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Good Evening. What Scott # Is This Washington?

 
 
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Valued Member
United States
181 Posts
Posted 08/14/2019   02:01 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add NanoPhilatelic to your friends list Get a Link to this Message



Any help would be much appreciated.
Thank you.
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Valued Member
United States
181 Posts
Posted 08/14/2019   02:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NanoPhilatelic to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I think this is a #491. It has perf. 10
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Valued Member
United States
208 Posts
Posted 08/14/2019   02:59 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Philazilla to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It is an imperf 409 or 482 [depending on watermark] with fraudulent perforations. It is not a 491.
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Valued Member
United States
181 Posts
Posted 08/14/2019   03:04 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NanoPhilatelic to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Both of the perfs on each side look different.
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Valued Member
United States
208 Posts
Posted 08/14/2019   03:10 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Philazilla to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The perforations are perfect circles with no pressure ridges, and they are scissor- or blade-cut - the fraudster didn't even try to make the perf tips look right. Someone took a $1 stamp and did a bad job trying to make it look like a $12,500 stamp. This is a particularly bad fake. It is a damaged stamp. It is still good for postage though.
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Edited by Philazilla - 08/14/2019 03:12 am
Pillar Of The Community
Germany
1251 Posts
Posted 08/14/2019   03:36 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stamperix to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
If that's a weak line in the right ribbon, it'a type III stamp which only comes with rotary stamps. Then it would have to be genuine perforation holes, so someone just cut by scissor.
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United States
249 Posts
Posted 08/14/2019   06:04 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add m and m to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
it is very bad fake perf job. a scan of the back should clear the air re flat or rotary.
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United States
1224 Posts
Posted 08/14/2019   08:34 am  Show Profile Check cfrphoto's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add cfrphoto to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The stamp is a common type III horizontal rotary press coil, either an unwatermarked Scott 492 or a watermarked Scott 455. Watermarks on this stamp may be difficult to spot in fluid. The perforations were sliced by an affixing or vending machine.

Coils were developed to enable businesses to efficiently attach stamps to marketing mail. Consumer use started with early postage vending machines.
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Edited by cfrphoto - 08/14/2019 08:35 am
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Posted 08/14/2019   8:24 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I agree fully with cfrphoto. He is spot-on as usual.

There is nothing altered about your stamp. It is a perfectly legitimate Type III coil. The watermark will tell you which exact stamp you have. It went through one of the mechanical affixing machines of its day. One of the most common affixers was made by the Multipost Company of Rochester, NY.

Here is a picture of two similar affixers, the left is labeled "Made by Multipost Co. Rochester, N.Y." and the right one is labeled "Commercial Controls Corporation of Rochester, N.Y." but really the same item. The small button on the front is the screw-on cap for the water reservoir. Pushing the plunger down moistens, cuts and affixes a coil stamp.



Different views:



Patent listing on the back side of the Multipost affixer:



Business reply mail card c1930s:



2 covers mailed by Multipost with their affixed stamps:



Close-up of the 2 stamps from the covers above. Note the perforations are knife-cut and at the same slight angle at both left and right. Depending on the adjustment, stamps with 3 straight edges and one fully perforated side can be found.



Your original stamp is cut more straight than the Multipost examples, but still shows a slight slant evident in the red at the end of the perf tips at the lower right. It may have been affixed by a different brand of affixer, who knows, but the concept is still the same. Absent a cancel, yours was likely soaked from an unused prepaid reply envelope in hopes of later personal use.

Multipost also made more complicated mailing systems including privately applied cancels, too distant a tangent for this thread.

The Multipost technologies were largely replaced by meters. Some collectors consider the shortened knife-cut perforations to be damage while others consider it evidence of the evolution of mailing technology.
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United States
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Posted 08/14/2019   8:55 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stallzer to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Talk about painting a picture. What an informative post John, thank you.
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Valued Member
United States
208 Posts
Posted 08/16/2019   03:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Philazilla to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Awesome info John! Thanks!
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