Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Question(S) About Scott "Big Brown" Stamp Albums

Next Page    
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 18 / Views: 1,305Next Topic
Page: of 2
Valued Member
United States
393 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   12:09 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Walkman82 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I purchased a stamp collection this week that is stored in 18 Scott "Big Brown" stamp albums of varying sizes, 15 of which have slipcovers. I haven't received the shipment yet (will be here Saturday), but they appear to be original "classic" brown 2-post binders. I do not plan to keep them as I use Lighthouse Grande albums for my collection and I want to maintain continuity. I haven't seen any listed for sale on various sites, so have no idea what they may be worth.

Are these in demand? What would be a fair price for an album and slipcover in good/great condition? The price for a worn binder?

Thanks in advance,

Scott

Send note to Staff
Member APS #174069, PNC3 #2386, AFDCS #29532O, PSS #8418

Plate Number Coil Collectors Club (www.PNC3.org)

Coil Line (club newsletter) Editor & Webmaster

Visit my website @ www.scottsstampcollection.com

Pillar Of The Community
United States
1014 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   12:48 am  Show Profile Check ray.mac's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add ray.mac to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hey Walkman--
I've been working towards trying to find a complete set of the "Browns" in decent shape. I saw one album a couple of years ago in the 2 post binders. Other than that, on eBay, I haven't seen anything but the bound versions.

So, what I'm thinking is that the versions in the loose leaf binders are less available, and for those who are collecting the albums themselves, or are using the "browns" for a better, more complete classics collection than the "Blues" or don't want to use Steiner, these might be nice options and may very well be in nice demand.

Especially Part Four, which is the hardest to find. There is one on eBay right now, but it is a bound version, missing some pages, not in the greatest of shape, and the seller wants $300+ for it. Don't think he'll get that. For anyone really looking for a Part Four, they'll want all of the pages....

I have another 1901-1920 coming in the mail tomorrow that isn't in great shape, but I bought this one for the stamps and paid I think, $125 or so including the shipping.

AND....if you find a Part Four in your lot and once you've parsed what you want out of it, please let me know when you post it somewhere or maybe there's a trade to be had...

Hope this is helpful-- Ray
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by ray.mac - 05/08/2020 12:49 am
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
United States
1361 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   01:10 am  Show Profile Check KRelyea's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add KRelyea to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
When you get them please post some pictures. I'm not sure how someone would get 18 of these. The original Browns were 4 volumes with maybe a couple supplements, I'd like to see pictures. Sometimes folks call the Scott Vintage pages Big Brown's because these new pages are modern reproductions of the original Brown pages on heavier one sided pages.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
393 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   4:24 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Walkman82 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I may be mistaken in referring to the albums as "Big Brown", I apologize for any confusion. The albums are from Scott, but are generic. The pages are not for the international album, but rather are for the specific specialized collection. I plan to sell the albums only with no pages. Photos below (from the original auction listing).

Thoughts?






Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Member APS #174069, PNC3 #2386, AFDCS #29532O, PSS #8418

Plate Number Coil Collectors Club (www.PNC3.org)

Coil Line (club newsletter) Editor & Webmaster

Visit my website @ www.scottsstampcollection.com
Valued Member
Learn More...
406 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   4:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StateRevs to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Holy smokes!

That is a buncha PNCs!!!!!!!!!!!!

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
393 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   4:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Walkman82 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
StateRevs, only about half of the albums are PNCs. The remaining half is precancels that span from the 4th Bureau (Series of 1922-1925), Prexies (1938), Liberty (1954), Prominent Americans (1964-78), and Americana (1975-1981). I haven't actually looked at them yet as they arrive tomorrow. There is definitely a whole lot of both though.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Member APS #174069, PNC3 #2386, AFDCS #29532O, PSS #8418

Plate Number Coil Collectors Club (www.PNC3.org)

Coil Line (club newsletter) Editor & Webmaster

Visit my website @ www.scottsstampcollection.com
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1116 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   5:31 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Hal to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Walkman82 --- I have only one word, a jaw-dropping: WOW!!!
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
United States
1361 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   6:23 pm  Show Profile Check KRelyea's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add KRelyea to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
What type of posts and spacing are they?
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
393 Posts
Posted 05/08/2020   6:47 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Walkman82 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
They appear to be standard Scott 2-post binders.


Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Member APS #174069, PNC3 #2386, AFDCS #29532O, PSS #8418

Plate Number Coil Collectors Club (www.PNC3.org)

Coil Line (club newsletter) Editor & Webmaster

Visit my website @ www.scottsstampcollection.com
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
United States
1361 Posts
Posted 05/09/2020   3:12 pm  Show Profile Check KRelyea's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add KRelyea to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I buy collections and break them down and sell them on eBay and as a result I have lots of empty binders. Binders sell pretty well on eBay but the challenge is shipping them. I found I can sell Scott or Minkus binders in lots of 5 and fit them into a long priority box and ship them for $17. Used Scott International Binders in very good condition sell for $15-20/binder, Minkus sell for as much as $40/binder.

Your binders have the nice dust covers but that makes shipping more difficult. You can probably ship 2 at a time in the Priority boxes for $17 or you can use 12X12X12 boxes and ship 4 or 5 using UPS Simple Rate for around $30.

Hope this helps.

Ken
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
842 Posts
Posted 05/11/2020   01:36 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add DrewM to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Your "slipcovers" are actually "slipcases" or sometimes "dustcases". Slipcovers are what people put on furniture.

Without pages, "albums" are "binders". I see this confusion all the time, and it might confuse buyers who expect pages in their "albums".

The so-called "Big Browns" were an old series of four or five brown-covered sewn-binding albums (not loose-leaf) sold by Scott early in the 20th century. Yes, starting over a hundred years ago. Each volume covered a different time period, starting with the first volume covering the 19th century, then subsequent volumes every few years from then on until almost 1940. They're the predecessor of what became the Scott Specialty albums for separate countries -- in green covered binders.

A version of these pages with spaces for fewer stamps until 1940 but nearly all stamps after that date, on smaller pages became today's Scott International album. It has blue covers.

The Big Browns disappeared around 1940 or so when Scott moved into these other albums. But some collectors still look for them in their original sewn bindings because they're unusually complete and classic -- if you can find them in good condition. But thats' not what you have.

But what you have is different. They are reproductions sold much more recently -- in brown vinyl -- of the current Scott Specialty albums. But they were not sold as Specialty albums, but to house Specialty-size reissued pages which were copies of the old "Big Brown" pages. If that makes any sense!

Scott may have briefly made and sold these binders, themselves (I think I see "Scott" on the spines). But most of these brown binders for International albums were sold by Subway Stamp Shop. That's because, with Scott's permission, Subway did their own reissue of a loose-leaf version of the earlier "Big Brown" pages. Subway brought those older pages back into print a few years ago with Scott's okay.

I think Scott may have given up on their own brown-colored binders as they did with some other fancy binders at that time, including their own short-lived brown Scott National album. The brown color was to echo their original "Big Brown" albums -- which these are kind of similar to. In their advertising, Subway called these new 2-post brown binders the "Big Brown International" -- which must confuse a lot of people. Maybe they should have added "New" to that name? They are copies of the earlier Big Brown album, so that makes sense.

With Scott's permission, the reissued pages are still sold by Subway as their "Vintage Reproduction" pages, loose-leaf copies of the Scott Big Brown pages which had spaces for nearly all stamps from the 19th century through 1940s, something even the current Scott International albums don't do. They're easy to identify because they're printed on only one side of the page, the paper is a little thicker than normal, and they say "Vintage Reproduction" in the margins. So you'll never confuse them with any other pages.

The Vintage Reproduction pages were issued in two sizes, the blue Scott International album size and the larger green Scott Specialty album size page. The larger pages fit the (green) Scott 2-post or 3-ring binders. Subway offered your binders as a fancier option for the larger size pages. So your brown binders are basically green 2-post binders made fancier with padding.
They're covered in leatherette, whatever that is. I looked through a paper Subway catalogue I have from a few years ago (now online) and it doesn't look like Subway sold these binders separately, only as sets with tye larger size of the VR pages. They can also be used for Scott Specialty pages which will fit in them just fine, but they won't fit smaller Scott International pages.

Whew!

What are they worth? Whatever people will pay for them. But a normal Scott Specialty binder sells (used) for maybe $20-30 in really good shape. With slipcases, maybe more. Since these are a bit unusual, maybe they'll sell for more. But the thing is most collectors who house their collections in Scott Specialty albums may actually prefer using matching green Scott Specialty binders. I do. Who would use these then? Maybe someone who wanted to house a particular collection differently, maybe someone with VR pages in the Scott Specialty size -- or someone who wanted to put normal Scott Specialty pages in them. The best approach would be to let the market tell you what they're worth.

Also, why some of your brown binders are taller than the others I have no idea. It's very odd. Buyers should know that or you may get returns if they don't match what they also have.




Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by DrewM - 05/11/2020 02:26 am
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
United States
521 Posts
Posted 05/11/2020   09:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wkusau to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Drew,

That was a great explanation.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
United States
1361 Posts
Posted 05/12/2020   1:55 pm  Show Profile Check KRelyea's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add KRelyea to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Great explanation Drew and it's a difficult issue to explain. There also were a few Brown Scott Binders as shown here:




https://www.ebay.com/itm/3-Volume-S...AOSwtPReE7NB

I have 5 of these in much better shape than the one above and I am keeping them on a shelf until my France collection is full enough that I won't be adding stamps too often and then I'll transfer my Specialty pages to the Brown Binders. I'll get appropriate labels and I'll have a collection in beautiful old Binders!

I could use 5 more of these old Brown binders and when I saw the original post I was hopeful but these aren't what I want.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
842 Posts
Posted 05/13/2020   7:24 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add DrewM to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It's funny how many of the old stamp collecting materials are actually more appealing than what we have today.

If you look at old photos of collectors like FDR, they used springback blank albums a lot of the time. You can still get those binders and blank pages today. The old Brown Scott albums with the sewn bindings you can't get anymore. But they still appeal to a lot of collectors for their greater comprehensiveness and their quality. Although sewn bindings prevent adding pages, they do hold the album together better. And if a publisher adds page "spacers" to allow for the thickness of the stamps, the covers won't bulge out.

Some current binders, albums, and pages are well made -- Lighthouse, Davo, Schaubeck, and others, but they're also very expensive. Davo in the Netherlands makes very good albums. But they offer only two-posts. They're also very expensive. Like Lighthouse, Schaubeck, and some others, collecting just one country in Davo albums will cost maybe $150 per volume -- and you'll need 4, 5, 6 volumes to cover one country, making the price of a single album very expensive.

Generallly, in the mid-price range (meaning "affordable by most of us"), Scott is about the only quality album available today. You can a country in a Scott album, requiring say 2-4 binders, for somewhere between $250-500, give or take. That's a lot less expensive than the others. And that album will be good looking, printed on good paper with good page layouts, and in good binders. And you can get annual supplements. You can't beat that.

I know about Mystic, H.E. Harris, and a few others. But they aren't "mid-range" to me, but no-frills albums sold at lower prices. They sell to thrifty collectors. Mystic has one very expensive U.S. album with mounts, but it's price is really high for what it provides -- in my opinion.

I don't much like three-ring binders for my stamp albums.I understand that the cost savings of these albums is important to many collectors. But in typical three-ring binder albums, the pages are too small. Album pages should be large enough to display stamps well without being crowded. There is one exception I've found --the smaller of the two Scott' three-ring binders. It's thinner than the larger three-ring binder Scott sells. I find it easy to use, and it's good looking. Also the pages are larger than the usual pinter paper page since they're Scott's regular pages. It does hold only about 100 pages, though, so you'll need a few.

I have a three-volume H.E. Harris worldwide album I bought just for fun, but its pages are so over-crowded they lack any aesthetic quality. And it's cheaply made with thin paper and a vinyl binder which is tearing as all vinyl binders eventually do.

So I'm a fan of Scott albums and pages.

Some of the older Scott albums were good ones. The earliest ones with sewn bindings are nearly all gone by now, and the survivors are likely to be pretty well trashed. They're a hundred years old in many cases. But they're still sought after. Some of the older Scott loose-leaf binders have held up pretty well. I use a few old 1940s era Scott International (blue) binders which still work fine -- along with a few dozen more recent matching binders. I use these older binders because they're a narrow 2 1/2" size Scott no longer sells. It's the perfect size for picking them up with one hand. Scott's current 3 1/2 or 3 3/4" International binders I can barely pick up with one hand when they have pages in them. These are some of the reasons I think collectors look for older binders and albums -- size, weight, quality.

A 2 1/2" thick International binder would still sell today. You'd need more of them, but they would be more practical and pleasant to use, so worth some extra expense. In fact, when Scott dropped this size binder, Subway Stamp Shop began to make an identical International binder in the same size Scott had made. And they made them better than Scott's version. Subway's version had a better cloth hinge, for one thing. I found a few on eBay years ago, and they're much easier to use than the wider Scott International binders now being sold.

Scott has abandoned many of its old binder sizes for Specialty albums, too. I'd guess Ken's brown binders are one of those abandoned sizes. Scott used to sell at least four different sizes of Specialty binders from about 1 1/2" thick up to 4 inches or more. Today their 2-post binders only come in one size -- too thick for my taste. My Swiss collection is in four of the smallest Scott 2-post binders which are no longer made. They're easy to pick up and really nice to work with. Fewer pages makes using an album easier. The pages don't curve as much, for one thing. I'm not sure why Scott doesn't sell a greater variety of binder sizes? Some of their product decisions mystify me.

I do like the improved metal hinges on Scott binders, fixing a major weakness of their binders. (Hinges on Scott binders can be repaired using good quality cloth tape. Don't use "duct tape" which will be a disaster. Use "gaffer's tape" instead.)

For me, Scott is the best and most affordable mid-range publisher of stamp albums. But I really wish they would sell more sizes of binders for both their Specialty and International albums. They could also add a "brown option" for International album users who want to house a special collection in it. I'd buy some.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by DrewM - 05/14/2020 12:15 am
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
United States
1361 Posts
Posted 05/15/2020   9:58 pm  Show Profile Check KRelyea's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add KRelyea to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Drew I agree with you, I hoard all the narrow Scott International or Specialized Binders I come across, they are very useful.

Here is my little hoard of Brown 2 post binders. Maybe I will find a bookbinder and see if he can clean them up and do custom labels.


Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
842 Posts
Posted 05/20/2020   6:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add DrewM to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Ken, that picture trips my OCD. I'd have to put them in order or it would drive me nuts, I tell 'ya.

Those are pretty neat old Scott binders. I like old, very classy albums. Much different from most modern albums -- and no vinyl!

I imagine you might get some sort of brown labels made to glue over the existing names on the spines. An older print shop might be able to come up with something that looks good. I wouldn't worry about matching the color to the binders since contrasting labels might look even better.

Even less expensively, Scott/Amos sells labels for their Specialty albums that might cover those titles. But they're in green and they're textured so they'd look a little odd, I think. They also sell non-textured maroon labels for Minkus binders. Those might work fine. And a red label would look pretty good. Not sure if you can get them with an appropriate title printed on them or blank so you can have someone print on them. Might be interesting to try one, though. That's a cheap fix that would look good. Those labels can be removed with a hair dryer - and remounted on another binder, if you need to do that.

With old binders, I'm generally inclined to leave minor problems largely untouched, just maybe snip off any loose threads. I like old things and don't need them to look brand new.

I've had good success using gaffer's tape to repair old binders fairly neatly. I mainly use it for the "hinges" where the material is starting to give way. And for the tops and bottoms of the spines. It requires careful cutting and being neat in applying it, of course, but the final product looks as good as new . . . well, sometimes. It might be available in dark brown, or a contrasting color, if you' decide to try that. In locating gaffer's tape, Amazon is your friend.

But an actual bookbinder would do the best work. They do cost a lot, though. I saw a post somewhere recently where someone had a large book or binder restored. Just one. It cost $200. Now you understand my use of gaffer's tape which helps a lot, but costs very little.

If you want to remove the old red paper labels, try a hair dryer first to soften the glue. That sometimes works. Don't overheat the binders or you might damage the covering. Second step might be to add a little moisture to soften the glue, as well, but very little as it might stain the covers. Steam might be best -- from a tea kettle maybe? Not sure. Or maybe a product like "Stamp Lift" would work? Or is that too agressive? Many commercial glue removers wouid be too aggressive, but I've had good success with "GooGone" which is more gentle and doesn't damage things or stain them like other products sometimes do. No sharp instruments for the same reason, though maybe some gentle persuasion with a pen knife. Or just a fingernail.

I wonder if Scott published annual volumes before these, starting in 1930 or so? I know they published a 19th century album, followed by a 1901-20 album, then a 1920s album, then an early 1930s album and a later 1930s album (maybe for the mid '30s). That makes five volumes before they gave up doing this in 1939 or 1940. I think that's right. These "annual albums" were intended to be updates for collectors who had the earlier International volumes. How long did they think they'd keep issuing an annual volume, I wonder? I suppose that question led some smart soul at Scott to propose loose-leaf albums and separate country albums, and so on.

My thoughts for what they're worth. Now put the "1934-35" volume first, and . . . .


Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by DrewM - 05/20/2020 6:50 pm
Page: of 2 Previous TopicReplies: 18 / Views: 1,305Next Topic  
Next Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2020 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.39 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05