Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Help! Need Help With A New Term

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Valued Member
United States
81 Posts
Posted 12/12/2019   9:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add hawkstamp to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I am looking for help with a term that I am not familiar with at all. I received stamp booklets (Scott BK 157 as an example) that show in their description the line "ohne Nutlinie". Others say "mit Nutlinie", possibly a German term. I have been searching the internet, but no success. Now I am hoping that somebody can help me with this term.
Thank you very much in advance.
Pete
Send note to Staff

Pillar Of The Community
United States
6266 Posts
Posted 12/12/2019   9:46 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add revcollector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Google translate says it's "without groove line" in German. Not quite sure what that means, unless it refers to a guideline.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Bedrock Of The Community
Learn More...
Australia
28125 Posts
Posted 12/12/2019   11:17 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Further......
Could "groove lines" mean "creasing" perhaps ?

Scott No. 2CVP15-22 Var. PictureItPostage Stamp Set No. 1
of all 4 value levels 23 to 60 horizontal and vertical
without groove lines on the back of the carrier film.
http://www.usstamps.de/cvp/picturei...20051101.htm
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by rod222 - 12/12/2019 11:25 pm
Pillar Of The Community
United States
6266 Posts
Posted 12/13/2019   01:24 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add revcollector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Creasing is a real possibility, since there are booklet panes that are known both folded (creased) and unfolded.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Netherlands
567 Posts
Posted 12/13/2019   03:27 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Johan Buvelot to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
To the best of knowledge it means folding line.

Part of the paper(in this case booklet) that can easily be bent.

In this case to be able to also close the booklet.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Germany
1348 Posts
Posted 12/13/2019   03:57 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stamperix to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, it is a "line" where the material is a bit thinner (or pressed) so that it can be folded.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
81 Posts
Posted 12/13/2019   2:12 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hawkstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you all very much for the interesting replies.
In my opinion the replies are all very much alike, which made it easy to look for the "nut line". What I have noticed is that all booklets WITHOUT the nut line include the number of stamps on one pane that make up the length of the cover. Therefore, a booklet WITHOUT the nut line is one where the pane is not folded over. On booklets WITH the nut line, I found that they all contained one or more panes that were longer than the length of the cover, hence had to be folded over. It seems than that the nut line is the line where the pane is folded over. If there are still other explanations I'm interested in hearing about it.
Again, thanks very much.
Pete
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
  Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2020 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.2 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05