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Show Your US 1851-57 Imperforate Stamps

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Author Replies: 2,162 / Views: 96,674Next Topic
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Posted 05/03/2022   11:13 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mootermutt987 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Stan! I agree about the descriptive writing on the front. The person that is going to buy such a cover (or wonder why it was priced at $30, when other #11's were probably selling for $5 or less) is going to flip it over to read any description written on the reverse. Better yet, the dealer would 'invest' in a blank label and write the description on that and stick it to the cover 'flip'. And, you probably already know, DON'T try to erase the writing from the cover - this 1850's paper loses some of its color, quite often, when an eraser is used on it. If the pencil writing were on the stamp itself, I might recommend carefully using a soft gum eraser to remove it, but NOT on one of these SFLs.

Nice examples, by the way. I particularly like the Line Through Three Cents variety. Along with the very clear doubling of the bottom label, the inner circles of the rosettes are also doubled, and this shows that the 'mis-registration' of the two images is almost exactly the diameter of the inner circle of the rosettes. I suppose the same could be inferred from the doubling at the bottom, but it may not be clear whether the shift was up or down (it might be inferred that the line at B caused by the either the top OR the bottom of the bottom label), but seeing the rosette doubling leaves no doubt at all.

Thank you for sharing those!!
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Posted 05/06/2022   7:38 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
This is an interesting little advertising cover with a cross gutter, or centerline, example of a Scott's #26. A 33mm, blue, AUG 17, (1860) "YORK SUL(PHUR) SPRINGS, Pa" CDS ties this stamp to a neat advertising cover from a (very) small town in rural Pennsylvania.

Originally named PETERSBURG, later changed to YORK SULPHUR SPRINGS, and ultimately renamed as YORK SPRINGS.

The water was regarded as medicinal but unpalatable. Analysis claimed 20 parts Epsom salts, 6 parts gypsum, 4 parts common salt, and the balance sulfur. York Sulphur Springs was the first summer resort in Adams County and was patronized by people from Philadelphia and Baltimore who came to the resort by stage coach.

General George Washington and his wife Martha visited the area in the summer of 1799.

As of the census of 2000, there were 574 people, 186 households, and 129 families residing in the borough.

YORK SULPHUR SPRINGS is considered a DPO, or Dead Post Office. The Post Office is listed as being in operation under that name from 1819-1887. From 1887 to the present day, it is YORK SPRINGS.

The "United States Post Offices Volume IV - Northeast", as compiled by Richard W. Helbock, shows Petersburg Post Office being open from 1795-1832. It also shows YORK SULPHUR SPRINGS as being open from 1819-1887 and YORK SPRINGS as being open from 1887 to present day.

The American Stampless Cover Catalog shows manuscript "PETERSBURG(H)" cancel being used in 1849. It also shows a 32mm, red, "YORK SUL SPRINGS" CDS with a possible "PAID" and or a "3".

All of this kind of helps the advertising blind stamp make more sense - and lets us know that in 1860, York Springs went by all three names! They are all on the front of this cover!

J(acob) A. GARDNER
DRY GOODS - GROCERIES
HARDWARE &
PETERSBURG
YORK SPRINGS
PA

There is a Jacob Gardner buried in the Holy Trinity Church Cemetery
216 Main St, York Springs, PA 17372. Born Aug 23, 1805, died Oct 4, 1862. 57 years. He would have been 55 at the time of this letter and was apparently in the grocery store business.

The envelope is addressed to:
"David McConaughy (July 13, 1823 January 14, 1902) David was a noted attorney, state senator, cemetery president, and civic leader in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, as well as a part-time intelligence officer for the Union Army during the American Civil War. He was a driving force behind the creation of the Gettysburg National Cemetery following the Battle of Gettysburg. He also led early efforts to preserve the Gettysburg Battlefield for future generations."

"He attended Gettysburg College from 1834 until 1838, when he transferred to Washington College, where his uncle, also named David McConaughy, a former Presbyterian minister in Gettysburg, was the president. After graduating in 1840, he accepted a position as principal of a high school in Maryland, where he remained two years."

"McConaughy then studied law under noted abolitionist Thaddeus Stevens and became an attorney in Adams County. He was active in politics as a Whig. He helped organize the Gettysburg chapter of the YMCA and often sponsored lectures to raise funds for the organization, which often used "McConaughy's Hall" as a meeting place. From 1853 until 1863, he served as president and chairman of the board of directors for the newly established Evergreen Cemetery, and oversaw the construction of its now famous brick gatehouse on Cemetery Hill. He joined the newly formed Republican Party, served as a delegate to the 1860 National Convention, and became an outspoken supporter of President Abraham Lincoln."

It is only about 15 miles from York Springs, PA to Gettysburg, PA.

Overall, a fairly rare Dead Post Office marking on an blind stamped advertising cover. Between the advertising and the postmark - all three names of this town are mentioned (York Springs, York Sulphur Springs, Petersburg)

There is a vertical manuscript marking to the left of the address and under (right of) the manuscript marking showing the sender's information. "Copy of Note"






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Posted 05/12/2022   2:03 pm  Show Profile Check rlsny's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlsny to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Looking for some feedback on this stamp. I'm guessing type IV, but the line at the bottom barely looks like a recut to me, so looking for some opinions. Thanks.

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Posted 05/12/2022   2:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Ty II - 70R2
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Posted 05/12/2022   5:24 pm  Show Profile Check rlsny's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlsny to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Awesome. This was labeled as a Scott #9, nice to occasionally find an error in my favor.
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Posted 05/12/2022   8:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add widglo46 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Impressively quick plating, txstamp. I can see maybe how you do it - relief "B" and probably column 10 because of no visible guide dot. Still, you must keep some of the distinctive plating marks in your head!
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Posted 05/12/2022   11:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Caper123 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Though it only shows up on the lower half of the stamp you can still see the straight vertical line on the right. So , type II. 10th row limits the choices.
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Posted 05/13/2022   10:21 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
caper is correct - the vertical layout line at right is a giveaway here.

You have to be careful about the lack of a guide dot, since it could always be placed low, like 88R2 is, but the combination of the lack of a dot and a strong vertical layout line like this -- they are usually very fine, if present at all -- does point at the 10R column of plate 2.

Add to that, I just got through, earlier this week, looking at another 70R2, so the minutia of the position were fresh in my head as well.

The horizontal line below the E of ONE is quite visible here, but another consistent marking that is not noted in Neinken is the dot, or tick in the S of POSTAGE. It shows well on your stamp, and is consistent for 70R2 as a good plating mark. Update your Neinken book with that.
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Posted 05/13/2022   11:59 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Another thought, while its fresh in my head -
The other 70R2 I looked at recently had a fairly sizeable right margin, in addition to the obvious strong layout line.

In the interest of being fairly thorough, I studied the three columns on plate 2 where large right margins can be found: 10R, 10L and 1L. Note that the gap between the 1L and 2L column on plate 2 is large. A 1L column stamp can deceive you into thinking its a right margin stamp, quite easily.

A key takeaway from my looking at that was that the 10L column stamps have left-side ornaments which appear quite different from the 10R column left side ornaments. The 10L column stamps have much shorter overall left-side ornaments. I was looking at B reliefs. The 10R column B reliefs have much more complete left side ornaments overall. That should be another useful point of elimination.
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Posted 05/14/2022   01:23 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Sharing:

3c Washingtons in a block of four plated (by someone else) as 45-35-44-45R4. I haven't checked it yet. BURLINGTON, N.C. CDS, as best I can tell.

Also a strip of 4 - not yet plated. UTICA, N.Y. CDS

Stan Shepp


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Edited by stanshepp - 05/14/2022 07:09 am
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Posted 05/14/2022   01:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Also sharing some 1851, 1c Franklins?
69-69-78-79 Left Pane, Plate 1 Late
Listed by seller as unused, no gum.

Looks to have some lightened markings on the face - possibly used with a cleaned cancel. Crease across the bottom two stamps.

And an unplated strip of 3.

Stan Shepp


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Posted 05/14/2022   10:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dudley to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The strip looks to be 31-32-33L1L. Nice pieces.
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Posted 05/14/2022   4:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks, Dudley!
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Posted 05/14/2022   6:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Harper1249 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Man Stanshepp, you don't mess around. Beautiful specimen after beautiful specimen. The 3c strip of four looks to be 36,37,38,39L7.
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Posted 05/15/2022   09:17 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Harper1249 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Good morning all. I have plated this one to 3L7 and wanted to see if folks agree.
The impression is not very good but you can make out the shoulder gash and at least portions of one guide dot in the upper right corner along the right FL (basically in the corner). 3L7 has two upper right guide dots but I am not seeing the outer one. There is another "dot" slightly higher and to the right of the first one, but I was unable to find any guide dot pairs that fit this configuration. I was also wondering if this would be considered a dry impression versus a worn plate?
Hope all are well.

Regards,
Harper1249

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