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Personal Color Chart Album

 
 
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Posted 02/22/2019   08:05 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add oldbeeg to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I know there have been topics here within various forums that discuss color identification by scanners and software, and by commercial charts and books. I have obtained some books and charts myself. I have not yet run across a discussion of personal color albums, though, and am wondering how many members have created their own?

About 40 years ago, I sat down with a couple thousand stamps and began to sort by paper color, type and weight, the printing process, and the color (28 pages: starting with bright pink and running through the colored grays to black) -- all as identified by then current Scott Catalogues. I also knew that errors in identification could be an issue, both by myself and the folks specifying the catalogue's description, especially when I saw some of the color variations within specific colors. This was an extended process, but I ended up with a personal reference that aided in the identification of some stamps. I used it primarily with my US collection, but at times it was helpful with various topical collections, too.

As I recall, the paper color and type page was occasionally of particular help, but the page after page of varying colors was more satisfying to see. Here is one of the pages:

B.G.
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Posted 02/22/2019   08:22 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Itsjustme7711 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I hadnt thought of including multiple references when available, which has got to add to accuracy significantly.
My ID book started over trying to get a grip on "bluish paper", but I think I'll be expanding with a direction something similar to yours. Thanks!!
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Canada
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Posted 02/22/2019   5:49 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add BlackJag to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Definitely a good idea.

Wish it was Canadian stamps, but your images will work as well.
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Posted 02/22/2019   11:24 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add oldbeeg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Itsjustme, glad it gave you an idea.

BlackJag, it's worldwide, so there are some Canadian in it!

B.G.
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Posted 02/23/2019   08:38 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Boxcar1954 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
oldbeeg, what an interesting idea!
So, label a row for each color type, then match with common stamps so color ID'ed by Scott? Very educational.
Any major dissimilarities within some colors? Were some colors, say blue or green, more consistent?
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Posted 02/23/2019   09:06 am  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Building a true stamp color reference collection is not typically as shown above, you would not mix different countries. You would try to collect mint stamps (if possible) from the same country and series. Used stamps may be helpful but would probably be shown separately since a used stamp color has seen drastically different environmental conditions including soaking.

Applying catalog color names is also dicey. There is absolutely no standard color nomenclature in this hobby. Catalog publishers had different people eye-balling the stamps over the decades, there is never any ambient lighting defined, and there most certainly is no agreement between publishers on how a color name is defined. What looks like carmine under one lighting may look like 'red' under another. What Scott calls 'red' may be called 'carmine' by SG.
Don
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Posted 02/23/2019   11:43 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add oldbeeg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Boxcar,
Taking a fast look, the blue green shades, violets, purples, lemon, citron, and olive green I'd say have the biggest variations. But as each person sees colors differently -- when I worked for one company, I took a 'color test' and found I don't quite see yellows as well as reds, greens and blues -- it really is all subjective.

Don,
This was never meant to work very old stamps with color variations, but just to have a starting place to compare two or more colors. The fact that many stamps acquired are used, I see nothing wrong with having them all lumped together. Most of this collection is used, so there was no reason to separate out the mint. If I were specializing, then a specific color chart with appropriate stamps being included would certainly be in order.

B.G.
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Posted 02/23/2019   11:47 am  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi B.G.,
Sorry I misunderstood, building a topical 'color' collection can be fun and rewarding (with no 'right' way). I mistakenly thought it to be a start on the color reference collection meant to be used to ID stamp color shades.
Don
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Posted 02/23/2019   6:09 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mootermutt987 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I started doing the same thing at about the same time, 40-ish years ago. I did it only for stamp color. I found that the 'red' for one issue wasn't necessarily the same 'red' for another issue. I found variation from issue to issue. Trying to determine a particular shade of the 3c 1851 by comparing it to another issue with the 'same' color (as defined by Scott), but fewer shades, just didn't pan out for me. I abandoned the project altogether. Conceptually, it is a great idea. It sounds like you have had a better experience than I did.

I have bought some 'balance' lots over the years, and in a few I have found small collections of shades put together as reference collections by dealers. These were old-time collections - they looked like they were made sometime in the 20's to the 50's or 60's. There would be 8 or 10 'red' stamps mounted to a dealer's sheet of paper, with the shade of each stamp printed under it.

It is a good way to educate oneself. One thing I (think) I have learned is that even though trying to correspond colors between issues may not work very well, once one sees enough shades of a particular issue, one can be good at knowing what one is seeing. Experience is great! For example, it takes a while of looking at a kazillion stamps to know when one is looking at a true 'pink' (or 'pigeon blood pink') 3c 1861. The 'pink' of the 3c 1861 is not the same as the 'pink' of later issues.
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Edited by mootermutt987 - 02/23/2019 6:11 pm
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Posted 03/02/2019   11:15 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add EMaxim to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Recently I'd begun to assemble a color reference collection along the same lines as Oldbeeg. So far it's proved very useful. By comparison, commercially available color charts weren't much help at all. They differ a lot from one another and often even more so from a stamp that's supposed to be a given color. For stamp ID, I do agree that the best reference would be a mint stamp from the same country and series. Otherwise, mint from the same country and time period. But I seldom have that. Most of the time I'm forced to use a stamp in at least good condition, issued during the right period of time, irrespective of country. It still usually helps. I also second Don's comment on the lack of consistency in color nomenclature. And then there's the fact that shades of a single color often differ more from one another than what the catalogues call two quite different colors. Frustrating.
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