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Will Stamp Collecting Survive?

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Posted 04/18/2020   08:34 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add sharonb to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
For those who are trying to get their head around Instagram and some social media sites. One way of gauging the level of interest in a particular topic is the check out the number of posts associated with individual hashtags. So for instance #stampcollection has 116,392 posts. #philately has 312,320 posts, #philatelic has 86,245 posts (maybe a term not used so much by millenials? #postagestamps has 141,815 posts. These numbers indicate that there is quite a bit of activity. Of note too is if you look at some of the phots is that they are writing real letters to each other.
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Posted 04/18/2020   08:48 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jkelley01938 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Of course stamp collecting will survive. Its just that "the Golden Age" has passed.

Jack Kelley
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Posted 04/18/2020   09:44 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
... 116,392 posts ... 312,320 posts ... 86,245 posts ... 141,815 posts ...


I dunno, sharonb, you know way too much about social media to be a stamp collector.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey (who likes to bury his irony)
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Edited by ikeyPikey - 04/18/2020 09:46 am
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Posted 04/18/2020   11:25 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add BrotherSquint to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
A great way to introduce a millennial or pretty much anybody to stamp collecting is the Exploring Stamps channel on YouTube. Graham Beck has produced three seasons of of 15+ videos each. The videos are professionally produced without looking too slick. He's tied in Instagram and Twitter posts in an engaging and appealing way. The thing I find so appealing is that he makes a convincing case for stamp collecting as an interesting pursuit that adds particular value to your life and connects to a wide range of topics in the world around us. I find that his approach makes a strong case that philately can link to almost anyone's interests. He even makes use of an app called Snupps to post some of his collection (tied to the episodes of the Exploring Stamps video series) online. His WordPress site is a good place to connect to see the range of what he's doing. Here's the link: https://exploringstamps.wordpress.com
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Posted 05/02/2020   2:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stamps_philateli to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Yes , Stamp Collection will survive. There are many emerging websites like postcrossing which connect people to stamps and postcards.
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Posted 05/04/2020   02:38 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Timm to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Survive what? I didn't know it was on a ventilator! And stamp ventilators are hard to find.
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Posted 05/06/2020   7:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add sharonb to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here is another article on young people collecting interests. The author followed the hashtags on social media like instagram to get a sense of the numbers. These collections are displayed in creative manner such as along colour lines or even like food. I dont care how they are displayed in the long run I am just pleased to see younger people collecting- I hope the link to the article will work - if not just copy and paste https://www.purewow.com/tech/millen...p-collecting
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Posted 05/06/2020   8:06 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jkelley01938 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Sorry. The Golden Age has passed.

Jack Kelley
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Posted 05/06/2020   9:01 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The Golden Age was little black trays (for watermark detection), little squeezey tongs (for fingermark avoidance), and counting those little bumps around the edges of the stamp (for reasons that escape me).

Glad to see some fresh blood come along with some fresh ideas, even if they're out of my personal bounds.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
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Edited by ikeyPikey - 05/07/2020 02:17 am
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Posted 05/06/2020   9:33 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lithograving to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I think the Golden Age was the Era of beautifully engraved stamps.

Back in 1967 the Centennial definitives were issued in
single colour engraved.

I was so disappointment that the Group of Seven paintings on
the high values weren't printed in full colour.

Shortly after I got my wish, lots of colour but
no more engraved.

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Posted 05/07/2020   01:46 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Walkman82 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
"Reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated." Mark Twain, 1897.

So it is, I believe, with the future of stamp collecting...

As long as there are tiny bits of paper with ink on one side and adhesive on the other, there will be people who want to collect them. There are many reasons that people collect stamps. It may be for the history, architecture, people, places, and things. It may be because some stamps are worth money and people think that stamps are a good thing to invest in. It may be an escape from the world of today to participate in a solitary hobby that brings them joy. It may be a combination of these things and more. Whatever the reasoning behind collecting stamps, we as a hobby will continue to thrive.

Technology has evolved significantly in the last 50 years and stamp collecting has evolved along with it. Not that it has been an easy journey. Many stamp collectors are old and refuse to take part in the digital revolution that is now part of our world. Others have embraced it and use technology to the best of their own unique abilities. We have to admit that it has changed the hobby, in some ways for the better and others for the worse. One thing is certain - that with the technology available to us today, it is easier than ever to learn more about the hobby through online publications, web sites, streaming videos, blogs, and discussion groups.

Some people point to numbers and lament that they are not as high as they once were. Memberships in philatelic societies, clubs, and groups definitely are not what they used to be. It's likely that they will never again achieve the numbers that they once did. There are not as many brick-and-mortar stamp dealers as there once were, but we have not seen a shortage of the number of stamps available. The venues have simply changed from going to a local stamp shop to buying online. These are not necessarily bad things as it may reflect the changing world and how people connect digitally today rather than face-to-face. The only constant in human history is change and "99 percent of all statistics only tell 49 percent of the story."

There will always be things to be sent through the mail. The necessity of being able to physicall send things to other people is as important today as it ever has been. Papers, gifts, mail or online purchases, birthday greetings, postcards, and correspondence are just a few items that flow via mail and will continue as long as people exist. As these interactions will continue, stamps will be with us and there will be people to collect them.

Postal services are not going to go away. The USPS hemorrhages money every year and is still here and will continue as long as there is demand to send things to other people. That is not to say that it will remain the same as it is today. It will evolve and change with the times and with those changes, create new and different ways to collect stamps. Computer-vended postage is just one example of this happening even now.

There are many other collectibles hobbies that have been stronger in the past, but are still around today. Sports cards, comic books, Hot Wheels, Barbies and GI Joes, Star Wars, coins, etc. all have strong collector appeal and many afficonados. One advantage that stamp collecting has that many of the others do not is that stamps are delivered to us on the letters, envelopes, and packages we receive. I receive more stamps now as a perk to buying online from sellers/dealers who use 3 or 4 old stamps to send the items to me than I ever have in the past.

Unlike many in the hobby, I do not believe that kids are the future of the hobby. I think that the future is the people who come back to stamp collecting as adults who once collected or were interested as kids. Don't get me wrong, I strongly believe that we should foster a love of stamps in kids of all ages. The young or middle-aged adult, starting out on their own or established in adulthood, raising a family of their own and looking for a wholesome activity that brings them enjoyment, something that they can do with their children or other family members. That is the bread-and-butter of growth in the hobby.

These are just a few of my thoughts on the future of stamp collecting. What are yours?

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Visit my website @ www.scottsstampcollection.com
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Posted 05/30/2020   8:48 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Timm to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
If you've seen some of the ridiculously high prices some people are paying on eBay lately you'd think stamps cured covid!
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Posted 05/31/2020   02:43 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Torin to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Timm: I completely agree. What explains this?
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Posted 05/31/2020   06:22 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add angore to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
If you consider what money for those that are still working, it may be savings (restaurant food, gas, stamp shows, etc.) from not doing something else, it could be unspent income.

Scenario 1
1. ebay purchases - $400, maybe overpaid

Scenario 2 - show
1. food - $40
2. Transportation - $25
3. Lodging - #100
4. purchase - if you got the same lot on ebay, you would be left with $235 budget

Of course if you like the social aspects, you have to put a value on that.
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Al
Edited by angore - 05/31/2020 2:38 pm
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Posted 05/31/2020   1:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Torin to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Angore: Good points. Perhaps stamp aficionados aren't as affected by high unemployment rates as the general population.
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