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South And Sw Africa ID Help

 
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Posted 07/14/2020   8:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add ronv to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I have purchased a collection of BC stamps that include many s. Africa and SW Africa. I have a Scott catalog but identification is a nightmare. Does an online step-by-step guide exist?
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Posted 07/14/2020   8:08 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Your perfunctory request, does little to help us.
Prepare your question thoughtfully, and start perhaps by addressing a particular stamp that has you baffled.
Describe it well, Scott number and / or place an image.
Than we can assist you, as you seek.

BC (acronym) = British Commonwealth
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Edited by rod222 - 07/14/2020 9:13 pm
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Posted 07/14/2020   9:05 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Calstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Ronv...

As Rod stated in his response specificity is critical, and photos/scans of the stamp(s) in question de rigueur.

Further, am not clear as to your reference to "BC stamps". More details, please.

IMO, one of the more challenging group of South African stamps is the 1926 - 1954 definitive series. Fortunately a well-written AND illustrated "tutorial" designed to help identify these often complex issues appeared on the Stampboards dot com discussion site in Jan 2008. Suggest you Google "Tutorial - South Africa - 1926 - 1954 definitive stamp series".

In addition to being written by a subject expert, the tutorial approaches the series on an issue-by-issue basis. And includes many tips to help ascertain the often subtle differences btwn the individual issues.

With a bit of internet research believe you may also locate an "identifier aid" for the long-running series which made its first appearance in 1961.

Closer: SCF is an amazing resource of philatelic knowledge. The generosity of the participating members is unparalleled. However, in order for a posting to be meaningful it must be clearly titled, include a clearly posed question or statement, and include a photo or scan whenever possible.

Look forward to continuing the "conversation".

Cheers.

Jim






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Posted 07/14/2020   9:21 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The "Orange Tree" is a typical head scratcher.........
http://www.rjbw.net/SixP.html
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Posted 07/14/2020   9:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Calstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Thanks, Rod. Appears to be another good resource.

My personal (South Africa) millstone is the one penny Dromedaris issues.

I have a plastic shoebox into which many SA issues are tossed pending the proverbial "rainy day". Which in SoCal is a rare occasion.
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Posted 07/15/2020   12:38 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I am in the same corner, Jim.
Put aside for a rainy day.
I am currently tackling Russia, an immense task.
I've just ordered another 4 packs of Prinz hinges.
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Edited by rod222 - 07/15/2020 12:40 am
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Posted 07/15/2020   10:03 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add KGVIStamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I recently posted a set of guides for the 1926-1954 set on the Facebook British Colonies Stamp Collector Group site along with an explanation of how to sort each of the values. Since you mentioned the 1d values, here is the image that I put together for the site. It shows the various initial versions of each of the 1d variations. (There were lots of printings). Hopefully it will help you make sense of the issues.

One thing you have to understand is what screened means in the description. The first printings were printed using either recess or rotogravure processes. But later printings were printed using screening which can be identified by looking closely at the stamp under magnification. You will see a series of dots making up the image. Find a stamp with the spelling of SUIDAFRIKA to use as a comparison (it will not be screened). As you compare it to stamps with the hyphen (SUID-AFRIKA), you will find some are similar because they were printed with the rotogravure process, and some were screened. Once you can identify them you will be a long way towards understanding how to identify these stamps.

If you have a Facebook ID, feel free to visit the group site. You can join if you collect British Colony issues, but the site is open to the public for browsing. The image on the Facebook site is larger. I had to shrink this one to fit the upload size limits.


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Posted 07/15/2020   10:45 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ronv to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Very helpful. The question was general and I now have some information to start with. I have several dozen of these stamps so no specific stamp yet to post an image of. Maybe later. Thanks.
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Posted 07/15/2020   10:46 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add KGVIStamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Rather than leave you with partial information on the 1d value, I am copying the complete article from the FB post I mentioned earlier, with just a few modifications because the other articles are not listed here.


The first issue of the 1d value was printed in London in 1926 by Waterlow. (SG 31, ST 24). Notice that SUIDAFRIKA has no hyphen. This issue will look like the 1930 design, but can be identified by noticing the shape of the letter R. The right leg of the letter curves in the 1926 printing and is short and straight in the 1930 version. Although the basic stamp is inexpensive, there is a variation that is perforated 13.5 x 14 rather than the normal 14.5 x 14. These were from the booklet panes of six and are quite scarce. The booklet panes were also created from the perf 14.5 x 14 stamps. So both perforation options are possible. Finally, there are inverted watermarks found on both of the perforation options. These same plates were used to produce stamps printed when production was moved to Pretoria in 1927.

In 1930 a new plate was created. (SG 43, ST 34) As I mentioned before, look at the letter R to identify this stamp. It will have a short, straight leg. As before, the basic stamp is inexpensive, but it also exists in a booklet pane of 6 that is quite scarce. There is also an inverted watermark found on this stamp as well. In 1931, the plate was altered and the shading on the sides was modified. Type I which was used in 1930 had 40 lines of shading, and Type II which was used in 1931 has 28 lines. (SG 43d, ST 35) The overall appearance is tight spacing in Type I and wider spacing in Type II. Luckily, the color of SG 43d is pinkish, so it is pretty easy to spot.

Beginning with the 1933 set, the plates were redrawn and you will find all of the remaining stamps labeled SUID-AFRIKA (with a hyphen between the two words).

The first 1d value was printed from this new design in 1934 using a design that was utilized until 1950. (CW 5, SG 56, ST 48) The stamp was printed in an 18.5 x 22.5 size format, and was unscreened. This stamp can be found with the typical perforation of 14.75 x 14 or 13.5 x 14 for the coil version. In addition to the coil version, Commonwealth lists seven different color shades that resulted from various printings during this period. But you can just collect one copy if you don't want to specialize in it. This stamp can be found in three different booklet panes of 6. You will find them with wide margins top and bottom, with and without advertising or postal slogans in them. The other pane of 6 has no margins on the top or bottom. There is also a pane of 2 that was issued in razor booklets.

In 1943, special coil stamps were printed. (CW 39, SG 106, ST 99) The design was altered and looks like none of the other issues. There is less detail and only one color, so they are easy to identify. You should also be aware that these stamps were printed in vertical strips, so they are collected in vertical pairs rather than the usual horizontal pairs. Commonwealth lists four shades for the 1d coil.

In 1950, the design was modified and the production method that resulted in an effect called screening was first used for the 1d value. (CW 26, SG 115, ST 49) Prior to this time, the stamps were printed in an unscreened format, but afterwards screening can be noticed. The screened stamps issued measure 18 x 22MM. However, there is a screened stamp that was printed in 1951 that measures 17.25 x 21.25. (CW 27, SG 135, ST 50) Commonwealth lists six color shades for the screened version and there is also a booklet pane of 6 with no margin.


If you are interested in the stamps from this time period from South Africa, please feel free to visit my web site using the link below. Look for the link to page scans. I have my complete South Africa collection displayed on the site.
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Learn more about King George VI stamps at www.KGVIStamps.com
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Posted 07/15/2020   12:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Calstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Thank you, KGVI. A very helpful side-by-side visual comparison of the various Dromedaris issues. Yes, differentiating the "screening" varieties can be challenging.

Also appreciate the tip re the Facebook site as well as your personal collection site.
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Posted 07/15/2020   12:47 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add EMaxim to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Adding my own thanks to the three members who responded. As ronv says at the outset, identifying these stamps can be a bit of a nightmare. I too will be using the info and links provided here when I get back to the task of sorting SA. Proof once more of the great value forum provides.
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Posted 07/16/2020   09:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ronv to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
ID these please.

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Posted 07/16/2020   09:55 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add KGVIStamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Look at the top portion of the stamps, and the center color. First, they are labeled SUIDAFRIKA with no hyphen, so they are either Scott 30 or 44. The center color is green and not blue, so neither one is Scott 44i.

Then notice the quality of the impression around the label.
The top one is well defined, so I think it is Scott 30. The lower one is poorly defined - note the areas with no ink. That makes me think it is Scott 44. Keep in mind that Scott lists three shades of green, so you still have to decide which one. But the impression is pretty well worn, so it might be the 1936 printing which is listed as slate-green. Keep in mind that without actually examining the stamp these are educated guesses.

Here is the image that I created for my Facebook post on sorting the 2/6 issues. I had to compress it to fit this site's size limits. You will have to find it on Facebook if you want a larger image.


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Edited by KGVIStamps - 07/16/2020 10:07 am
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