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Perforation Errors - Expert Help Needed

 
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Posted 01/25/2019   1:20 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add SewallH to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
There are many types of perforation errors of course, the most obvious being when the perforation is omitted (leading to an imperforate stamp) or the perforation is mistakenly cut through the body of the stamp, for instance.

What I am finding with a number of my stamps is that the perforation gauge does not match the publicly listed stamp description. For instance, I recently measured the perforation gauge on a lovely US #RW-- duck stamp and found that all sides of the stamp were not of the correct perforation gauge. In some cases the difference from the officially stated gauge measure at 0.15 perforations up to 0.25. I have found perforation difference versus stamp specifications at up to 0.5. In several cases the opposite sides of the stamp had perforation gauges that did not even match, something I thought strange as wouldn't all vertical or horizontal perforation cuts on a printed stamp page be done by the same machine at basically the same time in the same manner.

I asked a well respected expert in philately about this and he indicated that sometimes the stamp catalogue have the perforation information listed incorrectly. But what I am finding is a bit beyond that. I am finding what I would think are meaningful perforation gauge "errors", if I may call them that.

So what the heck is going on. Some stamps show different varieties based on their differences in perforation gauges. What happens when a stamp is supposed to be 11 by 11, but the stamp you have measures 11.2 by 11 by 11.15 by 11. Or it measures 11.10 by 11.15 by 11.19 by 11.40.

I use multiple professional computer perforation software tools do do the perforation gauge measurements. So I double check the measurements. On the majority of my stamps, the perforation gauge on a stamp as measured by computer analysis are absolutely on the mark correct with the published stamp specifications. There is nothing wrong with the computer systems I use that are doing the measurements. I could never do this type of precision work reliably using a hand held gauge by eye.

My expert friend indicated to me in his opinion that any gauge measurement that was 0.1 off the stated specification is a stamp production error. I have no basis as to opine on the validity of this viewpoint. Maybe the correct view is that 0.25 is the necessary deviation from specifications to create a bona fide error.

So are these few stamps that I find like this actually new undocumented varieties? I find that most people do not even bother measuring perforation gauge on their stamps unless the stamp literature already has defined a separate variety based on perforation differences. Why even bother measuring the perforation on a 12 gauge stamp when the stamp has only one listed variety? The stamp must be a 12 gauge stamp by default. So why bother measuring? But low and behold, when I do the measurements, I find that the stamp is not 12 gauge at all.

I really need some advice on this matter. Anyone have any thoughts? I can post image of some stamps that have the above issues.
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Posted 01/25/2019   1:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Sorsh to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
i know about perforation on scandinavian classic stamps, but I have no idea what this duck stamp is, and from what year.
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Posted 01/25/2019   1:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You do not have production errors. The Scott catalogs typically round-off to the nearest 0.5 as an editorial decision.
If you have a specific stamp to discuss, then please, post an image.
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Posted 01/25/2019   1:45 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Sorsh, here in the States folks love to go hunting. Fish, deer etc. One of the favorites is duck hunting. All of these usually need a permit, and they take a stamp. A "duck stamp" goes on a duck hunting permit

Peter
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Posted 01/25/2019   1:48 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ClassicPhilatelist to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
SewallH,
Regarding your Duck stamps (and I assume Federal Duck, not State Duck, but the same will also hold true), one reason you don't see much discussion about the variations is, perf is not used to ID the stamp. With stamps like Franklin-Washington, some of the Bureau issues, some others, Perforation is a key identifier of stamp type. But duck, only one variety is issued each year (technically it is a hunter permit stamp). So now two years of duck stamps ever look alike, so exact perfing of them isn't really required, other than for the purpose of identifying alterations (i.e. reperf) which on a duck stamp I've never seen (though in fairness, I've not spent much time looking for reperfs on Duck stamps).
So finding subtle variations in pref is no surprise at all, but likely of little value or interest to the broader collecting community as a whole. But if you find it interesting, go crazy.
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Posted 01/25/2019   2:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add SewallH to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I just used the duck stamp as an example. I will post that later.

Here is the 1926 Austria #B75. The perforation specifications for this stamp are 12 1/2. My stamp is 12 3/4 perf.

Interesting that Scotts rounds the perf numbers. I did not know that. I will see if I can find examples of the #B75 in 12 1/2 perforation gauge.

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Posted 01/25/2019   2:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
SewallH, most general catalogs round-off perforations. Unless you use a specialized catalog!

Peter
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Posted 01/25/2019   4:08 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add codehappy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
There is also the possibility that the stamp with weird measurements is due to a reperforation job. This might be done on a US duck stamp to hide a natural straight edge, for instance.
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Posted 01/25/2019   4:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Louise411 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I read that certain coil stamps get stretched in making them.
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Posted 01/25/2019   5:42 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rismoney to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
'have no idea what this duck stamp is'

Funny, that's what I say when my kids are around.
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Posted 01/25/2019   8:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add SewallH to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here are two "Duck" (LOL) stamps that have perforations that are not to stated specifications.



The 1985 US #RW50. Stated standard perforations are 11 by 11. This is the published specifications for this #RW stamps. However, this stamp is 10 3/4 by 11 perforations. I have seen this stamp in 11 by 11 perforation format. So this appears to me to not be a case where the perforation count has been "rounded up" on the standard stamp specifications. All the stamps #RW1 through #RW55 are stated as 11 by 11 perforation. For the #RW56 and higher, the stamps are listed as 11 1/2 by 11 , 11 1/4 by 11, or 13 1/4 perforations. So, in the case of this series of stamps, the perforation counts are not necessarily "rounded up" or "rounded down" to the nearest half.



Here is my 1990 US #RW57. The Scott's specification for this stamp are stated as 11 1/2 by 11 perforations. However, my stamp is 11 1/4 by 11 1/4 perforations. This makes no sense in terms of Scott's and other catalogues rounding the perforations in their stamp description. The catalogue round up one perforation and then round down the other perforation? That makes no sense to me.

Anyway, these are two clear examples of perforation errors in these stamps. I am wondering if no one has ever done a thorough evaluation of these perforation variations in these #RW duck stamps. It is quite possible that there are some interesting varieties.

Anyone further thoughts from the astute chat board participants?
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Posted 01/25/2019   8:14 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Forget what the catalog states and put the catalogs away for a moment.

Let's go to the primary source, the stamps themselves. Please, show us two of the same duck stamp aligned side by side with different perforation rates.
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Posted 01/25/2019   9:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
To state that anything is an error first you need to know what the original specifications called for including tolerances.
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Posted 01/25/2019   9:29 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add SewallH to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
here is an example of side by side stamps...the #RW50.

My stamp with 10 3/4 by 11 perforations.



Here is a "regular" stamp with the standard specified 11 by 11 perforations. This is from a stamp currently for sale on eBay.



There is a 0.25 perforation difference the stamps.

Comments?
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Posted 01/25/2019   9:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
No, two stamps side by side in the same scan.
Or at least scan yours against a perforation gauge.
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Posted 01/25/2019   9:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add SewallH to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Please note that the second "Correct" 11 by 11 perf stamp looks skewed. If you click on the stamp image, a proper perspective of the stamp will appear.


this is better I think...


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