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Show Your US 1851-57 Imperforate Stamps

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Posted 09/18/2022   9:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Classic Coins to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi 40yearBreak,

Here is another stamp from sheet position 43R4, although unfortunately with the guide dot cut in half.

The second image shows both of our stamps compressed to 10 percent of the original size vertically to show that the curves in the side frame lines match. It's hard to see,but 43R4 is one of the many plate 4 positions with an engraver's slip (or extra line) left of the left frame line. It is level with the tip of Washington's nose, and quite faint.



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Posted 09/18/2022   10:03 pm  Show Profile Check rlsny's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlsny to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks rgstamp, I still struggle, but I do enjoy making the attempt. The best seems to be 8L1L.
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Posted 09/19/2022   12:36 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Just showing some of My 1851-57 Imperforate Stamps (Like the Topic says)

A pair of #11A's (25-26R1L) - misdescribed as #10A's by Matthew Bennett (auction image included) and a sheet margin example on a folded letter.

The cancel color intrigued me. I thought maybe ultramarine, but probably not.

The letter is from a son to his father:

Commander Charles Platt, US Navy
Commanding U S Ship Albany
Pensacola Florida

Datelined "New York, Oct 29, 1851"

Stan Shepp










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Edited by stanshepp - 09/19/2022 08:24 am
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Posted 09/19/2022   07:56 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Are you Ladies and Gentlemen aware of Siegel's upcoming sale of the Houdon collection of the 1852-7 three cent issue?

https://siegelauctions.com/sales.php?sale_no=1265
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Posted 09/19/2022   11:57 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ioagoa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi rogdcam --

Regarding the Siegel "Houdon" sale -- YES -- very aware -- as have had the catalogue in hand for a few weeks now. Lots of nice things in this sale beyond the 3c Houdon material -- including Jim Allen's award winning 12c stuff -- and a phenomenal "fancy cancel" collection (which is the last lot in the sale -- lot 889 -- and was put together by Clyde Jennings).

Even if you do not collect fancy cancels -- you should check out the PDF that Siegel has linked -- 152 pages of fancy's (65 MB file size) -- what an amazing assemblage. Link to the Siegel PDF is here (hopefully it works):

https://siegelauctions.com/2022/1265/pdf/889.pdf

Regarding the 1851-1857 "Houdon" 3-cent stuff in particular -- It will be interesting to see how the realizations go with so many elusive varieties and "Amonette confirmed" colors hitting the market all at once. Plus, there is a gorgeous 1st day cover to boot!

Curious if anybody out there has any idea as to the provenance -- (i.e., Who is Mr. Houdon)?

Regards // ioagoa

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Edited by ioagoa - 09/19/2022 11:58 am
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Posted 09/19/2022   12:36 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It seems that Houdon refers to Jean-Antoine Houdon, the sculptor of Washington's bust and many other famous figures.
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Posted 09/19/2022   12:59 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add 40yearBreak to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Classic Coins,

Thanks for confirming my 43R4 plating, and for providing the additional image of the same location. It is unfortunate that the GD was cut in half as the size and location of the guide dot along with the extended RFL from the stamp below it at 53R4 are very strong elements of plating this 43R4.

Here is the next one I am going to attempt. This one has re-cut inner lines, so that eliminates plates 4, 6, 7, and 8. It appears to be a Relief A as I see no tessellation impingements, nor a break. I see no GD and no other re-cuts (but definitely could be wrong on the re-cuts).

I don't yet know how to judge FL strength, thin/heavy, clear/blurred/faint, but if I had to place a guess I would go with "Strong and clear" which would lean to plate 1L.

Again, if someone could confirm the Relief and push me in a direction of the most likely plate, I would appreciate it. Thanks.


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Posted 09/19/2022   1:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ioagoa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi rodgcam --

Understood that Houdon was the sculptor of the bust from which the 1851 3c vignette was modeled -- and thus an appropriate pseudonym for Siegel to use to protect the confidential identity of their consignor.

That said -- I have been collecting the 1851-1857 3c for decades -- and while some of the 3c material in their "Houdon" sale can be identified as having come from some previous major auction sales -- I am still curious if anybody has any idea as to the provenance -- as this is a major quality holding that has not seen the light of day for quite some time?

Regards // ioagoa


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Posted 09/19/2022   1:05 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ioagoa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi 40yearBreak --

You are correct -- the stamp in your most recent post is definitely a Plate 1L stamp and an A relief.

That "gouged out" dark spot at the top half of the URDB is a classic plate 1L tip-off.

Regards // ioagoa
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Posted 09/19/2022   5:19 pm  Show Profile Check rlsny's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlsny to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
seems to be 8L1L.

Can anyone give support or resistance to this plating of that unused type IV 1c. This is not for eBay by the way. Keeping this one.
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Edited by rlsny - 09/19/2022 5:20 pm
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Posted 09/19/2022   5:50 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rgstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
rlsny

I agree with your plating 8L1L
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Posted 09/19/2022   6:00 pm  Show Profile Check rlsny's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add rlsny to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for your help!
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Posted 09/21/2022   1:55 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Sharing an interesting cover from TOWANDA, Pa to SPRINGVILLE, PA -
with a nice, unplated, 3-margin, #11A and a JUN 30th TOWANDA CDS

manuscript notation in lower left corner - "NY & Erie RR" a note from the sender (same ink and penmanship)and not a Railroad Route Agent Marking.

Stan Shepp


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Posted 09/21/2022   4:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I shared this misdescribed pair last week. I contacted the Auction house and they agreed to sell them to me for a $45 hammer price - similar percentage as the price of the auction assuming they were #10A's.

25-26R1L

Fair Enough, Matthew Bennett.




Stan Shepp
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Posted 09/21/2022   7:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stanshepp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I posted this stamp and cover the other day, but as I went to log it in to my collection, I did an internet search for the commander as well as the ship "Albany" and it brought up the following auction listing:

From Kelleher Auctions, Sale No. 746, Nov. 18, 2020, Lot No. 2
It appears that it may have sold for $90 with the following description:

"U.S.S. Albany, Sloop of War, folded letter addressed to "Commander Charles T. Platt U.S.N., Commanding U.S. Ship
Albany, Pensacola, Fla.", franked with a 3¢ copper brown (10A) tied by a Lockport, N.Y. c.d.s., Oct 30 (1851); boldly
docketed "Recd - 9th Nov"; letter is family news. Estimate $150 - 200"

"Albany was built in the 1840s for the U.S. Navy. She was among the last of the sail-only wooden sloops and served
prominently in the Mexican War. Before and after her war service, Albany conducted surveillance and observation
missions throughout the Caribbean. She, along with her entire crew, was lost at sea in September 1854."


I have a couple of Copper Orange Brown examples, but even my certified copies aren't all an exact match (and I have some extremely odd shades of Experimental Orange Brown) So before I got out my color examples to check, I thought that I would plate this to see if it is even a candidate for Copper Brown. It has to be from Plate 2 Early in order to qualify.

The closest I could come is 15L2E and would like to get some feedback on that plating.

If someone else could take a look and see what you think, I would greatly appreciate it.

For the record, I paid $120 for it with the following description:

"Scott 10A, full margins at bottom and left incl. trace of frameline of adjoining stamp at bottom, just into at top, wide sheet margin at right, tied by bluish green "Lockport N.Y. Oct. 30" circular datestamp, 2+ page letter with address panel to "Commander Chas. T. Platt, U.S.N., Commanding The Albany, Pensacola, Florida", letter datelined Oct. 29, 1851, pencil note "Rec. 9th Nov." at top right, Very Fine.

The letter reads,

"My Dear Father,

I sit down to write today not because I have anything novel to communicate, but because I suppose there is one more chance to reach you before you sale from Pensacola.

Today our winter seems retreating again, and a mild air from the South gives us promise of more pleasant weather before winter descends upon us.

Yesterday we learned that the Silver Greys of Ontario Co. had bolted the entire Whig Ticket. They were dissatisfied because none of the Conventions from the State down to the County Conventions had approved the Compromise Treasury. Fillmore has just no chance at all for New York.

Henry Darm (?) has removed his Bank from Watertown to Ogdensburgh.

We are living on at the same old rate in Lockport. There is no change in our Parochial affairs.

Wheat is down so that that business rather lags. Look out for high prices for Port. Stock yourself soon.

The black beans from Mexico, which I planted, yielded abundantly. They ripen very fast, form an excellent string bean, and yield more than any other.

I have not heard a word concerning Lieut. Hunter since I came home.

Mother and Sandie seem to be enjoying themselves. Parties are pregnant & fun is copious. Sandie wrote to you last week. I mailed this letter Saturday.

I suppose the next must be sent to Havana. You must not forget to write us the last thing before you sail & let us know where you are going.

I hear nothing from the officers. Remember me kindly to them.

Affectionately,

Your son,

C.H. Platt"

According to ussalbany dot org --

USS Albany, was one of a group of eight full-rigged, three-masted wooden sloops built in the early 1840s that were the last American sailing sloops to be commissioned. The ship measured 147 feet 11 inches (45.1 m) long between perpendiculars and she had a beam of 38 feet 6 inches (11.7 m). Albany had a draft of 17 feet 9 inches (5.4 m) and had a tonnage of 1042 tons burthen. The ship had a crew of 210 officers and enlisted men. She could maintain a speed of 13 knots (24 km/h; 15 mph). Albany could mount up to four 8-inch (203 mm) shell guns and eighteen 32-pounder (15 kg) cannon. By 1853, she was armed with six 8-inch guns and sixteen 32-pounder cannons. The ship's keel was laid down in 1843 at the New York Navy Yard; she was launched on 27 June 1846, and commissioned on 6 November, with Captain Samuel Livingston Breese in command. Her construction was accelerated so she would be complete for the impending war with Mexico. Although she could carry 22 guns, Albany sailed with only 20.

Service History in war with Mexico

The sloop put to sea for her first cruise on 26 November 1846 and joined the Home Squadron—then engaged in operations against Mexican forces—on 8 January 1847 at Anton Lizardo. Soon thereafter, however, she left the Mexican coast for an independent cruise to the vicinity of the Azores. Upon her return to the east coast of Mexico early in March, Albany guarded the transport anchorage at Isla Verde in preparation for General Winfield Scott's operations against Veracruz. During the 9 March amphibious action, Albany landed the reserve elements under Brigadier General David E. Twiggs. Because the Mexican leaders chose not to oppose the landings, Albany saw no combat. Later, on 22 March, the sloop of war sent one of her eight-inch shell guns and its crew ashore to assist in the siege of Veracruz.

After Veracruz surrendered on 29 March, Albany moved to the next objective—Alvarado. The Mexican forces, however, had already abandoned that port and Lieutenant Charles G. Hunter, commanding Scourge, which arrived first, took possession of the town. Albany soon headed for another target, Tuxpan. She and the other ships of the squadron arrived at the mouth of the Tuxpan River on the morning of 17 April. Capt. Breese commanding Albany—then formed his landing party of over 1,500 sailors and marines drawn from all ships in the squadron. They embarked in the barges and the six ships chosen to ascend the river and capture Tuxpan. Although Albany herself did not participate in the action, Breese and his landing party did. From 18–22 April, Breese's force moved up the river, engaged and captured two artillery batteries, destroyed fortifications and military equipment at Tuxpan, and then retired down the river to rejoin the squadron. When the American warships dispersed to various blockade stations along the eastern coast of Mexico, Albany and Reefer remained off the mouth of the Tuxpan River.

During service on the blockade at various other points, Albany arrived off the mouth of the Tabasco River by 13 June. As in the Tuxpan operation, members of her crew joined an inland expedition. The movement upriver began late in the first dog watch on 14 June. In two days, the American force ascended the river, disembarked the landing force, routed the defenders on the approaches to Tabasco, and captured the town. The Americans remained there until 22 July, when yellow fever and Mexican troops forced the evacuation of the town.

Subsequently, Albany headed home for repairs. She left the Mexican coast on 11 July and arrived in Hampton Roads, Virginia, on 6 August. From there, she soon moved north to Boston where she completed her repairs on 27 September. On 10 October, the sloop of war put to sea to return to the Gulf of Mexico; she resumed blockade duty along the Mexican coast until March 1848, when she was sent to Venezuela to protect American citizens there during a highly volatile constitutional crisis.

Between 15 November 1848 and the latter part of 1853, the sloop made three more extended deployments in the Caribbean-West Indies area as a unit of the Home Squadron. On 12 December 1853, Albany set sail from Boston, Massachusetts. In May 1854, the commander had filed a report with the Secretary of the Navy James C. Dobbin that the main mast of Albany was unseaworthy. On 20 May, Victor Randolph, the former commander of Albany and now commanding officer of the Naval Yard Warrington, reported that an appropriate mast had been identified and was ready for Albany. During the replacement of the main mast, there was also some discussion of the condition of the fore mast. Apparently, both were replaced.

Last Cruise

Initially, CDR. Gerry had instructions to sail to San Juan, Cartagena, and Aspinwall (now Colón, Panama), and Albany set out on 29 June. By 11 August, instructions ordered CDR. Gerry to pass along the coast and to investigate a suspicious ship lurking near Saint Thomas. Additional instructions, sent separately, told CDR. Gerry to continue patrolling the Windward Islands and Grand Turk.

In line with its instructions, Albany arrived in Curacao on 7 September 1854, from La Guaira, Venezuela. She stayed in port for two days, and left on the morning of the 9th for Cartagena in Colombia, in what was then called New Granada. A letter from a Curacao correspondent of 19 September 1854 reported that all the crew were well. The sloop made an imposing appearance moored in the harbor and, upon leaving port, she saluted one of the forts with twenty-one guns, which was answered, and then saluted a Dutch ship, the corvette Palloo with eleven guns. On 28 September, Commander Gerry sent a report updating his superiors on the cruise, dispatched from Aspinwall. Albany departed Aspinwall, Colombia on 28–29 September 1854, intending to sail to New York. She was never seen again."


This second description does not claim that this is "Copper Orange Brown" (or even a Plate 2E) stamp, but it does point out the "blueish green" cancel. I checked Chase's article listing green cancels and he indeed lists Lockport, NY as having a green cancel on the 1851 3c Washington.

To me, it appears to be a blue cancel, possibly ultramarine (no one lists this color as coming from Lockport, NY) which appears more green on the blue envelope, but more bluish (or ultramarine) on the actual stamp.

Your thoughts are appreciated.

Thanks!
Stan Shepp



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