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A C Roessler, The Good The Bad And The Ugly

 
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Posted 01/30/2020   1:22 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add zepman to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Borrowed verbatim from MDS/MDS5866

"Albert C. Roessler (1883-1952) was a stamp dealer who was best known for his cacheted covers, and examples of his work are sought by collectors.

Roessler was born April 7, 1883, in Newark, N.J., and spent a portion of his early years in Colorado. He was a founding member of the Denver Stamp Club, established December 13, 1905.

Within a few years he was established as a stamp dealer in east Orange, N.J., after a period of Nassau Street (New York) activity.

With the coming of air mail in the US in 1918, Roessler began the creation of cacheted covers. His first cover, according to Barry Newton (A. C. Roessler: Photo Cachet Catalogue, FDC publishing co., 1976), was for the first air mail flight between Washington, New York, and Philadelphia. He published Air Mail Stamp News from 1918 to 1938.

Something of a mystery man, Roessler would never permit his photograph to be published and no confirmed pictures of him are known. Dan Barber in his "Via Air Mail" column in Stamp Collector (September 13, 1980), reproduces two photographs which might be those of Roessler.

Roessler is reported to have gone out of the stamp business in 1940, and he died on January 26, 1952."

Roessler is known for his unique border graphics, original artwork, and rubber stamped cachets used for both FDC and first flight covers.




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Posted 01/30/2020   2:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the biography. I certainly know of him, but until now, I didn't know anything about him personally.

There are sure a lot of covers associated with him. They are kind of hard to miss, actually.

One has to wonder what his motives were for avoiding cameras.
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Posted 01/30/2020   4:31 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add RK1468 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I suspect Roessler's story is colorful and well-documented elsewhere. However, here is a bit more from the Canadian Aerophilatest (2001; p. 11). It appears Mr. Roessler was charged and convicted of mail fraud related to faking oversubscribed polar submarine covers in 1931.

Edited to add some prior discussions:
http://goscf.com/t/63111
http://goscf.com/t/50748
http://goscf.com/t/34252&whichpage=1#290426
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Edited by RK1468 - 01/30/2020 4:37 pm
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Posted 02/02/2020   2:23 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Kimo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, there was also some very bad things that Roessler did: the following is taken from a publication of the numismatic society:

"On Jan 1, 1933, Roessler was indicted and arrested on two federal charges of crimes committed five-six years earlier: (1) using the U.S.mails for deceptive purposes in 1927; and (2) printing and using printed items "in similitude of obligations of the United States" in 1928.The first charge was that, while processing event covers for a failed Arctic exploration flight on 9/24/27 by Sir Hubert Wilkins, Roessler faked a facsimile of a New York cancellation to create additional covers after the trip when demand for the covers exceeded the supply actually taken aboard the airplane.

The second charge was that Roessler overprinted "GRAF ZEPPELIN" on a 1c Franklin, and then advertised it for sale at 10c each (Newton,1977, p. 95) and used it 10/28/28 in combination with other stamps when servicing Graf Zeppelin LZ-127 Flight Covers (See ROE-FZ15, Newton,1977, p. 95). The overprinting was identical to the font style as the Post Office Dept had used on a 2c Washington stamp for the #646 2cMolly Pitcher and #647/648 2c and 5c Hawaii Issues, which Roessler had previously mocked publicly.

On June 21, 1933 Roessler pled guilty to both charges in Federal Court in Newark. He was sentenced to two years in the Atlanta penitentiary, but the sentence was suspended and he was placed on probation for three years. (Linn's Stamp Review, July 15, 1933,quoted in Newton, 1977, p. 106)."


While these are the two charges on which he was indicted and convicted, there was quite a bit of suspicion at the time that this was not all he was guilty of. The suspicion was that he was not shy about re-creating (forging is the straight-forward term) first flight covers when he ran out of real ones to sell to his clients, and so he made more after the fact to sell.

Because of his proven and suspected criminal activity in making first flight covers back then, it is hard to authenticate his covers as being actually flown since they have the age to them. As such there are many first flight cover collectors who will not buy a Roesler cover since they do not know if it is real. On the other hand there are a few collectors who do seek out his covers since he is notorious and a convicted forger. The reason why he did this may have been simply to make money, though another reason was his well known and very vocal hate of the Federal government and the Post Office. Or it might be a bit of both.

He used several aliases in his philatelic business and when you see a cover addressed to any ot the following names, you will be able to identify it as one that he himself made. These are the aliases that he used that I know of, though there could be others:

Albert C. Roessler
A.C. Roessler
A.C. Rowe
Roberta Rowe
G. Nelson Lyons

He was a complicated person, to be polite.
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Posted 02/04/2020   09:44 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add zepman to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I guess I give him credit for his innovations and put the fraud in the background. There is a market for fakes as well if you can figure them out. The Graf Zeppelin overprint is much more valuable than the cover without it. He also goes by AC Roe which I didn't see above. As far as his first flight covers researching the postmarks would be an aid.
Some more of his cachets below




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Posted 02/08/2020   8:49 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stampcrow to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I guess he couldn't find a buyer for this one?!

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Posted 02/13/2020   09:00 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add zepman to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Roessler designed several envelope borders some unique and others standard and copied by other designers. The horizontal and barber pole designs can usually be attributed when used by him.




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Posted 02/19/2020   7:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Hounddog Bill to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It seems he ventured into Canadian covers also.

Cheers, Bill




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Posted 02/27/2020   09:40 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add zepman to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Roessler had a print shop and he marketed his border patterns far and wide.
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Posted 08/05/2020   10:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add zepman to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Roessler was active in early first flights and used his business envelopes as cachets.


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Posted 08/05/2020   10:29 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add zepman to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Some more examples of his stationary.



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