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Germany WWII Pow Covers

 
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Pillar Of The Community
Canada
6505 Posts
Posted 01/15/2017   4:50 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add jamesw to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Appreciate any help anyone can give me on these. Purchased in a lot at an estate auction yesterday, and not really my thing.
A set - 8, though two of them may not be POW - of covers and cards from Stalag VIIa. Did find some websites regarding the stalag...

www.moosburg.org/info/stalag/indeng.html#stalag

The covers themselves were labeled but the previous owner as 4 types. The first two types are folded letters, similar to aerogrammes, and the second two types are post cards (more like heavy paper response cards). The first three types are German, but the last set is definitely Hungarian. The Hungarian cards do not have the Stalag mark on them (which makes me wonder if they are in fact POW) but do have the Nazi Feldpost stamp.

Have a look...

Type 1



Type 2



Type 3



Type 4. As I said, these are Hungarian, and much different, but were lumped by the consigner in with this group.



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Pillar Of The Community
Canada
4583 Posts
Posted 01/17/2017   3:09 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bujutsu to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Jamesw

The information I have of German POW camps states Stalag VIIA to have been located in Moosburg, Bavaria.

My information on the "Feldpost" cancels are scanty at this time.

Chimo

Bujutsu
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Pillar Of The Community
Canada
6505 Posts
Posted 01/17/2017   10:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jamesw to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Bujutsu.
The link I posted above (which didn't seem to want to be a link) is to an interesting site about the camp, even lists a number of prisoners. The fellow who wrote these doesn't seem to be on the list though.
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Pillar Of The Community
Czech Republic
610 Posts
Posted 01/19/2017   08:36 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
jamesw - The last two items of yours are inscribed in Hungarian as follows:

Top right:

TÁBORI POSTAI LEVELEZŐLAP
Fieldpost Postcard

Top left:

Magyarország jővő békessége és felvirágzása -
Hungary desires peace and prosperity -
a szovjetoroszországi harcmezőkőn dől el!
Soviet Russian troops, clear off!

Bottom right:

A cimzett csapattestének, alakulatának megnevezése
Any indication of the formation or unit the addressee belongs to
szigorúan tilos!
is strictly prohibited!


The first was sent on March 28, 1943 by Irén (= Irene) Barayai from Makó (south Hungary) to Soldier János (= John) Harscás, Fieldpost No. 112/11.

The second on July 22, 1943 by Báliunt (= Valentine) Mágori from Makó to the same addressee, Fieldpost No. F/491.

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Edited by florian - 01/19/2017 08:53 am
Pillar Of The Community
United States
523 Posts
Posted 01/23/2017   11:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add danko to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
What I was able to find is that Petrovgrad is in Serbia. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zrenjanin

And based on the name Danica Dimitrov the recipient is a female and is likely Serbian.

I'm really surprised that Nazis allowed POWs to write letters, at least to the occupied territories.

THe sender's last name is Dimitrov too, can't make out the first name.

Add Serbia to the topic line, and someone from Serbia may help you more.
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Pillar Of The Community
Czech Republic
610 Posts
Posted 01/24/2017   10:23 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
danko - The sender's names read Svetozar Dumitrov. The addressee was Ms. Danica Dumitrov, Petrovgrad, Kumanovska 1, Serbia (Banat).

The handwritten note on the third cover (bottom left) reads Dobila 12.VIII.43 = Received on Aug. 12, 1943.

The circular rubber stamps in blue featuring the emblem of Hitler's Germany on items 5 and 6 are inscribed Strafgericht Breslau 183/4 = Criminal Court Breslau 183/4 (now Wroclaw, Poland).
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Edited by florian - 01/25/2017 06:18 am
Pillar Of The Community
United States
523 Posts
Posted 01/24/2017   12:16 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add danko to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
When you look at the piece of history like these covers, so many questions going through your mind. Like what is Svetozar's relationship to Danica (was she his wife, mother sister)?. Was he an imprisoned solder of the Yugoslavian army, or a partisan, or a political prisoner, or maybe imprisoned for some minor criminal offences? Did any of them survived the war? I wouldn't think that these covers have a very significant monetary value, but they are priceless parts of history.
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Pillar Of The Community
Czech Republic
610 Posts
Posted 01/25/2017   06:29 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
danko - Sadly, Strafgericht Breslau used to mean either guillotine or concentration camp for the unlucky people.
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Edited by florian - 01/25/2017 06:30 am
Pillar Of The Community
669 Posts
Posted 01/25/2017   09:45 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add graphis to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
danko...POW's were entitled to mail etc according to the Geneva Convention:Art. 36. Each of the belligerents shall fix periodically the number of letters and postcards which prisoners of war of different categories shall be permitted to send per month, and shall notify that number to the other belligerent. These letters and cards shall be sent by post by the shortest route. They may not be delayed or withheld for disciplinary motives.
Not later than one week after his arrival in camp, and similarly in case of sickness, each prisoner shall be enabled to send a postcard to his family informing them of his capture and the state of his health. The said postcards shall be forwarded as quickly as possible and shall not be delayed in any manner. As a general rule, the correspondence of prisoners shall be written in their native language. Belligerents may authorize correspondence in other languages.
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Edited by graphis - 01/25/2017 09:46 am
Pillar Of The Community
United States
523 Posts
Posted 01/25/2017   9:18 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add danko to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
graphis

It didn't seems that Nazis cared much about Geneva Conventions, did they? Does anyone know if Russian POW's could send letters to Russia, and if the could, would NKVD allow these letters to go through. From what I know, in Russia during WWII POW's were considered traitors, and were at least prosecuted if not executed.

florian

Who knows. Based on the dates from cancels, he managed to survive there for quite some time. I think that the earliest one I see is 21/1/42, and the latest 11/8/43. One of them actually looks like 44. So if he survived that long... Unless of course they executed every one in the camp before Allied/Russian forces arrived in 1945.
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Pillar Of The Community
Czech Republic
610 Posts
Posted 01/26/2017   10:34 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add florian to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
danko - You are right. One of the cancels does look like year 1944. As Types 1 and 2 are actually folded letters, it would be easy to confirm the year.

What I find strange is the fact the P.O.W. postcards bear the ominous Strafgericht Breslau rubber stamps.
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Edited by florian - 01/26/2017 10:35 am
Pillar Of The Community
Canada
6505 Posts
Posted 04/05/2020   10:20 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jamesw to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I've been revisiting these items, and since the images in the original post have gone walkabout, I'll replace them.
I'll put them in the original order for continuity, but I don't know how the original owner came up with these 'categories' since the dates are out of sync.

Type 1



Type 2



Type 3



Type 4



What are called Type 3 here are actually there items being post marked in 1942 and baring the dreaded blue Strafgericht Breslau marking. It would appear the sender got off lucky (if one can call it that) and was sent to the concentration camp (Stalag VIIA). The later items were post marked 1942 (the Type 1's) and 1943 and 44 (the Type 2's).

The Type 4's are definitely Hungarian in origin, both post marked 1943, and entirely different animals.

Thanks to all the previous posters for their information.
Anything new would be appreciated. I'm totally out of my depth with these.
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Edited by jamesw - 04/05/2020 10:20 pm
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