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Spanish Morocco With Reverse Number

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Posted 06/07/2014   12:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add sksvlad to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Why is there a number on its reverse side?




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Posted 06/07/2014   02:05 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Cursus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It's just a control number. Very common on Spanish stamps of this era.
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Rest in Peace
United States
4052 Posts
Posted 06/07/2014   07:55 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Just curious: Over the gum, or under the gum?
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Finland
751 Posts
Posted 06/07/2014   10:15 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add scb to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It's likely under the gum, as used specimens have got it as well.

-k-
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Collecting the world 1840 to date one stamp at a time.
Author & owner of Stamp Collecting Blog
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Posted 06/07/2014   10:22 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Cursus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I don't collect Spain, but I've as well used stamps with number. So, it's under t'he gum.
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Posted 06/07/2014   10:45 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add DonSellos to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Any ideas on how the control numbers worked? Were the stamps consecutively numbered? What exactly did the numbers control?

Don
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Posted 06/07/2014   10:58 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add sksvlad to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I don't know how to determine if the number is under or over the gum.
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Posted 06/07/2014   1:10 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Cursus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The Edifil "Especilaizado", gives a list of the number printed on the back of Spanish stamps, but fails to give any information on the numbers on Spanish Morocco stamps of the 1950 decade.
Just to say that the printing run was of 40.000, and the catalog value is minimal.
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Posted 06/08/2014   08:23 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
These numbers were used to keep track of stamp inventories especially at the post office so that postal employees could not steal stamps. It allowed for accounting for which stamps were sold and how much money there had to be for the stamps sold. The stamps had to be sold in numerical order. The first stamp number was recorded along with the last one. The last sold stamp number would be subtracted from the first sold stamp number. The result was the quantity sold and this was multiplied by the face value on the stamp to get the total value amount sold.
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Edited by jogil - 06/08/2014 08:24 am
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Posted 01/19/2021   01:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Sc#B43 1954
(Lines are from my dying scanner)


A.V.2 auxilliary markings
Australian Stamp Monthly 1984



Rodney:

The A.V.2 (Avion 2) handstamp refers to a class of Airmail.
It is seen on a number of countries mail from the 1940s to 1960s.

The oval Arabic handstamp is a Censor mark which
is seen in a number of African and Middle East countries.
It is usually seen in blue.


Roland F. Kohl The O.A.T Mark... A New Collection Area
Translated by Charles J . LaBlonde,
from Postal History 14/54 April 1993 .
POSTGESCHICHTE-VERLAG Postfach174
CH-8024 Zürich Switzerland .

Air mail letters from the Second World War are very
popular since they often followed very indirect routes
to avoid the actual war zones.

This is especially true of letters from Switzerland to
overseas destinations. The letters often bear evidence
of censorship and tests for hidden writing, making
them especially interesting for postal history collectors.

The postal administrations of neutral countries tried
their best to find ways of keeping the mail moving to
its intended destination. Air, land and sea routes
were used to do this.

Air mail letters, which in reality could actually travel
only part way by air (often at a reduced postal rate),
would be marked with "Par avion jusqu'a. . .
("By air mail only to.. .)

On the other hand, mail which arrived at a transit
point and was to be forwarded by airmail would
get the mark "O.A.T. "

But only the top letter in the bundle of mail
would get this marking! This explains the relative
rarity of the O.A.T.marking. At the time collectors
first discovered letters bearing the O.A.T. marking
its exact meaning was not clear.

Questions to the Universal Postal Union (UPU)
proved fruitless. In the archives of the British
Post Office the mystery was solved. .. the
letters mean "Onward Air Transmission."

Since this marking, usually in red, appears in
many forms, it makes an interesting research
area. The most recent comprehensive
publication of information about O.A.T. marks
appeared in the monthly "Airpost Journal"
(published by the American Airmail Society)
in December 1991 and January 1992.

It was written by a Canadian, Murray Heifitz.
In his research, he also discovered the
marking "A.V.2."

This is related to a UPU form "Avion 2"
which was applied by the post office of
origin to the top letter of a bundle
(and still is today) .

The form contains the routing of the
bundle, the weight and the number of
letters in the bundle. It serves the
later calculation of the division of the
postage between UPU countries.

The marking A.V.2 then serves the
same purpose as O.A.T. It was used,
according to Heifitz, in Singapore,
Hong Kong, Bangkok, Amman, Cairo,
Tripoli (Libya) and San Francisco from
1940 to 1957 and even later in other
places (eg 1966 in Prague) .

The O.A.T.marking was used, also
according to Heifitz, in London,
Prestwick, Tangiers, Hong Kong
and Amman from 1940 to1945.

Further research will certainly bring
additional facts to light.Heifitz lists
19 types of O.A.T. marks and
22 types of the A.V.2, based upon
around 500 letters.

The A.V.2 marking seems the rarer
of the two. Heifitz estimates that
around 1000 to 1500 examples of
A.V.2 are known to be in
collectors hands. The number could
be somewhat higher, based upon
collector and dealer holdings.

Blair

References:
UPU Convention (Paris 1947)
American Philatelist Sept 1962 Vol 75 #12
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Edited by rod222 - 01/19/2021 02:57 am
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United Kingdom
3040 Posts
Posted 01/19/2021   03:52 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add nigelc to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Spain started using these control numbers in 1901.

The number reflected the sheet rather than the stamp so all stamps in a sheet had the same number but each sheet had a different number.
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Nigel
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Canada
712 Posts
Posted 01/19/2021   07:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gmot to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Stamps or sets with the control number A,000,000 are considerably more valuable, so worth keeping an eye out for.

Example - a 1909 set from Rio de Oro I used to own.


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Australia
31298 Posts
Posted 01/19/2021   2:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
gmot,
That is what I understood also, but I have been advised, not so.
As Nigel explains, each sheet had the same number printed.
So they should be as common as other numbers.

Nice collection however.
http://goscf.com/t/64563#560976 br /
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Edited by rod222 - 01/19/2021 2:30 pm
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United States
550 Posts
Posted 01/19/2021   3:28 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add billsey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
A000,000 typically was for a specimen stamp, so outside the normal numbering.
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Australia
31298 Posts
Posted 01/19/2021   4:13 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Then I have a postally cancelled Specimen.
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Canada
712 Posts
Posted 01/19/2021   4:20 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gmot to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Very interesting - yes, my understanding is that it was used for specimen stamps - haven't seen a used one.
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