Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

#9 - Help Understanding Mobile, AL Cancels

Previous Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 20 / Views: 798Next Topic
Page: of 2
New Member
United States
3 Posts
Posted 04/07/2020   04:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Piratebones to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
A friend of mine who posts on this site saw your question about Mobile cancels and passed it on to me. He suggested I join and reply, so here I am. I've been collecting Mobile for a long time and have catalogued over 350 dated examples before 1860, over 200 of which I own. The largest percentage are stampless.

You have received some great replies already so I don't know what I can add at this point, but I'll try.

A brief History of the Mobile CDS
There are at least 11 different Mobile CDS before 1860. The first were used during the late territorial period and into the early statehood period, about 1827, and were black. After that, red and blue began to also be used. It is believed that blue designated unpaid and red designated prepaid postage. As noted by others here, Mobile apparently did not like to have to apply the bar grid cancel to a stamped letter. They reverted back to using their CDS as town cancel and killer about the time the 1851 series of stamps came out.
They also stopped using blue ink and began using black ink for their CDS on domestic mail, with red being used occasionally for stampless and for most foreign mail. The latest use of red on domestic mail I have seen is 9/27/1852, on a stampless. After that, all Mobile cancels I've seen are black for domestic (and some foreign mail) and red for foreign mail.

The predominant Mobile CDS used on stamps between 1851 and 1858 are:

Prior to 1854;31mm;Ala.below


1854-1858;31mm;ALA.(small LA)below;12/16/1855


1856-1857;31mm;ALA.(small LA) after Mobile;12/28/1856


1850-1853, A very similar cancel;33mm; Ala. after Mobile and with a rate numeral below the date
11/6/1853


From the photos in your post, I'd say the first and third ones are foreign usages but without seeing a rate number or the "Ala." "ALA.", what year range is guess work. But, because the letters of MOBILE are relatively close together, they look to me like the smaller 1856-1857 cancels.

I hope this adds some information for you. Mobile is great topic, lots of color and variety in the cancels and lots of good stories.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Moderator
Learn More...
8055 Posts
Posted 04/07/2020   04:49 am  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Welcome and thank you for your input.
Don
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
New Member
United States
3 Posts
Posted 04/07/2020   06:03 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Piratebones to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Txstamp

Mobile was dealing with a large volume of mail because of all the mail being sent there dailey by steamer from New Orleans. They had a designated wharf dock for the New Orleans mail boat.

Mail to and from New Orleans via the great eastern mail route was somewhat unreliable. The New Orleans newspaper, The Daily Picayune regularly had editorials about this. As a result, many in New Orleans put their mail for the eastern cities on the steamer to Mobile because it was believed that it get into the great eastern mail route sooner and was more reliable.

Frequently the Mobile post office would only have 15 to 30 minutes to process the New Orleans way mail before the mandated time to close the mails. In March of 1852 Mobile Postmaster Beers sent New Orleans Postmaster Musson a letter telling him that with the new mail closing schedule he would only have 15 minutes to process the 300 to 400 pieces, and increasing, of New Orlean mail arriving by steamer each day and that unless the boats are early, the mail will have to be held over till the next day.

A respectable percentage of the Mobile cancelled mail I have and have seen was actually written in New Orleans.

The additional 1 cent postage for the way mail is probably also why there are a lot of the 1851 series 1 cents stamps cancelled Mobile. That and the large volume of current market prices circulars mailed out.

Hopefully this is not too far off topic.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by Piratebones - 04/07/2020 06:10 am
Valued Member
United States
74 Posts
Posted 04/07/2020   08:32 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add widglo46 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Piratebones - Thanks so much for all of the additional information.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
2000 Posts
Posted 04/07/2020   10:36 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
piratebones - Welcome!

Your posts are very informative. Thanks a lot.

I am familiar with the terrific Chronicle article on (mistakenly prepaid) Way mail at New Orleans & Mobile, which also covered the issue of New Orleans to Mobile Way mail somewhat.

I didn't mention that fact about both of the 1847 covers that I posted, but, both are certainly Way letters at Mobile - from NO.

The 10-cent cover is marked Way, and is datelined New Orleans. It is clearly a Way letter, and was sent as you state.

The 5-cent cover has no contents, but the Dayton correspondence with this handwriting, originated in New Orleans. So I'm sure the 5c cover falls in the category of being an "un-marked" Way letter.

Your post, which adds this useful information:


Quote:
Mobile post office would only have 15 to 30 minutes to process the New Orleans way mail


Certainly explains why most Mobile Way letters from New Orleans are unmarked.

I was actually pretty thrilled to get the 10c cover which is actually marked, since that seems harder to find.
The 10c cover actually has even more going for it than immediately meets the eye, but I'll stop here for now.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous TopicReplies: 20 / Views: 798Next Topic  
Previous Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2020 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.17 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05