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Show Your US 1851-57 Imperforate Stamps

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Author Replies: 1,123 / Views: 33,348Next Topic
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Posted 07/31/2020   12:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Classic Coins to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi ioagoa,

Thanks for posting the extra line at right examples from plate 6. The extra line shows up nicely on them, which is more than I can say for my plate 6 examples.

Do you have any ideas on why plate 6 has this line? Between the eight and ninth vertical rows seems like an odd place for a guide line. Maybe they were trying to avoid another "three rows" event?
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Posted 07/31/2020   12:59 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ioagoa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi classic coins --

Regarding that faint so called "guide line" just to the right of the 8th vertical column of the right pane of plate 6 -- I have no idea why TCC put it there. The spacing between the horizontal rows and the vertical columns on all of plate 6 is fairly uniform with only a few minor exceptions noted by Chase.

In any case, that plate 6 extra guide line, when it is visible, sure does come in handy when plating -- as it narrows the C reliefs to only 2 copies (8R6 top row and 68R6 which is a misplaced C in a B row), the A's to only 3 copies, and the B's to 5 copies.

So, if ever anybody sees a stamp with this extra line -- it should be an "easy plater" -- as it is either from the 8th vertical column of the right pane of plate 6 -- or it is position 99R4.

Regards // ioagoa

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Posted 08/02/2020   11:16 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mootermutt987 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I think, first of all, I want to apologize for the quality of my scans. I looked through my Plate 3 3c 1851's and was disappointed to learn I have just one single 19L3. I thought I had 4, but the 3 in my stockbook were placed in the wrong spot - they are each 29L3's. Anyway, here is a wide shot of my Plate 3 Left. I've still got a way to go. I've been concentrating on other stamp things, but this conversation may motivate me to chase down these missing positions. Here it is:



I scanned my lone copy of 19L3 at 600 dpi (max for my scanner) and in black and white, hoping for better definition. It is a real pig of a copy, and the scan quality leaves much to be desired, but if you are able to blow up the right margin, you can (barely) make out a light 'extra line' that was discussed upthread. I was unaware of this line - thank you for bringing it to my attention. The stamp:

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Posted 08/02/2020   11:25 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Moyock13 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
mootermutt987, nice!

Where'd you find the plating sheet? I'd like to find a few of those.

Thanks.
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Edited by Moyock13 - 08/02/2020 11:26 am
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Posted 08/02/2020   4:12 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dudley to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Moyock, if I'm not mistaken the plating chart is from a series (Plates 1-3) produced by Leo Shaughnessy, and crops up for sale on eBay from time to time. I used to own a set.
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Posted 08/02/2020   4:48 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Classic Coins to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Carroll Chase never mentioned silk fibers being in the paper used for the 3-cent imperforates in his book, but Clarence Taft did in his 1964 article on silk fibers in USPCS Chronicle 47. Taft noted that the silk fibers are more often blue than red, and vary in length from 1 to 4 mm.

Here are three examples previously posted in another thread:

50L1L (full stamp and closeup):




7R4 (Watt plated, with some probable ink offset)



A red fiber on 59L3:

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Posted 08/02/2020   4:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stampcrow to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Mootermutt987, my first reaction is..., I can fill that 89L3 hole for you.

I'll have a look in my and get back to you.
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Posted 08/02/2020   4:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stampcrow to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Yup, sure enough I have the 89L3. I'll post a pic and we can be sure but if so than you welcome to it.
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Posted 08/02/2020   5:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stampcrow to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here we go. Message me If you want.
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Posted 08/03/2020   12:14 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mootermutt987 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Moyock - I got the plating sheet in a collection lot that I got at an Aldrich auction a number of years ago. I think it was an 1851 series lot (as opposed to a 3c 1851 lot) and it was actually a pretty good lot. There were 100's of 3c imperfs in the lot, many of them plated, and I got plating sheets for Plate 3 (Left and Right), but no extras. The ones I have were 60-70% full when I got them and I have added to them when I have a few extra $$$'s and time. They come along with collection lots every once in a while. If plating is your thing, they really are quite handy.

Stampcrow, I sent you an e-mail.
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Edited by mootermutt987 - 08/03/2020 01:54 am
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Posted 08/04/2020   10:55 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Moyock13 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Classic Coins, concerning silk fibers. One of my other interests is 1st issue US Revenue Stamps where silk fiber in the stamp paper wasn't until 1870. A book written by George Toppan and Alexander Holland, A Historic Reference List Of The revenue Stamps Of The US, discusses the use of the silk fiber.

I'll have to track down the Clarence Taft 1964 article on silk fibers in USPCS Chronicle 47. I'd love to read that.
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Posted 08/06/2020   7:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Classic Coins to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Plate 1L was placed in service in October 1851, and likely was used continuously until about March 1855, when it was permanently discrded due to exessive wear.

Carroll Chase wrote; "Stamps from the top row of plate 1 (L) from the very last printings show such decided wear that it is remarkable that it had not been discarded earlier."

Here are two top row printings from plate 1L. The 3L1L at left was almost certainly printed in 1851, while the 2R1L at right was almost certainly printed in 1855.

In addition to extensive plate wear, the 2R1L appears to have been under-inked, and it is faded.


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Posted 08/07/2020   11:51 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ioagoa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Classic Coins --

Those plate 1L stamps you posted demonstrate very nicely the differences in color and impression between the time that plate 1 Late was first put into service versus toward the end of its life.

Here are a few more examples of plate 1 Late "worn plate printings" -- all of which are in a color that Chase described as, "an odd color seen from plate 1 late worn printing impressions" -- and which do not fit within either of the typical 1854 rose red or 1855 orange red color families. In order, from top to bottom are the following 4 examples:

-- position 1R1L (with black Jun 30 Providence, RI cds)

-- position 1R1L (with hybrid bluish / black Dec 2 Oberlin, O cds)

-- position 3R1L showing the "short TA" in the top label block. (with black Jan 18 San Francisco, CA cds)

-- position 7L1L (with indistinct black SEP 24 town cds)

Regards // ioagoa

Note -- the usual disclaimer regarding identification of colors vis--vis online scanned images applies. More specifically -- because of variations in scanner settings, and because different display screens render colors differently, these images are not be suitable for confirming colors of stamps in hand or in other images.








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Posted 08/07/2020   6:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Classic Coins to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
ioagoa, thanks for showing those excellent examples of worn-plate, top-row, plate 1L stamps. They appear more "natural" than my example, which probably suffered from some post-use abuse.
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Posted 08/07/2020   8:28 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Classic Coins to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
While we're on the subject of plate 1L printings, here's another early plate 1L printing, position 64R1L.

This is one of my favorite stamps, as it has a lot going for it. It has four margins with sharp corners, and a probable New York & Phila railroad cancel. It also is one of two positions from plate 1L that didn't have the upper right diamond block recut (the other being 63R1L).

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