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WW1 Morale & Propaganda

 
 
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Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 07/06/2019   9:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add ikeyPikey to your friends list Get a Link to this Message


I picked-up a few WW1 Morale & Propaganda post cards at NAPEX.

Let's start (above) with the guys who wanted the war.

That caption reads: The European Balance (of power).



The publisher was Max Munk (active 1900-1917) of Vienna, Austria:


Quote:
An important publisher of artist signed cards that covered a whole range of topics and styles. Their holiday cards and images of women are the best known. Their cards, manufactured in Austria, were originally printed in chromolithography that they later replaced with the tricolor process. These cards are usually just labeled M.M. Vienne. They also puplished a few stray postcards for the Detroit Publishing Company.

http://www.metropostcard.com/publishersm2.html




The artist was the accomplished Theodor Zasche (1862-1922), also of Vienna.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/...:Theo_Zasche

Another patriotic work was this poster for the 19170531 Kreigsanleihe Tag der Osterreichischen Bohnen (War Bond Day of the Austrian (Stages)) bearing the motto Wir alle Zeichnen Kreigsanleihe! (We all draw war bonds!) (translations stolen):



Another patriotic honored the 7th War Loan:



And yet another, bearing the lovely motto Durch Sieg Zum Frieden (Peace Thru Victory), honored Union Bank and the 8th War Loan:


Quote:
This poster, published in Vienna in 1918, is an advertisement for the eighth war loan being raised by Austria-Hungary, Germany's chief ally in the war. It shows a young woman offering a bowl of coins at an altar decorated with the Austrian coat of arms.




Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
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Posted 07/08/2019   09:37 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stampfan9 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
So very nice.
Robert
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Robert
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Posted 07/08/2019   2:01 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Nice additions to your collection, ikey, I really like the tug-o-war one, great artwork. Thanks for sharing these with the club.

Linus
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Edited by Linus - 07/08/2019 2:02 pm
Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 07/08/2019   10:22 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply


(Just to be clear, y'all, the only postcard in the OP is the tug-of-war; the posters are, well, posters.)

The caption L'ENTENTE CORDIALE 1915 (above) refers to "The Allies":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triple_Entente

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allie..._World_War_I

The "CORDIALE" is a sarcastic dig, alleging that the scheming Brits are dragging Europe into war.

I quickly guessed that the arachnid in the illustration is a tarantula but, heeding The Little Voice Inside, I googled, and tarantulas do not spin webs.

Q/ So is that a tarantula subjected to artistic license, or some other arachnid?

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey


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Posted 07/09/2019   01:22 am  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The Germans had already dragged Europe into war, mon brave. I think the spider refers to the spreading legs of the Empire.
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Posted 07/20/2019   8:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
'
Geoff: I do not think the question is who really started the war but, rather, what the Germans would have been telling the Germans about who started the war.

"The scheming Brits had no business guaranteeing Belgium's neutrality" would have been one argument ... even though Prussia was also a signatory to that 1831 treaty.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
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