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Sweden, Europ. Nature Conservation Year 1970 issue Question  
 

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Pillar Of The Community
Czech Republic
552 Posts
Posted 03/02/2016   04:28 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add florian to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
KuoLC5310 in his post of 02/24/2016 7:23 pm on the Same stamp - different value thread featured a rather unusual multicolour pair: Sweden, European Nature Conservation Year, May 11, 1970 ( http://goscf.com/t/20223&whichpage=9#414820 ).

I have been trying to spot any differences in the identical colour scheme between the two stamps in my collection and indeed there are very very few there and, moreover, these are minute. The most conspicuous one appears to be the small parallelogram below the letter S in the inscription NATURVARDSARET: the parallelogram consists of blue lines in the 55 ore value while that in the 70 ore one has lines which are violet in colour.

Strangely enough, his pair presents the same differences as mine.

A most remarkable set for the printing process used. Could someone provide more information about technical details regarding this issue and explain the differences?

Note the misregister visible along the left frame of the 55 ore value where only the intaglio in black and violet appears. The set in my collection does not present this printing defect.
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Edited by florian - 03/02/2016 05:27 am

Pillar Of The Community
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4387 Posts
Posted 03/02/2016   9:18 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lithograving to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Florian, when I first saw these stamps I said to myself what the heck is this miss mash?
Not excactly one of my favourite stamp designs but it kind
of grows on you.

Sweden Scott 851



Sweden Scott 852




I also have have a few questions about the printing process.

Who was the printer?

The PFA Stamp Printing Works in 1970 used a 3 colour recess Goebel press which was acquired in 1964.
http://goscf.com/t/36300

It wasn't until 1983 that a 10 colour (6 recess, 4 offset) Goebel press was installed at the PFA.


I see blue, violet, slate green, red brown and black.
Therefore I wonder was another 5 colour press used?
Perhaps the 3 colour Goebel was modified to print up to five or even six colours?

Or were 3 inks applied in combination to give the "camaieu" effect?
http://goscf.com/t/39442

Maybe they made two passes through the press 3 + 2 Colours (inks)

Or were they contracted out to a foreign printer?

The Swedish Post Office used Harrison & Sons to print photogravure stamps, Enschede for combination recess/offset and the
Bank of Finland Security Printing House for some multicolour recess work.

In the colour scheme of things I notice that the country name SVERIGE on the 55 is not black but green black whereas the SVERIGE 70 is black.

Also both values have the same misregistration of the red brown colour on the lower right below the frame line.

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Edited by lithograving - 03/23/2018 3:45 pm
Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 03/03/2016   08:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
lithograving - Thanks for your blow-ups of both values which are most helpful.

E.g. drop a perpendicular from the second R in NATURVARDSARET to the enclosure near the bottom line of either stamp where you can see slate? lines blending into red brown ones in the 55 öre value and brown? lines blending into red brown ones in the 70 öre value.

Or note the way the colours change in both the values when dropping perpendiculars from the letter N in NATURVARDSARET and from the middle of the letter R in SVERIGE.

Then there is the slate of the mass next to the last E in SVERIGE and the black of the bolder in the middle beneath the TUR in NATURVARDSARET as well as the black of the crack in it closer to to the RIG in SVERIGE.

The misregisters in both yours and KuoLC5310's examples also tell a story.
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Edited by florian - 03/03/2016 08:51 am
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Posted 03/03/2016   10:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lithograving to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The misregisters in both yours and KuoLC5310's examples also tell a story.


I found a used 70ore which has the same misregistration.




Florian, so are you suggesting that there were 2 passes
through the 3 colour Goebel to achieve these 5? colours?

Or did the printers combine just 3 inks and came up with
the right mix and overlapping on one plate and single
pass through the press?

When the British American Bank Note Co started printing Canadian stamps again in 1968
they bought a Goebel press in 1966/67 capable of printing 3 recess and 4 photogravure colours.

In the article The Goebel Press Era Of Canadian Stamps,
Ken Sargent states

The Swedish Post Office created a fourth intaglio colour
for their booklets containing a fourth denomination by
"double inking" the fourth area to produce a distinct,
darker colour
.
This was never tried on the Goebel press in Canada.

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Edited by lithograving - 03/23/2018 3:48 pm
Pillar Of The Community
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552 Posts
Posted 03/04/2016   07:23 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
lithograving - Your blow-ups and details are a joy to view and examine! Naturally, unused stamps serve the purpose better (that was why I began to concentrate on those mints of interest to me some 50 years ago).

Pity that KuoLC5310's scans lack higher definition. Note the shift to the right of the colours in his scan ( http://goscf.com/t/20223&whichpage=9#414820 ) of the 55 öre value beginning where you raise the perpendicular above the middle of the letter H in HUGO ZUHR del. Beginning at the bottom, to the left of this perpendicular you can observe the violet colour next to the letters SV in SVERIGE while the blue colour next to the S only begins to the right of it and so do the slate green and red brown above it, the black of the crack in the bolder next to the R in SVERIGE again appears to the left of the perpendicular as well as the gray of the rock mass next to the E in SVERIGE while to the right of it the rock mass turns into black.

IMO this could be evidence of two passes through the press because it is confirmed by the misregister of the red brown above CZ. SLANIA sc. in your scans.

My pair hardly shows any defects in registration (at least I believe so lacking any blow-ups similar to yours).

What you say about Ken Sarget's article mentioning "a fourth intaglio colour for /Swedish/ booklets containing a fourth denomination by "double inking" the fourth area to produce a distinct, darker colour" is very interesting. This would be an instance of a "camaieu" and might explain instances of colour tones occurring in these NATURVARDSARET 1970 stamps!

Could you show the booklet pane in question?

Cheers!

Florian
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Edited by florian - 03/04/2016 07:48 am
Pillar Of The Community
Canada
4387 Posts
Posted 03/05/2016   7:11 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lithograving to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Florian, Ken Sargent did not mention any particular
Swedish booklet in his article.

I can only guess as to which booklets he was referring to
just by looking through the booklets
Sweden issued during the 1970s.

First lets look at a Canadian booklet printed
by BABN in 1987 using the Goebel press.

Canada Scott/Unitrade 948a (BK 92a)



3 colours recess, one photogravure cylinder for the tagging
and one to print the green lines on the booklet selvage.





Now here is a Swedish booklet pane from 1974.
Scott 1087 - 1091



5 colours printed by one steel-engraved printing cylinder with 3 inking units/fountains

1087 - crimson
1088 - blue
1089 - dark olive green
1090 - slate green
1091 - brown

I believe that the 3 basic colours were crimson, blue and slate green.
The printer combined crimson + slate green = brown
blue + slate green = dark olive green

In this detail from Scott 1091 brown, the crimson/red is clearly visible as are traces of dark green waves by the docks.





This is purely a guess on my part since I'm
not a colour specialist.
Anyone have any opinions as to how these extra
colours were produced?

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Edited by lithograving - 03/23/2018 4:12 pm
Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 03/05/2016   7:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lithograving to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here is another example where I believe that dark red and
green were combined to produce Scott 1043 the 30ore dark brown.

Sweden 1974 booklet pane Scott 1041 - 1044

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Edited by lithograving - 03/23/2018 4:21 pm
Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 03/06/2016   8:11 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lithograving to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Scott lists Sweden # 1027 as multicolored.

And multicoloured it is.



But I believe it was printed by combining only 3 inks to produce
five or six colours using only one recess cylinder and one pass through the Goebel press.

This is common and easy to achieve in photogravure (or offset litho)
where you have multiple cylinders, one colour per cylinder;
but a more complicated process when printing
multicoloured engraved stamps by way of only one printing
cylinder and 3 inking units and one pass through
the printing press.

It's basically the Giori process but one step further.

I belive that only the 3 primary colours magenta, yellow, and cyan were used to print this multicoloured engraved stamp
by overlapping/double inking/camaieu effect or whatever
term you want to call it.

Notice in this detail how the colours such as blue and yellow blend into green.
Or dark golden yellow and magenta/red into orange.

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Edited by lithograving - 03/23/2018 4:26 pm
Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 03/07/2016   09:59 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
lithograving - This is what has never occurred to me: a true discovery. Thanks!

Inferring from from what Ken Sargent mentioned about the Swedish Post Office creating a fourth intaglio colour for their booklets by "double inking" the fourth area, you are no doubt right in thinking that 4-colour booklets were printed by one steel-engraved printing cylinder with 3 inking units/fountains such as Scott Sweden 1041 - 1044 ( http://goscf.com/t/48221#416485 ) and even 5-colour booklets such as Scott Sweden 1087 - 1091 ( http://goscf.com/t/48221#416464 ) where 5 colours were printed by one steel-engraved printing cylinder with only 3 inking units/fountains .

As for the Goose Girl, Scott Sweden # 1027 ( http://goscf.com/t/48221#416738 ), you are lucky to possess an example in perfect register, mine is out of register and so is the one shown by Anthony UK ( http://goscf.com/t/7502&whichpage=18#101322 ) where the yellow and blue overlap extend beyond the frame at the top and along the left-hand side of the stamp and the red under the boy's arms is out of register as well, which accounts for two plates, IMO.

The same applies to the 85-öre value of the Only One World issue. Again, yours ( http://goscf.com/t/9106&whichpage=38#157375 ) is an example in perfect register while mine is out of register, the red brown orange shifted to the right and overlapping extending beyond the frame of the stamp. The shift is particularly marked in the flowers in the green grass where the red brown orange colour is quite out of register.

Again, great scans! Cheers!
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Edited by florian - 03/08/2016 04:24 am
Valued Member
United Kingdom
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Posted 03/07/2016   11:45 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add 65170 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
My brain is not up to commenting on overlapping colours today, so have a look at http://www.theburinofczeslawslania....weden73.html where there are proofs of the Goose Girl. The page states: "This stamp is composed of two different plates, one for black lines*, other for offset** colours. See below examples of two die plates."

I think this implies one for intaglio (*black lines) and one for "report" (**offset).

The more I believe I have grasped this subject the more confused I become! GLENN
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Posted 03/07/2016   12:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lithograving to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Florian, so we agree on the UPU booklet block Sc 1041 - 1044
and maybe on Scott 1087 - 1091.

As for Scott 1027 the Goose Girl now that you
mention misregistration on your copy and AnthonyUK's
I totally agree that it must have been achieved with two
plates and two passes.

Here is mine side beside Anthony's used copy.




Thanks Glenn for that link which proves that 2 plates
were used.
I don't understand why black lines are mentioned.
since I can't see any black colour on this stamp.
Maybe he meant dark colours.
Possibly he is refering to direct intaglio (deep colours)
and indirect intaglio (offset) light colours.

We discussed this a couple of years ago on
French Government Printer thread.
See here:
http://goscf.com/t/40873&whichpage=1

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Edited by lithograving - 03/23/2018 4:29 pm
Pillar Of The Community
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552 Posts
Posted 03/08/2016   02:20 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
65170 - Glenn, I apologize for my poor English. I have replaced overlap, which was quite wrong as you made me see, with extend beyond for lack of a better expression. Thanks a lot. I always appreciate corrections of my mistakes.

Many thanks as well for the link which makes matters clearer.
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Edited by florian - 03/08/2016 04:06 am
Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 03/08/2016   07:02 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The link http://www.theburinofczeslawslania....weden73.html Glenn has provided is invaluable even though the artist's proofs do not appear to be the definitive version. Just consider the plate for offset colours where the yellow diagonal lines below the swan's bill go in different direction from that on the actual stamp (compare http://goscf.com/t/7502&whichpage=18#101322 ).

So there is no doubt that two plates were used: one providing the colouring in yellow, red and blue, the other for the contours in red brown, dark brown and blackish green (see the red brown for the contours of the boy's and the girl's bodies and the dark brown and blackish green inside the letter G in SVERIGE or next to the digit 1 in 10 KR and in the CZE in CZESLAW SLANIA at the bottom of the stamp.

Considering the crisp and shiny appearance of the yellow colour observed under a 10X magnifying glass quite unlike that found in the matt colours of the indirect intaglio (offset intaglio) found in the 1985 issue honouring Nobel Prize Winners in Literature ( http://goscf.com/t/7502&whichpage=18#100483 ) I would be inclined to believe that both the plates, the one for colouring in yellow, red and blue as well as the other for contours in red brown, dark brown and blackish green were printed by the direct intaglio technique, one after another.

Just consider the lower edge of the girl's dress turning from red brown into blue or, on the other hand, the green ( = overlapping yellow and blue), red brown and blue of the girl's raised shoulder out of register as well as the doubled contours of the girl's face out of register, too, in http://goscf.com/t/7502&whichpage=18#101322 .

My own used example of the stamp presents an even more pronounced shift of the yellow, red and blue colours upwards making the whole three lines in blue in the upper right-hand corner of the stamp extend above the frame of the stamp.

BTW, it is interesting to note that the artist´s proof made with two die plates together http://www.theburinofczeslawslania....weden73.html shows much the same misregister as found in Anthony UK's example http://goscf.com/t/7502&whichpage=18#101322 .

lithograving and 65170 - Glenn, thank you very much for taking part in this discussion.

Florian
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Edited by florian - 03/08/2016 07:50 am
Valued Member
United States
69 Posts
Posted 03/23/2018   4:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Seigaku to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I came to appreciate the mastery of Czeslaw Slania's engraving thanks to the late Harold Short who was active in a society dedicated to studying his work. Of the many microscopically precise Slania engravings I have seen, the seeming crudity of this 1970 Swedish design is remarkable. Based on Slania's body of work, it is safe to say that the engraving is EXACTLY what he intended it to be. It is sad that we are no longer able to ask Harold about this, but I hope that a member of the Slania Society may know something about the seemingly anomalous engraving style used for this image.
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Pillar Of The Community
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4387 Posts
Posted 03/25/2018   9:42 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add lithograving to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Seigaku

It's a pleasure to see another collector interested in
the fine art of stamp engraving.
Please share with us any images or stories about Slania or
any other engraver for that matter.
BTW who was Harold Short ?
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Valued Member
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Posted 03/25/2018   11:49 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Seigaku to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Harold Short did the newsletter for the Western Philatelic Library (SF Bay area), and was very active in the Slania Society. He died very suddenly about 10+ years ago, and all of us who knew him still miss him. I don't have any Slania material myself, but Harold regularly showed Slania's work to our stamp club.

By the way, some people may not know that Slania is pronounced "Swania." Just thought I would mention it.
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