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Scott J81....Postage due stamps  
 

 
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Posted 11/07/2018   11:28 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add wert to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Got this sheet (well almost sheet) that looks lie they have been maybe precanceled..?

The second stamp is lifted a bit and it seems to have complete gum...They are on what seems to be the so called peel and stick type stamps.

Bottom line question..Are these new stamps precanceled..???

P.S...Another stupid question from a Canadian..haha





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Posted 11/07/2018   2:19 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
All US postage due stamps have water-activated gum. There are no self adhesive US dues, regardless of the backing you find them on.

Sheet stock like yours is commonly used to balance accounts for business reply mail where the stamps would be affixed to a receipt or the top piece of a bundle of mail or even left loose. Finding used due stamps with full gum is very common. There are several threads on the board about uses of large blocks and whole sheets of due stamps.

To speed the process, due stamps were commonly precanceled with a variety of canceling devices meant for other purposes. Those are called provisional precancels. But in your case. note the ink in the perforation hole of the M of MAR on the pair, which indicates your stamps are post-canceled and are not precancels.
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Posted 11/07/2018   2:22 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks buddy..

Robert
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Posted 11/08/2018   3:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add eligies to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Just a thought: The stamps are not 'pre-printed' pre cancels but rather a dues clerk took a sheet of 100 from stock, placed on a flat surface hand cancelled the date & killer, then moistened & placed on the item. It could have been done to protect the items contained in the package from being damaged. When delivered to the addressee, the owed postage would have been collected.
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Posted 11/08/2018   4:05 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add revenuermd to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
This item was probably NOT attached to something that was sent out, but as has already been suggested, it was presented in the post office to someone who owed that amount for a bundle of business reply mail. Actually it probably never left the post office at that time and later when it was time to scrap the pile of cancelled stamps, it was disposed of to a local stamp collector.

Many years ago full sheets like this were a regular part of the auctions at the meetings of the Bucksmont Stamp Club, billed as scrapings from the auctioneer's closet. He opined that they were of very little value, but there usually was a lively bidding war to own these sheets.
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Ron Lesher
Edited by revenuermd - 11/08/2018 4:28 pm
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Posted 11/08/2018   5:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
From my collection.
Sheets of 100, 30c and 50c.

Postage Due Bill Follow Sheet
Form 3582a -F
"Name of Patron"
5-10613 U.S Government Printing Office

CDS Circular Date Stamp Postmarked Chicago Illinois
Parcel Post Delivery.

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Edited by rod222 - 11/08/2018 5:57 pm
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Posted 11/10/2018   10:08 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add postagedueguy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
These sheets and blocks of J75 were used to pay a postage due bill of $103.50 (this was a lot of money in the middle of the depression!) for the Curtis Publishing Company of Philadelphia, PA. in 1930 or 31. There were 4 plates used to print J75 (20226, 20227, 20228, and 20229) with only 1000(!!!!!) impressions each. These were 400 subject plates. 4 x 400 x 1000 = 1,600,000 stamps. These were used up very quickly. J75 was issued on January 28,1931 and withdrawn on October 17,1932.



J75 sheet plate 20226 #1




J75 plate 20226 #2



J75 plate 20225 #3



J75 plate 20227 & 20228 #4
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Edited by postagedueguy - 11/10/2018 10:09 pm
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Posted 11/11/2018   09:35 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Dale Kramer to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
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Posted 11/12/2018   11:00 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add postagedueguy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply


This is a precanceled sheet of J76 plate 20229
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