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Looking For Scherzer Bridge Stamps

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Pillar Of The Community
Russian Federation
565 Posts
Posted 12/08/2019   2:52 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Alexey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
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Posted 12/08/2019   10:29 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add idebee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply



With the help of zooming out, I now have some idea where it is located, Thanks Alexey! I suppose this one must be the northest Scherzer bridge.
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Pillar Of The Community
United States
3915 Posts
Posted 12/09/2019   09:42 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
'
Well, idebeee, that is a matter of degrees (sorry).

https://wikimili.com/en/Skansen_Bridge ... The Skansen Bridge in Trondheim is at (only) 6325#8242;55#8243;N.

Moreover, it is counter-weighted, and rocks, but it does not roll.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey (who took the bait)
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Posted 12/09/2019   1:20 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add idebee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Well, idebeee, that is a matter of degrees (sorry).

https://wikimili.com/en/Skansen_Bridge ... The Skansen Bridge in Trondheim is at (only) 6325#8242;55#8243;N.

Moreover, it is counter-weighted, and rocks, but it does not roll.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey (who took the bait)


Thanks ikeyPikey for the infos and the link, it's great to know this Shansen bridge in Norway!

You are right, it does not roll, so it is not a Scherzer bridge. The bascule span of Strauss type moves up and down around a heel trunnion, while Scherzer rolls back and forth on a track. That is what Scherzer claims to be more efficient and easier to maintain because of less frictions.

If I am not wrong, actually they are competitors, and it seems that Strauss is the winner, and as I said I am really curious about the reasons why Scherzer loses in view that it has so many advantages to the trunnion bridges, as stated in their advertisments.
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Pillar Of The Community
United States
3915 Posts
Posted 12/09/2019   1:59 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
'
Knowing nothing about bridges, but something about business, I would guess that the rock-only designs won out over the rock'n'roll designs because they were cheaper to build ... even if they were more expensive to operate & shorter-lived.

But there might also be a question of how Scherzer chose to monetize his patent.

For example, he might have charged a very high license-only fee to encourage customers to hire him to do the construction.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey

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Posted 12/09/2019   4:29 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add michaelschreiber to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The Scherzer patent was a modification to the basic bascule bridge (a counter-weighted drawbridge).

Scherzer added a rolling-lift trunnion to the bascule bridge, which has a fixed trunnion.

Google will show you many pictures and will identify cities with bascule bridges. Then you can hunt for stamps by country.
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231 Posts
Posted 12/09/2019   8:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add idebee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The Scherzer patent was a modification to the basic bascule bridge (a counter-weighted drawbridge).

Scherzer added a rolling-lift trunnion to the bascule bridge, which has a fixed trunnion.

Google will show you many pictures and will identify cities with bascule bridges. Then you can hunt for stamps by country.


Thanks for the suggestions, michaelschreiber! I have done that to some degree. I found it's interesting that most Scherzer bridges are in America, but there is no postage stamp to commemorate them, while Asian countries have much less in number, for example, China had only 2 Scherzer bridges, but tends to put them on stamps.

We have seen them on the stamps of China and India, and I suppose other Asian countries like Burma, Laos, Vietnam, etc. probably have stamps for them if they ever have such kind of bridge built and have them survived till today. I think the reason is that these Scherzer bridges are landmarks in these countries, while not so important in the American and European countries. You know, the Tianjin's Scherzer bridge is so famouse and beloved , it even becomes the brand names of many other products.



Scherzer on Tobacco boxes
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Valued Member
231 Posts
Posted 12/09/2019   9:16 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add idebee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Knowing nothing about bridges, but something about business, I would guess that the rock-only designs won out over the rock'n'roll designs because they were cheaper to build ... even if they were more expensive to operate & shorter-lived.

But there might also be a question of how Scherzer chose to monetize his patent.

For example, he might have charged a very high license-only fee to encourage customers to hire him to do the construction.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey


Thanks ikeyPikey! You may be right, but I think all we can do is to guess from the documents survived! Some more interesting advertisments documents for technical & business references. Cheers!



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Edited by idebee - 12/09/2019 9:41 pm
Pillar Of The Community
Russian Federation
565 Posts
Posted 12/10/2019   02:44 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Alexey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
For non-rich countries, the Scherzer Bridge was a good solution. In developed countries, this design was used in industrial areas, on canals, in ports. But you are unlikely to find such a bulky and ugly design in the city center. Therefore, postage stamps show drawbridges of more elegant forms

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Pillar Of The Community
United States
3915 Posts
Posted 12/10/2019   10:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
... In developed countries, this design was used in industrial areas, on canals, in ports ...


One of the competitive advantages cited in the advertisements is speed.

The railroads were, perhaps, more willing to spend for speed - or were more likely to prioritize speed - and, of course, rail bridges were more common in the areas cited by Alexey than in, say, city centers ... particularly after The Rise of The Private Automobile.

(We were in Paris, walking on a railway-now-pedestrian bridge across the Seine, when my father z"l offered that the Nazis had probably ordered it built, for spite, just so that there should be at least one really ugly bridge in the center of Paris.)

I wonder how many taxpayers objected to walking or driving under the counterweight; I know that I "had a moment" walking under the counterweights of a vertical lift bridge on the East River (which is not a river, BTAT) (But That's Another Thread).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Categ...ew_York_City

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
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Posted 12/11/2019   12:21 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add idebee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Alexey, thanks! Great scenaries, I really enjoy watching bridges.
The one quote I love is the definition for bridge in dictionary I saw when I studied English in college.
Bridge is a pathway over an obstacle or depression. It's kinda like a pun, isnt it? Form then on , I begin to collect bridge stamps, postcards, even postmarks on this topic.

ikeyPikey, thanks! Great thoughts! Speed, durablity, simple maitainace, efficiency#65292;all these#65292; I think after all , it's a problem of money. If you have more fund, you can looks to satisfy your aesthetic needs, but for the poor countries in the beginning of the 20th century, what they needed is to spend less money and do more things.

Actually , I have seen a proposal plan of "An Artistic Scherzer Rolling Lift Bridge", which you will not see the counter weight part. It looks to me a little like the London Tower Bridge. I don't know whether it won the bid or not and built at last, but I think perhaps not. Here is the picture for your reference, it's very interesting to see!

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Edited by idebee - 12/11/2019 12:28 am
Pillar Of The Community
United States
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Posted 12/11/2019   12:31 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ikeyPikey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
'
Based on the vertical lift bridges I've seen, both by IRL & URL, I am guessing that they hid the counterweights in the towers, and that there were pulleys here & there to get the job done.

Cheers,

/s/ ikeyPikey
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Pillar Of The Community
Russian Federation
565 Posts
Posted 12/11/2019   03:36 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Alexey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
as usual, lifting mechanisms are hidden in the massive coastal abutments of the bridge
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Posted 12/17/2019   10:21 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add idebee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Great to find that there was a PP released in 2015 and with a pictorial postmark as well.

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Pillar Of The Community
United States
5774 Posts
Posted 12/17/2019   11:33 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Cjd to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You would have no trouble finding postcards depicting this
http://landmarkhunter.com/169400-st...-bay-bridge/
bridge, but I'm sure it hasn't appeared on a stamp.

It is located in a high-traffic tourist area, so millions of people are familiar with it, but it just isn't 'sexy' enough for a stamp in the U.S.

(It's on the Great Lakes, in the City of Sturgeon Bay, State of Wisconsin. Door County is a famous summer vacation area for people from Chicago, St. Louis, Minneapolis and Milwaukee.)
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