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As I Research I Am Learning So Much! Still Have Many Questions

 
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New Member

United States
1 Posts
Posted 05/17/2020   3:18 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add cehicks20 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I bought, WM fluid, and a perforation gage, I still have many questions... I figured I would start here....
-4 cent Washington. is this blue/gray paper? I looked at examples, it looked like it was.
-2/200 German overprint red/brown, stamp world referenced penetrated perforations, how can I tell if this is that?
-Definitives, does anyone have any insight on these. Glossy overprints?
Thank you in advance for your time



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Valued Member
United States
334 Posts
Posted 05/17/2020   3:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hoosierboy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply


The "glossy" overprints are on East German stamps. I think they were needed to reflect a change in postal rates or their economy?

Not sure how one can evaluate paper color without seeing the stamp in person.

There are many digital resources and probably a local club full of helpful folks. Start with the American Philatelic Society list of clubs and resources.

Enjoy our hobby and welcome to this digital community.
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Valued Member
United States
201 Posts
Posted 05/17/2020   7:50 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Germania to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Welcome. "Penetrated perforations" is not a standard philatelic term and I have no idea what it may refer to.

The East German stamps are part of a definitive series with the first set issued in 1953. Your overprinted stamps were issued in 1954 when postage rates went down. Virtually every beginner's album has some of these stamps. But don't be fooled by that - this is a complex series with a lot of varieties that will keep you busy for years if you specialize. Some varieties have 4 figure catalog values, but don't worry, the ones you have shown are not among those elites. Have fun!
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Pillar Of The Community
United States
937 Posts
Posted 05/17/2020   11:50 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add erilaz to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
"Penetrated perforations" may refer to a characteristic of some German inflation stamps that is mentioned in the Michel Deutschland-Katalog:

"Der sägezahnartige Durchstich verschiedener Inflationsausgaben ist so mangelhaft, dass für ganz fehlerlosen Durchstich ein Preisaufschlag gerechtfertigt ist." (The sawtooth-like rouletting of various inflation issues is so defective that a price increase is justified for completely error-free rouletting.)

But note: "Der bei einzelnen Werten angewandte sägezahnartige Durchstich ist als Nebenart anzusehen, da die Haupttrennungsart stets die Zähnung war." (The sawtooth-like rouletting employed for some denominations is to be regarded as a variant, since the main type of separation was always perforation.)

Here's an example of defective rouletting on a German Infla-Marke, from the German Wikipedia article on postage stamp separation:



Since cehicks20's stamp is actually perforated rather than rouletted, the distinction between well and poorly rouletted stamps would not apply.
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Valued Member
United States
128 Posts
Posted 05/18/2020   1:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add DStamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Cehicks20


Quote:
The "glossy" overprints are on East German stamps. I think they were needed to reflect a change in postal rates or their economy?



Quote:
** - Per Michel, all values exist with a shiny typographed overprint (g), and all values except the 40/48 and 50/60 Pfg. are also known with a dull lithographed overprint (m).
From: http://www.stamp-collecting-world.c..._FYPDEF.html, March 12, 2016


Typograph overprints have "built up" ink at the edges.
Lithograph will be even to the edges.
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Valued Member
Canada
24 Posts
Posted 08/01/2020   5:09 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Casey Magoo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi there and welcome to the hobby. Just remember that it takes many years to learn about stamps. The more you dig into catalogues and read articles and follow auctions, the more you will realize there is basic knowledge and advanced knowledge. Everyday people have neither so you are on the right track now.
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Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
4610 Posts
Posted 08/01/2020   5:29 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The odds are very much against your 4 cent Washington being "bluish paper" since it is strongly believed that none of the 4400 copies of the four cent stamps were distributed to post offices. Did you watermark it? What is the perforation rate? It is helpful when trying to see bluish paper to scan it against an orange background.
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