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Posted 10/21/2017   08:45 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jimwentzell to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Hal,

My sentiments are similar regarding Prexie covers. I'm way in the beginning of the learning curve, and I STILL haven't officially added Prexie Covers to my collecting interests. But that will likely change soon!

Yea, staying up waaaay too late and posting stuff DOES lead to many typos......I've edited nearly EVERY POST I've made the next day after my brain has rested!

Thank goodness for that 24-hour editing window!

I'm kind of self-conscious about typos and spelling errors. Someone told me this about adding apostrophes where none are needed: It's not NECESSARY to add one if it's describing its characteristics!

--Jim Wentzell
stampguyaps177-681
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Edited by jimwentzell - 10/21/2017 08:49 am
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Posted 10/22/2017   11:51 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add j_rogers to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hal,

Great thread! Here are two items from my accumulation. They are some sort of customs processing pieces from WW2.

Any thoughts on how the rates were determined?




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Posted 10/22/2017   5:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Stampman2002 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here's a few for this thread.

First up is a combination 803-804, paying the 1.5 cent rate. Both are precancelled for Harrisburg, PA and what I really like is who the sender was.





Next is a neat cover. It features a bust of Washington in the area where you would normally find the corner card, a nice strip of three of the one cent Washington stamp and it is cancelled in Washington MO.





The final entry for the one cent Washington stamp is this use on POD Form 3817, with a later usage, in 1952.





For the two cent, let's start with a Territorial use from Hawaii in 1953, in a postcard.






Paying the drop letter rate is the next item, on an illustrated advertising cover:





For the workhorse of the Prexies, I offer three items. The first is on an illustrated advertising cover. (Yes, I like multicolored advertising covers!).





The next cover is a rather dingy looking cover, as well it should be. Note the post office rubber stamp "RUN OVER BY TRAIN AT SALEM OHIO."





The final entry for the workhorse is this piece sent to a soldier who, at the time of arrival of the letter, was spending time in the guardhouse for some infraction of military rules. Interesting piece of military jailhouse mail.




The next one is a scarce usage from a military base overseas on a postcard. This rate, according to the exhibit page this came from, was only in use a short period. This has the four cent Madison stamp.





The airmail rate is shown here is a first flight cover with a solo use of the six-cent stamp.




Another airmail use is marked by this solo eight cent use on cover, going from a sailor at sea to an officer in Coronado, Calif. Naval censor marking clears the cover.




Next up is the ten cent Tyler paying the international rate, via air mail, to Mexico. Not the prettiest of covers, but still a nice solo use.





The next item, rated twenty-four cents, is paid by a six cent airmail postal stationery and the eighteen cent Grant for an almost solo use. This pays the registration fee and return receipt fee, as well as the postage. It is also a censored cover.






The next cover uses two twenty cent stamps to pay the airmail rate to Noumea and back to USA on a first flight cover from San Francisco. The discoloration at left is from the plastic holder I used to scan it when I was first learning to scan items...





The twenty-five is shown in an uncommon use, paying for registration on a prepaid business reply envelope.





The coil stamps are represented next. The first is a two-cent drop rate cover.





The second item is a joint line pair of the three cent coil, paying the airmail rate.





The final cover is one of my favorites for this period. It is mailed, via clipper, on Feb 23, 1943, with routing instructions where the return address would normally be. The multiple franking totals forty-five cents to cover the international mail to Switzerland and registration fees. It was censored and returned to sender as service to Switzerland was no longer available due to the war in Europe.



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Posted 10/22/2017   6:56 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Hal to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Nice covers, Basil!
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Posted 10/22/2017   7:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Stampman2002 writes about the first cover in his recent post:


Quote:
and what I really like is who the sender was.


Elmer R. Long was a stamp dealer. The cover above with the 2 Prexy precancels appears to predate 1950 due to the different address.



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Posted 10/22/2017   7:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Hal to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Really nice covers, Stampman2002! And I really love the covers from the "GUARD HOUSE" and "RUN OVER BY A TRAIN"-- for some reason those made me chuckle. I can see why you really like the "RETURN TO SENDER-NO SERVICE AVAILABLE".


Quote:
scarce usage from a military base overseas on a postcard. This rate, according to the exhibit page this came from, was only in use a short period.

The 4c AIRMAIL Postal Card and Post Card Domestic & MPO Rate was effective from November 1, 1953 thru July 31, 1958. The 4c Surface Post Card Rate did not come into effect until the 1963. The hope that helps explains the rate.
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Posted 10/22/2017   11:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Hal to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
j_rogers
Both pieces are great examples of MPO (Military Post Office) Customs Declarations used by the U.S. Navy in the Pacific Theatre of Operations during WWII, pursuant to VCNO #2885516 (Vice Chief of Naval Operations Order 2885516) and ALNAV 147 (ALL NAVY Personnel Order 147). Navy personnel had to attest that the items being sent home were their personnel property.


PIECE I
The 50˘ William Howard Taft Sc#831 is tied by a red-violet straight-line "PARCEL POST handstamp." The Parcel Post Rate from the Pacific would have been Zone 8 to the United States. The Zone 8 Parcel Post Rates was 15c for the first pound and 11c for each additional pound. Insurance was 10c/20c/30c/50c/60c/70c. As you can see, any combination of rates would not add-up to the 50c appearing on the Form. A clue to the actual rate may be to the set of numbers adjoining the stamp to the left, or under the cellophane tape, to the right. In either case, there appear to be stamps missing and the piece is incomplete or was overpaid for convenience by two cents, which seems possible from a military zone.




PIECE II
A red-violet straight-line "AIR MAIL" hand stamp ties the 2˘ John Adams Sc #806. A special six-cent airmail rate was granted U.S. Armed Forces serving outside the continental United States, from December 25, 1941 thru September 30, 1946. At the Six Cent Rate, the package weighed 17 pounds--so that was one extremely heavy necklace, bracelet and 2 packs of gum! So, I doubt that this accurate, unless the gum was "natural gum rubber." Let's look at it another way.

I suspect he mailing was "AIRMAIL-INSURED". That would make it either a two lb. or a seven lb. package. Seven pounds would be $0.42, with $0.60 Insurance covering $100 to $150 loss, for $1.02, which still sounds really heavy for what is declared. Two pounds would be $0.12, and then taking the maximum insurance of $0.70 for up to $200 loss, you only get $0.82…you're short twenty cents.

Again, my guess is a piece of the puzzle is missing because this is a partial wrapper and markings may be missing.

If anyone has other suggestions based on the Insured Rate Period of March 26, 1944 thru December 31, 1948, or the Military Air Mail Rate of December 25, 1941 thru September 30, 1946, please advise.

Thanks,
Hal
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Edited by Hal - 10/22/2017 11:42 pm
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Posted 11/05/2017   06:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hornet785 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi,

Different ways to send messages.

By mail or Outlook!

Best regards

Hornet


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Posted 11/12/2017   10:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add j_rogers to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Hal for the explanation and evaluation of the rates.

My thinking was thrown off by the punched holes at the top of the sheets that led me to believe that these were officially filed or recorded and the stamps were used to pay some sort of fee.

I guess the recipient of the package must have been a stamp collector.
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Posted 02/11/2018   08:53 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stampfan9 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
For the topic:

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Posted 03/04/2018   07:03 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stampfan9 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Does anyone know what the notations at the top and center are referring to on the
Gene Autry cover? Thanks.
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Posted 03/04/2018   07:15 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Moyock13 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
When googled it comes up as an address.
49 7th St, Honolulu, HI 96819
Somewhere in the Fort Shafter area of Honolulu.
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Posted 03/04/2018   11:07 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The line at the top center is the last line of the return address:
"Honolulu 49, T.H."
which is postal zone 49 of Honolulu, Territory of Hawaii

Postal Zones were introduced in mid 1943 in over 100 US cities to help mail sorting due to a shortage of trained mail clerks due to the draft.

The Zone Numbers are the direct forerunners to the zip codes to the early 1960s, often converted by adding 3 prefix digits to the Zone Number. Thus I would not be surprised if the address today has the zip code of 96849.
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Edited by John Becker - 03/04/2018 11:18 am
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Posted 09/11/2019   10:34 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add PostalCardCachet to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hal,

"Huss Estate"? Please send/post more details. When was this? Your posting is the very first I am aware of that identified Diana as Huss's wife. Before this, I had no idea who she was. I have done a good bit of research on the late Alberta Goff of Oshkosh, WI. Goff never met any of Huss's other artists. I still don't know who L.I. Olsen was. I am in the process of scanning all of my Huss covers with a goal of putting them and many of my other FDC's on-line sometime in October. Doug Henkle, Ripon, WI
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Posted 12/10/2019   02:59 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add PostalCardCachet to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Followup to: John Becker, Posted - 10/22/2017 : 7:03 pm

For more Elmer R. Long "Collector's Handbook" front covers with cartoons mostly by Cachetmaker John Coulthard, see a page I created as part of an ongoing set of mostly FDC related pages that went public 10-08-2019, called the "Cachet Display Catalog".

http://www.folklib.net/fdc/bibliog/...r-long.shtml

and a page for Coulthard,
http://www.folklib.net/fdc/makers/coulthard.shtml

also, all 52 Jacques Minkus patriotics displayed on one page,
http://www.folklib.net/fdc/makers/minkus/catalog/

See my other "Huss estate?" post: 09/11/2019 : 10:34 am
Doug
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