Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Newbie Soaking Question From An Oldbie

Next Page    
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 16 / Views: 548Next Topic
Page: of 2
New Member

United States
3 Posts
Posted 02/08/2021   8:43 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Vantzy to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
i am in my 60s and feel foolish asking this but I will.

I read some old posts here regarding soaking stamps. I noted that some people do not press them until they are dried using glass for example.

When I soak stamps I pressed them when they were wet and eventually when they were completely dry they came out Ok but it took forever.

But if there was any moisture at all they curl.

So letting them dry and curl and then pressing them under weight is the better day to do it? Who knew? Can someone confirm please?
Thanks. V
Send note to Staff
Edited by Vantzy - 02/08/2021 8:45 pm

Bedrock Of The Community
Learn More...
Australia
31666 Posts
Posted 02/08/2021   9:39 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Vantzy, my routine....
1. small lots max 30 stamps
2. soak in cool clean water
3. when paper releases , rinse in another bowl of cool clean water.
4, remove from water with tongs, place face up, on a brand new drying cloth, pat dry.

5. with tongs pick up each stamp, place face up on a A4 Freezer bag, that is on an old blank album page, or any A4 sturdy paper.

6. Place another sheet of clean A4 paper on top (this makes your sandwich)
7, Place sandwich in an old book, place a brick or weight on top
8, wait 4 days...bingo

Watch the fabulous dry flat as pancake Halibut stamps slide off the freezer bag, onto your desk.

PS Some stamps are ornery, and will curl like a cigarette
not often, but some do.
I gently caress the opposite side of the curl, with spade tongs
It is a tricky business.


Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by rod222 - 02/08/2021 9:47 pm
Valued Member
United States
390 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   12:37 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Calstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Welcome to the Forum.

Given the commonality of soaking (as a collector activity) much has been written on the
topic. If you scan through the SCF archives believe you will note some common
(time proven) steps.

Personally, recommend focusing on small batches (say, 50 stamps) at a time. Avoid
the temptation to use hot water. (While it may speed the soaking process, it will
likely result in other problems). Use two sets of clean (at least two layer) paper
towels. (One for "blotting". The other for drying.). Never soak stamps affixed to colored
paper. (The paper will "bleed"' and damage the other stamps.). Use spade-shaped
tongs to handle the stamps. (Not fingers.). And once the stamps are almost
air dried I place in a stamp drying book. (Readily available online for c ten dollars.)

Good luck. And have fun.



Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
67 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   09:07 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Mr. H to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I soak then lay them out on newspaper to dry, just make sure there's no colored ink on the newspaper pages. The newspaper helps to pull the moisture from the stamps. Once dry I just lay them out in my old catalogs and pile them up.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
336 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   09:43 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Vantzy - Welcome to this forum.


Quote:
So letting them dry and curl and then pressing them under weight is the better way to do it? Who knew? Can someone confirm please?


Letting them "almost" dry is the key. They still need to have a little bit of moisture in them before you press them with heavy weight.


Quote:
I am in my 60s and feel foolish asking this but I will.


"There are no foolish questions and no man becomes a fool until he has stopped asking questions."

A quote by the genius of electrical engineering, Charles Proteus Steinmetz.







Linus
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
3473 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   09:43 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add John Becker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
A dozen collectors will have a dozen methods. I have mine too!

One trick I have used for soaking stamps on colored paper is to soak each separately. Using a muffin tin lets me do 8 or 12 at a time. Soak face down with only the stamp immersed and leaving the colored paper mostly dry. Peel as soon as they come loose and transfer the stamp to a rinse bath. Not all can be saved, but most will be successful.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
Canada
3838 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   10:25 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Dianne Earl to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I let them almost dry before flattening them. This works well for me They are usually fully dry in a day or so.

Dianne
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Don't grumble that the roses have thorns, be thankful that the thorns have roses
Valued Member
36 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   12:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tsmatx to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have never mastered the 'almost dry' method. If I put them under weights when they are slightly damp, they still are not dry completely after several days and if they are dry they stick to the paper. I am also worried about this method causing mold/mildew. So I usually wait for them to completely dry (overnight) then put them under lots of weights but it takes a very long time (months++) and some of them still have curl--especially newer issues which are more plasticky paper.

It seemed easier back in the day. I'm not sure if local environment factors (humidity, and hard/soft water) play a role. I have mostly given up soaking my own stamps and just let the experts do it.


Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United Kingdom
764 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   12:48 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Ringo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have never pressed a soaked stamp or used a drying book. There's no need at all. Just lay the wet stamps on a clean tea towel and leave them until they are dry. They can be patted with another part of the teatowel, or another clean one if you want to speed up a little. Sure they curl and feel crispy when dry, but they pretty soon they are back to normal. They just flatten out naturally.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
29 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   1:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add poofo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have a similar routine.

My "sandwitch" is an old 140lb album page, sheet of Yupo paper, stamps (face up with backs on Yupo), and another 140lb album page on top. Everything should be acid free. I use Yupo because 1) I have it around the house anyhow, and 2) it stays flat & crease free even when I'm clumsy.

https://www.amazon.com/Yupo-Paper-L.../B004XC7CE8/

That bit rod222 has in step 3 about a second rinse in clean water is very important. I have skipped it a couple times, and had the faces of my stamps stick to the album page because gum was in the water.

If I get a curled one, I put it on an old, curved blotter and gently mash it with another bit of paper. That usually works. For super unruly ones I carefully wrap them around a fat pencil. :)

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Bedrock Of The Community
Learn More...
Australia
31666 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   2:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
and had the faces of my stamps stick to the album page because gum was in the water.


Yep! That was my experience in my first days of soaking.
Some of the early commonwealth stamps, (Malay states) for example, had thick yellow Gum Arabic, turned the water yellow sometimes

I like your advice "around a fat pencil" not tried that.

Biggest trick I learnt, not tying to soak the world's stamps on paper. I soak only those I want to mount, and leave the rest to others.

I follow John's advice, face down for those on yellow Manila envelopes, must try the muffin tin
Red envelopes I don't even bother, 100% failure rate.


Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
643 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   4:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add alub to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Stamps curl because they are not drying evenly. This is often due to a thin, uneven, layer of gum on the stamp. Changing the water often can help prevent this.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
649 Posts
Posted 02/09/2021   4:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add funcitypapa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Personally, I soak up to 20 stamps at a time in cool water. When they separate from paper, if there is a slippery feel to them, I soak again in a separate bowl of cool water to get the residue /gum /slime off then pat dry between two paper towels and when dry put them face down on a white title page of a hardback book. Close the book and then turn book over so the bulk of pages serves as a weight. Don't touch the book for 24 hrs. By then, stamps ready to mount in album etc.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Israel
606 Posts
Posted 02/10/2021   6:42 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Rob Roy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
poofo, you talked about the "140lb album page" - is it made of gold or osmium? I never saw a 50 kg page. I dread to think how much the whole album weighs.

Most members said they dry on some sort of paper. Is there a disadvantage in using a tea towel or any other cloth?
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
United States
4344 Posts
Posted 02/10/2021   6:52 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add redwoodrandy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
United States
58 Posts
Posted 02/10/2021   6:55 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Inkmanno1 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Soak, then lay side by side in one of those Desert Drying books that soak up a lot of the moisture. Usually dry enough to handle in a couple to 3-4 hrs max. Then into the kids old math books to flatten. I tend to leave em to flatten for a few days and they turn out really nice.

Not one to be happy and always looking for another direction, I do like the idea of glass or plexiglass/plastic and will likely try that method for pressing. Just to see if it's any better than what I do now.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Page: of 2 Previous TopicReplies: 16 / Views: 548Next Topic  
Next Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2021 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.52 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05