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Anyone Collect Fishing On Stamps?

 
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Pillar Of The Community
Singapore
884 Posts
Posted 11/11/2018   10:21 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tantsbsac to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Singapore 2018 Good Evening Singapore miniature sheet

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Pillar Of The Community
7665 Posts
Posted 07/12/2019   11:57 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add nethryk to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here are images of the four stamps in a set depicting Kiribati tuna fishing operations, designed by G. Drummond, printed by lithography, and issued by Kiribati on November 19, 1981, Scott Nos. 380-83.

- nethryk

Bonriki Fish Farm - tuna bait breeding center


Fishing for tuna


Cold storage of tuna at Betio


Government tuna fishing vessel - Nei Manganibuka

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Edited by nethryk - 07/12/2019 12:49 pm
Pillar Of The Community
United States
2711 Posts
Posted 07/12/2019   7:11 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add bookbndrbob to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
On January 12, 2017 Ireland released a set of 8 computer-vended stamps from its 9th definitive series "A History of Ireland in 100 objects". One of these stamps features a Late Mesolithic Period fish trap found in a bog in Clowanstown. This relic now can be seen at the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin.

From the 100objects.ie website, "It does not look like much: some small, smooth interwoven sticks embedded in the turf from a bog at Clowanstown in Co. Meath. The bog, however, was once a lake, and the woven sticks are an astonishing survival: part of a conical trap used by early Irish people to scoop fish from the lake or catch them in a weir. Radiocarbon tests date it to between 5210 and 4970 B.C. The Irish trap could be called a classic design: similar items continue to be used around the world."

In fact, to see a similar fish trap which isn't 7000 years old, go back to page 7 of this thread and you will find a modern one from Togo.


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