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Old German Reichsbanknotes & Japan Milatary Currency? I.d. ?

 
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United States
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Posted 10/24/2012   12:07 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add UFOAirMail to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Folks can anyone tell me what these are? I found them this morning going through more of my grandfathers collection.
Thank you for any help / info you can provide me with












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Posted 10/24/2012   1:23 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add doug2222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
These are all listed in Albert Pick's "Standard Catalog of World Paper Money," and are typical of what servicemen would have brought back as souvenirs from World War I and II.

The 10,000 Mark is Pick #71, 50c to $1, used.
The 100,000 Mark is Pick #83, $2 to $3, used.
The One Centavo is Philippines (Japanese Occupation) Pick #102, 10c to 50c, used.
The 50 Sen is Japan (Allied Military Occupation) Pick #65, $1 to $3, used.
The 10 Sen is similar, Pick #63, $1 to $3, used.

As you might guess from the catalog values, all of these were brought back to the U.S. in huge quantities, and every envelope of old foreign bills seems to have an example or two.
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Canada
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Posted 10/24/2012   3:22 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I believe that the German bills were called "Notgeld"

Chimo

Bujutsu
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Posted 10/24/2012   3:42 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add doug2222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Nope, not "notgeld" - that term is reserved for private quasi-official city and provincial notes ("gutschein") redeemable only in the immediate area of issue, for the most part. In general, they were much smaller in size and tended to be brightly-colored; there was no "control" on the amount printed, so they were the ultimate fiat money, with no backing other than the "good name" of the city or town in question.

Also, they were intended to alleviate a severe coin shortage; the silver , 1, 2, 3, and 5 mark coins minted 1873 to 1915 disappeared virtually overnight as it became clear that Germany would lose World War I.

The bills shown in this thread are Federal issues, subject to drastic inflation; within a short time, new currency was denominated in the billions of marks, as were the stamps.
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Posted 10/24/2012   7:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting.

I guess I should assume that the currency I saw on regular paper and w/o any serial number was "Notgeld" or am I mistaken again??? Coins and paper money was never my forte - I can spend it though

Chimo

Bujutsu
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Posted 10/24/2012   7:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add doug2222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here are traditional Notgeld. Pfennig=German, Heller=Austrian. Once in a great while, they had serial numbers, but this made it too easy for the locals to figure out how many were being printed.


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Posted 10/24/2012   10:50 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add kuhli to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
as for the Japanese occupation currency -

for the most commonly found notes, look at the control letters.

P was for Philippines, in centavos and pesos
M was for Malaya, in cents and dollars
B was for Burma, in rupees
S was for Dutch East Indies, in cents and guldens
O was for Oceania, in shillings



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Posted 10/24/2012   11:10 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add doug2222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting sidelight -- years ago, some dodgy dealers offered the "M" prefix notes as Japanese Invasion currency for the United States, which had a much bigger "gee whiz" factor.

The notes didn't say "Malaya," and there was Dollars and Cents, right in your face, so who could argue?
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