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Show Your US 1851-57 Imperforate Stamps

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Author Replies: 2,438 / Views: 114,606Next Topic
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Pillar Of The Community
4500 Posts
Posted 08/09/2022   3:46 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
My first impression was "GOD GIVES US" around a cornucopia, being a use of a wax sealer normally used on the flap. The negative letters and central device would be in raised wax.
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United States
1965 Posts
Posted 08/09/2022   8:10 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Classic Coins to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
An Internet search proves you solved it, John. Nice job!
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2496 Posts
Posted 08/09/2022   9:32 pm  Show Profile Check sinclair2010's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add sinclair2010 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Brilliant!
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Valued Member
United States
169 Posts
Posted 08/12/2022   6:05 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The "GOD GIVES US" Cornucopia 'cancel' appears to be an impression from a wax seal.

An example of this seal is shown here on the ETSY artists page depicting wax seals on a wheel.

I thought that I had reported back here about this item, but I do not see the report now.

Stan Shepp



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United States
169 Posts
Posted 08/12/2022   6:21 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Sharing an unusual item today. Claimed by Siegel's Auctions as being one of only two known examples of a "W.E. Singer & Cos" manuscript precancel. On cover from a mining town in California - Bidwell's Bar. Site of the oldest Orange Tree in Californina and the first suspension bridge west of the Mississippi.

Just sharing for your entertainment.

Stan Shepp

Full Cover


Precanceled Stamp - W.E.Singer Co.


W.E. Singer Feather River Marking


Philatelic Foundation Certificate mentioning the precancel


Reverse of the cover


Wells Fargo, Marrysville manuscript marking on reverse


Enclosed Letter


Advertisement in the Weekly Butte Record, Volume 2, No. 10 - January 13, 1855 mentioning Gluckauf


Western Express Listing


Western Express Partial Census of covers


Illustration of Bidwell's Bar, circa 1853-54


Union House, Bidwell's Bar, Ca. circa 1855


The Gluckauf later Bendle store was the first stone building built in Bidwell after the fire in August of 1854. The original road into Bidwell was in the foreground in front of the store. Portions of the building collapsed over time but some exterior walls remained in 1964, making it the last standing sturcture at the old townsite


The Bidwell Bar Bridge, first suspension bridge of California, was transported from New York via Cape Horn 1853 and was completed 1856. Its site is now inundated by Oroville Reservoir.
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Valued Member
United States
169 Posts
Posted 08/12/2022   6:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here is an on cover example of the 3c Washington, Scott #11.

I cannot quite figure out what is happening around the toga button.

Anyone have any ideas?

Additional images from the cover included.

Stan Shepp



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898 Posts
Posted 08/12/2022   7:24 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Caper123 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Stan, have you plated the 11A above?

I have no clue about the button mark. Doesn't look like the known flaws I've seen before.
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169 Posts
Posted 08/12/2022   8:15 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have not even attempted to plate it. I have been crazy busy at both work and home. I scan some things in and share them to wind down after a busy day. This one jumped out at me as odd. I'm pretty sure that I've seen every position - and I've never seen anything like this before.

I think A relief, right inner line only narrows it down to 4 possibilities, but I'm away from my computer and on my phone only at the moment.

Stan
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Edited by stanshepp - 08/12/2022 8:21 pm
Valued Member
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352 Posts
Posted 08/12/2022   11:04 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ioagoa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hey Stan Shepp --

On your "missent" New Haven, CT cover -- the one where the stamp has the weird looking toga button -- I see a very faint LIL -- and plated it to 53L5L.

I have no explanation for what happened with the toga -- perhaps some foreign material on the plate?

Also -- the rust spots that are typical of this position (i.e., above the U.S. and below the HRE) -- are not very noticeable on your copy -- which is also unusual?

Still, by process of elimination -- I believe that your stamp has to be 53L5L.

Check it out and see what you think.

// ioagoa
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169 Posts
Posted 08/13/2022   7:47 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I think that you got it Ioagoa

Here is my 53L5L which shows the rust spots well, and that left frame line is about as light as it can possibly be and still be called recut.

The toga button might be a pinhole. I don't have it here right now to double check.

Both images for comparison follow.

Stan Shepp



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Pillar Of The Community
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1965 Posts
Posted 08/13/2022   8:12 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Classic Coins to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The mark on the toga button looks like something was stuck to the stamp for a long time, making a ring-shaped stain, then whatever it was fell off. I've seen similar marks on this issue, but it could happen with any issue.
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169 Posts
Posted 08/16/2022   10:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
(Possibly?) 13-14L1L in a beautiful deep Brownish-Carmine with what I will call a 3 line asterisk manuscript cancel and a manuscript "Ellery, NY Dec 7th" marking in the lower left.

Sent "IN HASTE" December 7th, 1852 from Ellery, NY (?) to the small mining town, Grass Valley, in Nevada County, California. Addressed to Jonas "General" Winchester, part owner and editor of the PACIFIC NEWS, former partner of Horace Greeley, founder of the New York Tribune and famous for the saying, "Go West Young Man!" Jonas did. All the way to California to mine gold laced quartz and to write articles about such for the Tribune.

The manuscript cancel is not very legible and I am left to guess that it is Ellery, NY. I am open to suggestions of a more accurate location.

It appears that General Winchester answered this letter on the 24th of January, 1853.

From the California State Library:
"Jonas Winchester, was born November 129, 1810 in Marcellus, New York.. He came to California, arriving July, 1849. He was part owner and editor of PACIFIC NEWS. In April of 1850, he was appointed State Printer by Governor Burnett. Before coming to California he was in partnership with Horace Greeley. Winchester was a pioneer in quartz mining in Grass Valley, California. He was also involved in the Globe Gold and Silver Mining Company in Monitor, Inyo County, California. He died in Columbia, Tuolumne County, California, February 23, 1887."
(There is a collection of Jonas Winchester items at the California State Library.)

Grass Valley, Nevada County, California, which was originally known as Boston Ravine and later named Centerville, dates from the California Gold Rush, as does nearby Nevada City. Gold was discovered at Gold Hill in October 1850 and population grew around the mine. When a post office was established in 1851, it was renamed Grass Valley the next year for unknown reasons. The town incorporated in 1860.

Death of Jonas Winchester:
Jonas Winchester, better known as " General" Winchester, died at his home at Columbia, Tuolumne county, February 23d, aged 76 years. In early life he was a printer in New York, and a personal friend and partner of Horace Greeley. Coming to California in 1849, he soon became part owner and chief editor of the Pacific News in San Francisco. He was appointed State Printer in April, 1850; held the office about a year and resigned in March, 1851. His publishing house having been ruined by fire meanwhile, he went to Grass Valley, engaged in quartz mining and wrote a series of valuable articles on that subject for the New York Tribune. It does not appear that he made a fortune at it, however, for he presently " returned East and for awhile was lost Bight of by his friends and acquaintances in California. But he finally returned hither, like most of those who spend any considerable time in our beloved State, and took up the business of fruit growing near Columbia, whence he now and then sent contributions to the Rural, his last being a Tuolumne county note, dated February 14th, which went to press the morning after his departure. He is spoken of as a man of intelligence, ability and courage; energetic, warm-hearted, enthusiastic, and a philanthropist both in theory and in practice. Since writing the above, a letter respecting him has come to hand from our venerable friend, John Taylor, who says: The short article from his pen in your issue of February 26th was his last effort for publication, and when it arrived the writer was still in death. We conducted the services on Sunday in the Odd Fellows' graveyard to a large and sympathizing congregation. We have known Mr. Winchester for 25 years, and can testify to his worth as a man and friend. He lived and died a consistent, and in many respects an enthusiastic, spiritualist, and the services were conducted on that principle. He leaves a widow, four daughters and a son; but they rejoice in the assurance that the dear patriarch still watches over the loved of home, and will see that no evil attends their footsteps.




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United States
169 Posts
Posted 08/16/2022   10:07 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
July 6, 1851 - 6th day of use. Plate 1 E (Because no other plate had been used yet) Scott #10A with the Earliest Known Use of the New York 11-bar cancel.

I have one used on July 8th, and I have it marked as the EKU - but this one was used 2 days earlier. So there's that.

Also, that is a nice un-plated stamp.



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United States
169 Posts
Posted 08/17/2022   12:16 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
A recent auction pickup.

I'm looking forward to its arrival.

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United States
171 Posts
Posted 08/17/2022   01:00 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Harper1249 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hey, I bid on that one.... and then it went up up up. Glad to see you got it.
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