Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Makeshift Vending Machine Booklets

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 5 / Views: 761Next Topic  
Valued Member
United States
87 Posts
Posted 04/16/2019   7:43 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add StampOCD to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Could someone shed some light on "makeshift" booklets ?
Are they sheet stamps that are placed into a booklet?
Do they have straight edges ?
When removed from the booklet are they distinguishable from sheet stamps?

Thanks
Send note to Staff

Pillar Of The Community
United States
890 Posts
Posted 04/16/2019   8:20 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
StampOCD

I had never heard of these before. Did a search and found the following online: It taught me something I didn't know.


This is a story about the United States Postal Service being the good guys while doing a good job of responding to the needs of its customers.
The Scott Specialized Catalogue of United States Stamps & Covers includes a section on Booklets: Panes & Covers and in that listing you will find a listing for MAKESHIFT VENDING MACHINE BOOKLETS. While the editors of the Scott Catalog initially refused to include these "jury rigged" booklets, the booklets are now included with major Scott Catalog Numbers.

Beginning in 1995, the USPS contracted with MDI, a nonprofit social service organization based in Minnesota, to fabricate vending booklets to meet an early public demand. The stamp stock for these vending size booklets were taken from sheets and panes of both water-activated and self-adhesive definitive and commemorative stamps. The stamps were mounted between white card stock covers printed in blue, and thus the origin of these booklets became known as the "blues."
The first booklets that were produced – Scott Numbers BK178A-BK178F – included the #2492 pink rose. Produced as booklets of 20 in a fold-it-yourself format, the panes were modified to panes of 15-label, 14 and 16 to accommodate the vending booklet format.
Later productions of the "blues" by MDI include The Georgia O'Keefe issue, James Dean, Rural Free Delivery, Endangered Species, Indian Dances and other popular issues of the 1990s. The final additions to the series are #BK277 and #BK278 using the American Glass and Famous Trains panes for stock.
The "blue" covers are the unique characteristic of the series. There are two different outside front covers. Type I was only used on the early 32˘ Pink Rose booklets [BK178A, 178B, and combo 178E]. Some of these booklets were wrapped in cellophane rather than being taped shut. The Type I cover can be distinguished by a much narrower white band and the viewing portal is a bit lower.
On the backside of the covers there are four varieties. The booklets with the Type I front cover have no writing in the white section of the outside back cover; instead, a label listing product information was attached to the outside of the cellophane wrapper.
Subsequent booklets produced with the Type II front covers have one of three different outside back covers, Types II, II-a, and III. The only distinguishing feature between Type II and Type II-a is "Item No." and "Item #." Type III is distinguished by a UPC bar code, a different location of the circular "10% Post-Consumer Waste" label, and a different ordering of the product information.
Where did these unique booklets come from? This is the good part, the part about the Post Office doing well.
The Michigan Dyslexia Institute, Inc. (MDI) was established as a nonprofit educational organization in October 1982 to serve the more than one-half million children and adults with dyslexia in the state. In a very short span of time, MDI emerged as a unique resource and significant educational force in Michigan and in the country.
Today, most of MDIs business comes from the U.S. Postal Service which has been utilizing the HDPE laminated corrugated plastic totes to transport mail for more than a dozen years. These are the plastic open-top carrier boxes that we all use when we have large amounts of mail to take to and from the Post Office.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1189 Posts
Posted 04/16/2019   8:24 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Stampman2002 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
There are many sheet issued stamps which were used to create the makeshift booklets. These used regular sheets of stamps and once removed from the makeshift booklet are unidentifiable as such.

Here's a few examples from my collection:





















You can find these listed in the booklets section of the Scott U.S. Specialized catalog.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
87 Posts
Posted 04/16/2019   8:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampOCD to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks guys , great info.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
2721 Posts
Posted 04/16/2019   9:17 pm  Show Profile Check eyeonwall's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add eyeonwall to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
There are many sheet issued stamps which were used to create the makeshift booklets. These used regular sheets of stamps and once removed from the makeshift booklet are unidentifiable as such.

Here's a few examples from my collection:


The first 3 you pictured were not made from sheet stamp stock, they were made from booklet pane stock that was cut differently than used for normal booklet panes, and as such the MDI panes can be identified as coming from a makeshift booklet.


Quote:
Michigan Dyslexia Institute, Inc. (MDI)


Nope, MDI stands for Minnesota Diversified Industries.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
890 Posts
Posted 04/16/2019   11:39 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gettinold to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
eyeonwall

You're right. Checked their website and it seems the author of the article was in error on that point. Michigan Dyslexia Institute has nothing to do with the stamps or the mail containers. From the website of Minnesota Diversified Industries:

1970's - Developing Concepts
In 1973, manufacturing contracts with the United States Post Office and 3M begin and remain in place today. Over the next decades these and other business opportunities create hundreds of jobs for people with disabilities. Projects use a mixed work force of craftsmen and people with disabilities. In 1976, The Occupational Training Center becomes Minnesota Diversified Industries (MDI).
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by gettinold - 04/16/2019 11:42 pm
  Previous TopicReplies: 5 / Views: 761Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2021 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.13 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05