camp during WW I?

Could it possibly be a sailor, caught up in a port at the time of the
onset of hostilities? If not mistaken, some ships were interned on
foreign shores.

Further, since India was a British colony at the time, "empire", many
Indians fought in WWI. There may have been something in the way that
Germans in India were handled.

Indians fought in Gallipoli, north & east Africa. Heavy losses were
taken in east Africa, especially the port of Tanga, which was a route
of the British forces by German military and colonials. von Lettow
led the only true German victory that lasted throughout the war - he
was never caught and fought the entire time, until surrendering after
the armistice was signed.

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Posted 12/02/2011   11:04 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add philb to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I don't know why but it reminds me when I was stationed in Italy..some of the bar owners would like to show off their English...but I thought it was odd their British accents..until they told me they had spent 1941-45 in England as P.O.W.s the island must have been bursting at the seams !!
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Posted 12/03/2011   12:56 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Ajnabii to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Those postcards must be highly collectable. I find it interesting that the date on one of them runs into 1919. When were these soldiers repatriated? My wife's biological grandfather was in the Ottoman army and was captured by the British in Yemen. He spent until the early/mid 1920s in a british camp. When he returned, my wife's grandmother had already remarried. I'd love to know what the situation was in those camps. Were they allowed to write home or was the literacy rate so low very few did?
The last time I was in Germany I was speaking to some older gents in a pub in Halle/Saale. They asked me where I was from
and when I answered Kentucky the man began to laugh because he'd been a POW at Fort Knox. I can't imagine being repatriated from a US prisoner of war camp to the drab Soviet Occupation zone. :)
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Edited by Ajnabii - 12/03/2011 12:59 am
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Posted 12/03/2011   09:42 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

We have descendents of Italian POW's in our town,
they were such good workers, they were invited back
after the war.




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Posted 12/03/2011   10:31 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add philb to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
In 1961 some of the Italian personel that were getting discharged from the service were going to Australia to work as mechanics etc: I hope they liked it and stayed.. it was a long boat ride in those days !! The area where we were in southern Italy was extremely poor..so they had to be better off finacially in Australia !!
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Posted 02/06/2013   8:49 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bas S Warwick to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here's one I had tucked away

Switzerland - to POW Ahmednagar 1915 with perhaps and attempt to conceal the message. British over French



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Posted 02/06/2013   10:28 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
To square the circle, so to speak, here is a card from an WWII Italian POW at the Bhopal internment camp in India





still being held in 1946
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Posted 02/07/2013   04:11 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Ajnabii to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Tony,
This subject caught my attention. I researched it a bit. There's a nice wiki page about POW camps in India from the Boer War until the end of the Second World War.

http://wiki.fibis.org/index.php?tit...mps_in_India

Wasn't there a movie made recently about a group of German POWs who escape brom a British Camp in India and walk back to Germany? I think this was based on a group of Germans who escaped from a Soviet Camp and walked their way to Japan. Here's something about escapes from India and Rolf Magener

http://gaebler.info/india/escape.htm#1


IRIC the Soviets kept some of their German POWs until the mid 1950s.

My wife is Turkish. Her biological grandfather was captured in Yemen by British Forces during World War I. He was a POW until the mid 1920s. When he was repatriated back to Turkey, his wife had remarried and had children with another man and his own children were strangers to him. My Father In Law said that for as long as he could remember, his "real dad" never spoke about his experiences.
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Posted 02/07/2013   07:58 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Ajnabii, I have to confess that my main interest in the card was peripheral: I do collect the stamps of Bhopal State, so this makes a nice sideline to my collection.

That an Italian was still being held in India in April '46 seems a bit tough, though. They'd thrown in the towel years earlier.
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Posted 02/07/2013   08:46 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add I_Love_Stamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It's scary that these even had to exist isn't it? Sort of a "mixed blessing" of sorts.
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Posted 02/07/2013   09:11 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Ajnabii to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Tony: I think it's the amateur historian in me. I also majored in German language and lit in college. It's interesting though how alot of the German and Italian POWs who were in the US and British POW camps managed to stay there after the war. I've met Germans who were captured and held at Fort Knox and Fort Dix who said the POW experience was far better off than what awaited them if they hadn't been captured.
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Posted 02/07/2013   5:36 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
In general, I'd agree with you Ajnabii. A relaxed post-War life in a US Army camp probably was a good deal pleasanter than repatriation to a devastated German or Italian countryside.

On the other hand, life in the Bhopal camp in India must have been a bit of a shock to the system after Rome for my POW. (Though, because he ended up in India, he was probably taken in Italian East Africa. Perhaps the climate wasn't so unexpected after all.)
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