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Sydney Nsw Registration Label With Violet Handstamped 'f'

 
 
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Australia
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Posted 08/14/2019   04:07 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Plateflaw to your friends list Get a Link to this Message



The registration label on this piece has a handstamped violet 'F' on it.

Not a biggie, just wondering what it signifies.

Thanks folks.
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Posted 08/14/2019   07:05 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Never seen anything like it in 15 years.
Guess:
Nothing to do with the Registration, perhaps something added by owner or clerk regarding the Package, albeit, not seen any Australian auxilliary markings with just an "F"

Can you read the CDS? ...."Registration......???? on lower ring.
Wild Guess..perhaps something to with the Sydney Departmental area when the item was registered, say..."section F" or similar.
The counters were huge in the GPO.

I've seen thousands of Registration Labels,
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Edited by rod222 - 08/14/2019 07:10 am
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Posted 08/14/2019   07:41 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Further thoughts.
Given that Registration labels in booklets could exist identically (the imprint numbers the same) Perhaps in a large GPO booklets were over stamped with violet letters to prevent a mix up in duplication?
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Australia
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Posted 08/14/2019   08:03 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Plateflaw to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Rod.

I think the CDS is the ordinary unremarkable REGISTERED - SYDNEY NSW with an illegible date.

First time I have encountered this.

I can't think of what it might signify. Probably not 'F' for 'FOREIGN', as this piece came from an accumulation of parcel pieces originating from a rural hospital in Tasmania.
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Australia
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Posted 08/14/2019   08:27 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Plateflaw to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Just looking at your labels Rod, and a number have index letters A or B...

Could this simply be a substitute for index letter F labels that may have run out?
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Posted 08/14/2019   2:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Plateflaw -

Hong Kong used to overprint one index letter over another on their registration labels, see scans below. According to Tsang, on page 7, "All overprinted registration labels are rare." Plateflaw, yours is the first one I have seen from Australia, and it sure looks like an index letter overprint to me, but I cannot confirm it. Thanks for sharing it with us.

Linus






Source: "Hong Kong Registration Labels" by Ming W. Tsang ISBN 1-890235-00-8
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Posted 08/14/2019   7:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Plateflaw to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Many thanks Linus.

I think we may be getting closer to an answer!
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Posted 08/14/2019   7:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Isn't it fabulous when minds from across the globe, contribute to knowledge?
This is the real, honest benefit of the internet.

Looks like we are on to something.
I have excerpts from Australian Registration notes,
I'll have a read through and respond.
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Posted 08/14/2019   8:01 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
There are hints here to tease us, but no direct reference to Violet Overprints...........

Source:
http://www.philatelicdatabase.com/t...labels-1952/


The following article was first published in Australian Stamp Monthly (December, 1952) and written by Alec A Gavin.

THE little Registered Label (R6 in P.O. phraseology) plays a very important part in a vital post office activity, and the collection and study of these items of Commonwealth postal stationery has attracted the attention of a number of ardent enthusiasts over the past twenty odd years.

At a cursory glance these labels bear a marked similarity to one another and would seem to have little interest to collectors except, perhaps, as a record of post office names. However, they have their own errors, provisionals, controls, double prints, and other varieties, just like the adhesive stamps; and these label varieties are, in most cases, much rarer than those of the stamps.

The use of the adhesive registration label dates, in the Commonwealth, from 1910, one of the earliest known dated covers being September 12, 1910, from the N.S.W. town of Lithgow, and it would seem that all States began to use them at about this time. A reference in the Queensland Monthly Circular (P.O.) of February, 1911, orders postmasters to "note that registered gummed labels must be affixed to all registered articles received," and a further reference in the April, 1911, Circular calls for the return of the REGISTERED marker. This was, in Queensland, a two lined mark, top line REGISTERED, lower line P.O. name. This would indicate that labels were in use before 1911 and that proper use was not being made of them by Queensland postmasters.

From Rod's collection


It must be remembered that this was prior to the issue of the first Commonwealth stamps in 1913, and each State still had charge, more or less, of its own Postal affairs. This included power to determine what size, color, and style of registration label would be used, a state of affairs which lasted until 1924, when registered label issues were generalised and there appeared the first type to be found used in all States. This, then, divides the era of R labels into two periods "pre 1924" or State period, and "post 1924" or Commonwealth period.

New South Wales, South Australia and Western Australia began with labels printed in red varying shades, the former in the normal size of today and both the others with much larger sized labels. Queensland and Victoria used black labels, while Tasmania preferred blue. So things continued for several years, each State providing a varying number of issues, but the first signs of uniformity came when all states adopted the red label and added the small insignia R6 to their then current types of labels.

The type selected for a general Commonwealth issue was the one in use by New South Wales and Queensland but with a standard printing of the P.O. name above the State name. This differed and is easily distinguished from the styles used by New South Wales and Queensland. These first Commonwealth labels were in red, and were quickly followed by a distinctive Commonwealth type, also in red. The two styles were in use concurrently until 1928, when the color was altered to blue and black. In 1934 the black was dropped, leaving all blue, and this still remains the color in use today.

The study and classification of registration labels was commenced in 1924 by Harold Charles, well known to readers of "A.S.M.," and later by others; and the formation of the Philatelic Stationery Society of Australia in 1933 gave an impetus to this study. The Society, in 1940, authorised its R. Label Committee to proceed with the classification of the Registration Labels of Australia in a systematic form, which work was completed and published in the form of a Handbook in August, 1945.

The system used by this Committee followed on similar lines to that adopted by the Army, in that the initial letter of each State prefixed its type number in State types, e.g., N1 was the first type of New South Wales, T1, the first of Tasmania, and so on; following this system then Commonwealth types received the prefix letter C and so become C1, C2, etc.

The cardinal point in classification, however, may best be described as the "Rule of R." This means that if the large R differed from its fellows it received a major listing and became a TYPE, e.g., S1; however, a label having a similar R to that of Type S1, but differing in other respects such as "NO", R6, framelines or even in the layout of the label itself received a minor listing and so was a SUBTYPE and was grouped, e.g., Sla.

Here again the Committee was posed a problem in the sorting out of State types from Commonwealth for, despite the fact that these labels were generalised in 1924, this plan has had variations at odd times and it would seem that P.O. Departments in each State still have some power to act when an emergency arises. Thus we find that in Queensland during the years of World War II, there were issued several types of R labels peculiar to that State alone. The same thing occurred in South Australia. Later on still we have the case of the label used at ANPEX and nowhere else.

So in the classification it was ruled that if a new type of label, i.e., a new type of R, were produced and used only in the one State, that particular label would become a State type, its listing indicating use in one State only, even though 1924 is the original break between the State and Commonwealth issues.

Another fact to be remembered is that like our stamps, no registered labels have been invalidated, and this accounts for the fact that even today types of labels may still be used which have long since vanished from general issue.

Even the earliest State types are reported occasionally, despite the fact that most of them are red, while current stocks are in blue. Apparently a registered label is a registered label "for a' that" and may be used up at any old time a postmaster thinks fitting.

All this, of course, merely adds spice and zest to the chase after these little items which cannot be bought unused, and a real rarity may come along at any time. Besides those already mentioned above there is a variety of type C4 in red on colored paper with numerals usually inserted by hand. There are inverted names, overprints and freaks of perforation and many rare types, the use of which may have been restricted to one office alone. In some cases only one label is known of its particular kind; nothing could be rarer than that, not even that famous old battered veteran, the 1c magenta British Guiana. For those who like plating, it is possible to reconstruct sheets of labels and the first three known Commonwealth types all appear together on one sheet along with a couple of sub-types.

Latest development in Australia is the issue of registration labels in rolls for use in machines. These coil labels are restricted in issue to the largest P.O.'s, and have been used in all States since their introduction in 1949; freely in New South Wales and Victoria, but less so in the other four States.

I will conclude this rather general article with a brief listing of the main types of R labels it is possible to collect and the reader will be able to gain an idea of the scope available to the collector of these little R stickers:-

Commonwealth. 9 Types of R. Colors: Red, Red and Black, Blue and Black, Blue, Red on colored paper.

Victoria. Two Types of R. Colors: Black, Red.

New South Wales. 9 Types of R. Colors: Red. Red with Black numerals.

Queensland. 10 Types of R. Colors: Black, Red, Red with Black Numerals, Blue, Blue on colored papers.

Tasmania. 7 Types of R. Colors: Blue with Black or Red numerals, Red, Red with Black numerals.

South Australia. 5 Types of R. Colors: Red. Blue, Blue with Black numerals.

West Australia.- 12 Types of R. Colors: Red, Red with Black or Blue numerals.

In West Australia, also, there were special labels for use on registered parcels from Perth G.P.O., and there are five types of these known; all are in red with black numerals.

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Edited by rod222 - 08/14/2019 8:09 pm
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Posted 08/15/2019   12:47 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Plateflaw, my pleasure. Additional info...The first example from Hong Kong was only in use March, April and May 1947, and the second example was only used in October, and November 1947. Both of these were very small windows of time they were used, thus the rarity factor.

I cannot make out the date on your Sydney, NSW piece. I was curious as to when your piece was cancelled. Under magnification, or other techniques, can you make out the date?

If your Sydney registration label has what is truly an index F overprint, it was also probably used a short period of time and is also rare. You may have difficulty finding another one like it, on-cover, to verify yours, but you never know.

Enjoy the hunt!
Linus


Rod...I enjoyed your article above, thanks for sharing. It IS amazing how the computer and internet bring people together to share what they have learned. I learn a lot from your posts on this forum.

Linus
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Edited by Linus - 08/15/2019 12:53 am
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Posted 08/15/2019   02:24 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Plateflaw to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Great work Rod and Linus.

The date on the CDS is difficult, but I can with some confidence suggest it is 29 NO 38. It can't be earlier than August 1938, as that was when the 1d value was issued.
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