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Guess The Seller Didn't Get As Much As He Wanted............

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Posted 07/28/2015   5:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Two years ago I bid on a misperforated strip of Ambulance coils, 2128a and won the auction for $9.00. When I paid, my money was refunded with a notice that they could not find the strip! I let it go, thinking the seller was honest.
They advertise in The American Philatelist!
Well, about last September the strip magically appeared again! It is now a "Buy it now" for about $35.00.
Needless to say, I am no longer interested in either the strip or the firm!

Peter
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Posted 07/28/2015   5:11 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Jenny2U to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Don I wouldn't read that much into it. The seller simply made a business decision not to sell at the final price.
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Posted 07/28/2015   5:20 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add KGB to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Jenny, one can speak about fairness to the seller, but it is the buyer who is inconvenienced and, perhaps, penalized. If one is to offer an item for auction the onus is on the seller to have the item available.

I think surrendering ten percent of final sale price, or something like that, is quite fair. eBay is more pleasant a place, certainly, when the buyer is better protected.
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Posted 07/28/2015   5:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Mike33 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
They could have eventually found it - send them a message offering the original $9.00 and see what happens
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Posted 07/29/2015   08:27 am  Show Profile Check revenuecollector's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add revenuecollector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Oh by the way, does anybody really feel bad that they snared a misidentified silk paper or a double transfer of some other such gem when going through a dealer's stockbook at a show?


Never. It's part of "the game". Knowledge is power. Dealers cherrypick other dealers all the time. On one of my recent acquisitions, that I paid over $300 for, the dealer who sold it to me told me flat out he paid less than $10 for it from another dealer's inventory at a show. That didn't lessen its value to me.

I've inadvertently sold items without knowing the full extent of what they were. You chalk it up as a learning experience and move on. It's incumbent upon the seller to know what they are selling and its market value.
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Posted 07/29/2015   11:01 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rustyc to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
It's incumbent upon the seller to know what they are selling and its market value.


I agree completely. Also, the seller knows what he or she paid for the item(s) so presumably the transaction is still profitable, just not so much so.
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Posted 07/29/2015   11:10 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add kevin504 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
It's incumbent upon the seller to know what they are selling and its market value.


Should this be also said for the "buyer"???
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Posted 07/29/2015   11:27 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add KGB to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
kevin, I don't know what you mean by this. The seller wants the highest price and the buyer wants the lowest price. (At least in our capitalist system.)

That said, I wouldn't purposely take advantage of an individual's ignorance.

And that said, I must admit that I purchased a five thousand dollar painting from Goodwill for just twenty dollars. I had no idea who painted the work; I simply liked it. As I have no intention of selling the piece, its value to me is still a twenty dollar pleasure to the eye.
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Posted 07/29/2015   12:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add cjpalermo1964 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The parties' positions are not equal because--at least in online auctions--the seller possesses the item and is in a superior position to know all features of the specific example, and/or disclose all facts pertaining to identification and condition. The buyer can and should obtain knowledge about the item in general, but can never know everything about this particular offered example. Therefore, the seller has a higher duty, to disclose, than the buyer does to learn.
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Posted 07/29/2015   2:24 pm  Show Profile Check 1typesetter's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 1typesetter to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
That said, I wouldn't purposely take advantage of an individual's ignorance.


KGB - I'm confused. If I'm bidding in an auction and I win an item at far less than value, am I "tak[ing] advantage of an individual's ignorance."?
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Posted 07/29/2015   2:57 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add KGB to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
typesetter, my statement is meant in a more general way than the focus of this discussion. I think an auction on eBay is a special circumstance, one in which the seller accepts the company's policies. So long as the seller does not misrepresent the item for sale, the buyer is required to make payment. At the same time, the seller is required to provide the item to said buyer.

Breaking this agreement, from either side, is discourteous and should lead to negative consequences. That's why I think an escrow amount should be collected in advance from sellers on eBay.

As an aside, I have actually warned sellers that they are listing an item for far too little. I wouldn't step in and do this after the sale was made, however.

What do they say? "A deal's a deal."
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Edited by KGB - 07/29/2015 2:58 pm
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Posted 07/29/2015   4:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jarnick to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have made mistakes in listing stamps for sale and have always considered it my problem and eaten the error. For instance, a gem C18, Baby Zepp, MNH got listed for 30c and a lucky buyer got the bargain of the year. If I've made a error and selling too cheap, tough.
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Posted 07/31/2015   3:04 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add GregAlex to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Once a bid has been made, if the seller notices an error can they add a reserve or cancel the auction? As a seller, I have increased a minimum bid after an auction was running, but there were no bids yet.
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Posted 07/31/2015   9:16 pm  Show Profile Check paperhistory's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add paperhistory to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It's incumbent on the seller - when they are a professional or the sale is in open forum like eBay. The circumstances are different when you are a professional or knowledgeable buyer and you are dealing with a layperson (for example, when you're the bourse dealer and someone walks in with Uncle Bob's collection).

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