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The DE LA Rue Stamps Of New South Wales

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Posted 04/02/2021   4:36 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
THE 1862-69 ISSUES


The 2d stamp was the first produced by De La Rue. The plate, a printing press, and 120,000 stamps (500 sheets of unwatermarked paper, each of 240 multiples, gummed and perforated) were included under the company's invoice of 28th October 1861. The plate and stamps arrived in Sydney in January 1862 with the printing press arriving the following month. The stamps, which are pale blue in colour, were issued to the public on 25th March 1862.

The first printing from the plate in Sydney commenced in April on the paper manufactured for the Diadem issue. The watermark was a double-lined 2. This paper was exhausted by September, whereafter paper with a double-lined 5 watermark was used, pending the arrival of a further supply of double-lined 2 paper in October.

De La Rue supplied paper watermarked with a single-lined 2, the first shipment arriving in Sydney at the end of 1862, but it was not used until April 1863, by which time the old stock had been used up.

Owing to the exhausted supply of single-lined 2 paper, printings on thin unwatermarked paper were done in November and December 1865 and December 1867, and on paper watermarked single-lined 1 in August 1867.

All of the 2d stamps printed in Sydney were perforated 13 line, with the exception of some of the double-lined 2 printings, which were also perforated 12 line and 12x13 line.



Watermark double-lined 2, double lined 5, no watermark




Watermark single-lined 2




Watermark single-lined 1


The double-lined 5 watermark is usually poorly centred due to the size of the sheet. The single-lined 1 and 2 watermarks can be found in all four positions ie: normal, inverted, reversed and inverted reversed. Hutson notes that the single-lined 1 watermark normal and the double-lined 2 watermark inverted reversed are rare.

There are variances in shade, depth, and clarity of the Sydney printings, from pale to cobalt to Prussian blue, as can be seen in the images above.

There is also a wide range of thickness and texture to the single-lined 1 and 2 paper, which can be explained by the fact that the paper was handmade. That said, Chafford Mills was providing machine made paper for the production of Great Britain stamps from December 1864.

In the first dispatch of the single-lined 2 paper in August 1862, 101 sheets of retree (a second grade paper) was included. In a letter dated 28th June 1871 to the Government Agent, De La Rue gave an indication that all of the paper supplied prior to May 1870 was handmade. According to Basset Hull, no further single-lined 2 paper was supplied after 26th April 1870.

Some of the single-lined 2 paper supplied was highly surfaced, as evidenced by Hutson's example postmarked 18th December 1863 at Corowa. He states this stamp is perforated 12½ but how could it be the same gauge (which is actually 12½-12¾) used in various colonies (eg: Trinidad, Bahamas) from mid 1863? No printings on this paper were done in London and Sydney did not have a 12½ gauge machine. The only suggestion I can offer is the stamp is perforated 12½-13 but happens to measure 12½ on all four sides. The perforations surely could not have been faked, as there is a fragment of the above stamp at the top left still attached.

There is an example on single-lined 2 paper in the Royal Collection perforated 12. As this gauge was discontinued in July 1862, and this paper was first used in April 1863, the only explanation I can offer is that the perforations are particularly well faked.

In the Stanley Gibbons Monthly Journal of November 1902, an example was reported with a double-lined 1 watermark. Hutson did not mention this stamp, but it was listed by Gibbons in the 1912 Part 1 catalogue. I would suggest that it was a misread marginal watermark from the single-lined 1 or 2 paper, which says "NEW SOUTH WALES POSTAGE" in double capital letters at the top and bottom of the sheet. This marginal watermark rarely appears on the stamps.

The plate was printed in four panes of 60, each in ten rows of six. The marginal inscriptions on the plate are "POSTAGE TWO PENCE" printed horizontally across the centre of the right pane at the top and bottom of the sheet, and "PRICE.–2d. per Label. 1s. per Row of Six. 10s. per Sheet of Sixty." vertically on the outsides. Basset Hull states there is the marginal inscription "In affixing the stamp be careful not to remove the cement." but I have not seen an example bearing this.

Above the sixth stamp in the top row of the left pane and below the first stamp of the right pane there is a + sign, which I believe are pinning marks for perforation. At the top and bottom of the left panes are the plate number (a white 1 in a coloured bordered oval) and the control number (a coloured 7 in a coloured rectangle with indented corners).

The gum on the London printed stamps was white. The first printings done in Sydney had thick brown gum that often stained the paper. This gum was used on the early printings of the single-lined 1 and 2 paper but by the middle of 1864 a white gum was being used.

According to Basset Hull, the number of 2d stamps printed on the various papers is set out in the table below. I have included the 120 stamps he allocated to the double-lined 1 watermark to the single-lined 2 watermark.



An 1864 cover from Sydney to Cowra
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Edited by Bobby De La Rue - 04/02/2021 4:41 pm
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Posted 04/02/2021   8:19 pm  Show Profile Check 64idgaf's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 64idgaf to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Lovely work Bobby.
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Part 2 cont'd

The 1d stamp was the next produced by De La Rue. Their invoice dated 20th October 1863 included the plate, 110,160 stamps (459 sheets of 240 multiples, gummed and perforated) and 34 reams on paper. The paper was watermarked with a single-lined 1. These stamps were issued on 1st April 1864.


An early dated example of the London printing


The London printing is in a light red. Hutson had three unused examples of this stamp perforated 12½, which he believed were perforated by De La Rue with the same machine used for other British colonies. Is it not possible that De La Rue perforated a sheet of the 1d stamp with the 12½ gauge machine?

The first Sydney printings from the plate were done in April and May 1864, comprising of 480,000 stamps. The mercury in the ink damaged the plate and it was returned to De La Rue. In the interim, the 1d Diadem plate was used, pending the arrival of a second plate in October 1864.

The London printing from the second plate was 220,800 stamps (920 sheets) on unwatermarked paper. These stamps were issued in early 1865 and are again in a light red colour.

Owing to paper shortages, printings on thin unwatermarked paper took place during the first half of 1866, and on paper watermarked single-line 2 in March and April 1869.

All of the Sydney printings of this value were perforated 13 line and range from dull, to brick, to brown red.

The number of 1d stamps printed on the various papers is set out in the table below. These figures are again taken from Basset Hull.



Hutson thought the stated number printed on unwatermarked paper was too high, but the ratio of my own holdings of 1d and 2d stamps printed on unwatermarked paper are close to those given by Basset Hull.

As for the 2d, the single-lined numeral watermarks can be found in all four positions. Distinguishing the Sydney printings of plates 1 and 2 can be done by dated cancellations or a thorough knowledge of New South Wales postmarks.

The plate was printed in four panes of 60, each in ten rows of six. The marginal inscriptions on the plate are "POSTAGE ONE PENNY" printed horizontally across the centre of the right pane at the top and bottom of the sheet, and "PRICE.–1d. per Label. 6d. per Row of Six. 5s. per Sheet of Sixty." vertically on the outsides.

Above the sixth stamp in the top row of the left pane there is a + sign. At the top and bottom of the left panes are the plate number (a white 2 in a coloured bordered circle) and the control number (a coloured 3 in a coloured rectangle with indented corners).


Plate 1, Sydney printing


There is no mention in either Basset Hull or Hutson of the plate and control numbers for plate 1, although it would be difficult to believe that the plate number would've been anything but a white 1, probably in a coloured bordered circle, although an oval like the 2d is possible.


Single-Lined 1 Wmk shades



No Watermark shades



An 1865 Sydney cover
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Part 2 cont'd

The next two stamps produced for New South Wales were the 4d and 10d values. These stamps were produced on plates of 120 subjects, in two panes, each of ten rows of six. They were issued to the public on 21st September 1867.

The paper is watermarked with a single-lined 4 or 10 to match the face value, with each pane enclosed by a single-lined frame. They are both perforated 13 line, with the 1893 printings of the 10d on this paper being perforated with different gauge machines.

There were 990,000 4d stamps printed to September 1876 and 180,000 10d stamps printed to June 1872. The 4d is known with the watermark inverted.

The marginal watermark inscriptions are "NEW SOUTH WALES POSTAGE" at the top and bottom of the sheet, in double-lined capital letters, "FOUR PENCE" or "TEN PENCE" in the right margin, and N S W with a scroll pattern either side in the left margin, all the lettering in double-lined capitals.

At the top of the right pane and the bottom of the left pane are the plate numbers (a white 1 in a coloured bordered oval for both values). At the top of the left pane and bottom of the right pane the control number (a coloured 4 and 5 for the 4d and 10d respectively) in a coloured rectangle with indented corners).

The 4d stamp was issued to pay double rate intrastate letters however from the 1st January 1868 it could also be used to pay the registration charge.

Hutson and Basset Hull both state that the 10d stamp was issued to cover postage to Great Britain via Brindisi but this service did not commence until January 1870. The stamp was issued to prepay ½oz letters to Great Britain via Marseilles.


The two shades of the 4d and the 10d




An 1868 (24th February) cover showing the 4d used for payment of registration




An 1867 (23rd November) part cover to Scotland
showing the 10d payment via Marseilles
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Posted 04/06/2021   10:59 pm  Show Profile Check fairdinkumstamps's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add fairdinkumstamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Watching this with great interest Bobby.

I would be interested in your actual stamp numbers for this observation:

Quote:
Hutson thought the stated number printed on unwatermarked paper was too high, but the ratio of my own holdings of 1d and 2d stamps printed on unwatermarked paper are close to those given by Basset Hull.
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https://www.fairdinkumstamps.com Fair Dinkum Stamps - Specialising in stamps from early Australia and the colonies, Australian philatelic literature, catalogues, stockbooks and accessories.
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Posted 04/06/2021   11:24 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks fairdinkumstamps

I have 6 1d and 7 2d - all used.

The Hutson auction had 7 1d and 3 2d - all mint (lot 484).

Carrington (lot 660) had 1 mint example of each and 12 1d and 17 2d used.
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Posted 04/07/2021   02:05 am  Show Profile Check fairdinkumstamps's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add fairdinkumstamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Re no watermark 1d:


Quote:
I have 6 1d


So you would have about 60 single-lined 1 (10 times the no watermark number)

and 2 or 3 single lined 2 watermark (half the no watermark number),

in keeping with Basset-Hull ratios?
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https://www.fairdinkumstamps.com Fair Dinkum Stamps - Specialising in stamps from early Australia and the colonies, Australian philatelic literature, catalogues, stockbooks and accessories.
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Posted 04/07/2021   02:40 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, I have 62 single-lined 1 and 3 single-lined 2 1d stamps.
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Posted 04/09/2021   05:24 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I have 6 1d and 7 2d - all used.

The Hutson auction had 7 1d and 3 2d - all mint (lot 484).

Carrington (lot 660) had 1 mint example of each and 12 1d and 17 2d used.


Just a quick update on my unwatermarked stamps.

I went through my numeral cancellations (no small feat) and now have 11 1d and 10 2d.

With rare exception (eg: the 1864 1d above, which was offered all by itself), my DLR stamps have very largely come to me via bulk purchases and breaking down collections. Numerals have been purchased with no regard (and in most cases no description) of watermark or perforation.

Part 3 tomorrow
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Edited by Bobby De La Rue - 04/09/2021 05:26 am
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Posted 04/10/2021   12:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Part 3

THE WATERMARK SMALL CROWN OVER NSW ISSUES


The initial supply of this new paper arrived in Sydney in July 1870, and was first used for the 1d value in April 1871. The paper comprises 240 subjects in 4 panes of 60, in ten rows of six stamps. A single-lined frame encloses each pane. The marginal watermark inscriptions are "NEW SOUTH WALES POSTAGE" between the two upper and two lower panes and at the top and bottom of the sheet. The watermark is rare in any position other than normal and usually is easily seen. The limbs of the N and W of NSW meet at sharp points.





Stanley Gibbons have, at least since 1930, shown the issue date of the 1d as August 1871. Basset Hull stated that he had seen postmarked copies dated 18th May 1871 and I have a pair dated 14th June 1871, which was submitted to Gibbons in May 2019 so the catalogue could be corrected. I believe there was a transcription error by Gibbons of August 1871 for April 1871 many years ago.

The 9d stamp was next to be issued. The initial printing was done in August 1871. According to Basset Hull the date given for the issue to the GPO is 4th September 1871, however the Government printer reported to the Treasury that the stamp was ready for issue on 5th October. Hutson states the stamp was issued in October 1871 but I have an example dated 7th September 1871.

The 9d stamp was issued by overprinting the 10d value, and paid the via Brindisi ½oz letter rate to Great Britain. The overprint measures approximately 14.5 millimetres in length.

The 2d value was issued in November 1871, followed by the 6d on 1st January 1872. The plate for the 6d was made in Sydney, the die having been sent to Sydney along with the dies for the other four values. The plate comprised 120 subjects, in two panes, each of ten rows of six. The marginal inscriptions are similar to the 1d and 2d values, with the wording changed to reflect the face value.

At the bottom of the plate are G.Pr.O. and the monogram TR, for Thomas Richards, the Government printer. These inscriptions are both in white on a coloured background.

In May 1876 a one shilling stamp was issued, the die and plate having been sent to Sydney by De La Rue earlier in the year. The plate showed the plate number 1 and the control number 7, both shown at the top and bottom of the sheet in inverse positions. There are no other marginal markings or inscriptions.

The final De La Rue stamp to be issued with this watermark was the 4d value, first printed in September 1876. Hutson states he had an example dated March 1877. The last of the paper watermarked single-lined 4 was part of the September 1876 printing, which may at least partly explain why there is a gap between the printing and the earliest known dated example on the small crown watermark paper.

Until May 1881, all of these stamps were perforated 13 line. The original colours were brick red for the 1d, Prussian blue for the 2d, pale red-brown for the 4d (not as pale as those on the single-lined 4 paper) and the 9d, bright mauve for the 6d, and black for the one shilling.


Wmk. small crown/NSW - perforated 13 - original colours


By 1876 the 2d value was being printed in a deep Prussian blue and two years later in a pale blue. This shade is different from the pale blue on the single-lined 2 paper. In 1878, the 1d stamp appeared in a salmon colour and the 6d in a pale lilac. Later printings of the 4d and 9d are found in a deeper shade than the initial printings.

In May 1881 a new perforating machine, gauging 10 line, was introduced. With the exception of the 9d value, each denomination can be found perforated 13x10 and 10x13, with the former being more common. All values can be found perforated 10 simple and these are more scarce than the compound perforated stamps, although the 6d perforated 10 is more common than that perforated 10x13.

The 1d is known printed in scarlet and perforated 10 line in 1882 and the 2d is known perforated 11x12 comb in 1884. These stamps were printed after the introduction of the large crown over NSW watermark.

There were two further printings of the 9d, in October 1873 and May 1876. These stamps were issued to the pubic sparingly up to 1896. They can be found perforated 11x12 comb and line perforated 12, 12x10, 11, 11x10, 10x11 and 12x11, proving the stamps were not perforated at the time of printing.

The ½oz letter rate to Great Britain via Brindisi was reduced to 8d on 4th July 1876, rendering the 9d stamp largely obsolete, although the 9d rate still applied at this date, for mail sent via Naples, to certain other European countries, such as Austria and Belgium.

The stamps on the locally made 6d plate were more widely spaced, rendering the printings of this value unsuitable for the 11x12 comb perforating machine.

Stanley Gibbons still list the one shilling stamp perforated 11 line, but do not offer a price. Hutson believes it is a case of a mistaken watermark and since I've never seen or heard of an example for sale I can only agree with him.

With the exception of the 9d, all values perforated 13, along with the 1d salmon perforated 10 and 13x10, are known with the watermark inverted. The 9d perforated 11 is known with the watermark reversed.

Basset Hull states that De La Rue despatched 1646 reams of this paper from London between May 1870 and June 1880, enough to print 197,520,000 stamps.


An 1872 cover to London via Brindisi




An 1876 cover to London via San Francisco


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Posted 04/10/2021   12:42 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The 1d pair referred to above.

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Part 4

THE WATERMARK LARGE CROWN OVER NSW ISSUES


The first supply of this new paper was sent out from London in December 1881, arriving in Sydney about 3 months later. Apart from the different shape of the crown, the limbs of the N and W meet at rounded corners. The paper is thicker than that used for the small crown watermark. The watermark is rare in any position other than normal.





Printing of all values, except the 9d, commenced in April 1882, with the earliest dated example being 20th April 1882 on a 1d stamp. The initial colours were the same as the last issued on the previous paper. The 9d was next printed in January 1897 on surfaced paper with the surcharge now measuring about 13.5 millimetres in length.

The 13 gauge perforating machine was retired towards the end of 1882. Many stamps with the large crown watermark that are perforated 13, either simple or compound, are very rare.

The 1d stamp was printed in orange-red by December 1882 and dull scarlet by 1886. The 2d reverted to a Prussian blue in May 1882, the 4d to a dark brown by 1886 and the 6d to mauve in September 1882.

A comb perforating machine gauging 11x12 was introduced in 1884, with two machines ultimately employed. Hutson states the January 1884 earliest known date is most likely a clerical error, as was suggested in Basset Hull's book. Hutson's earliest date was April 1884 but I have a 2d pair postmarked 27th March 1884 at Sydney.

Later, two more single line perforating machines were introduced, one gauging 12 in April 1885 and the other gauging 11 in December 1885. The size of the holes of the 12 machine appear to be the same as the machine used in the early 1860s, so it may be that the old machine was brought back into use, perhaps having been refurbished in the interim.

With the exception of the 6d value, stamps perforated with the gauge 12 or 11 machines are rare. The 4d and 6d values are known perforated 12 simple, the other stamps with this gauge being compound with the 10 or 11 machines.

The 1d, 2d, 6d and 1/- values are known perforated 11 simple, the other stamps with this gauge being compound with the 10 or 12 machines. One stamp, the 4d dark brown perforated 12x11, is absent from the Stanley Gibbons catalogue.

Another stamp absent from the Gibbons catalogue that Hutson identified is the 1d perforated 11x12 line. He stated that the 2d and 4d may also exist but mentioned that these stamps would be almost impossible to distinguish from those comb perforated unless they are in blocks. The 1/- stamp may feasibly exist too, along with the 9d watermarked small crown.


The earliest known date of the 11x12 comb perforation



The 4d and 1/- perforated 11x12 comb, the 1/- perforated 10, and the 6d lilac perforated 10, 12, 12x10 and 10x12 are all known with the watermark inverted. These can also be found with the OS overprint.

Stamps with the small crown or large crown watermark can be found showing the single-lined frame, but I am not aware of any stamp from either paper escaping the watermark entirely.

In 1884 new plates for the 1d and 2d values were prepared. There were new marginal inscriptions on both plates.

On the 1d plate, a monogram TR for Thomas Richards, the Government printer, in white on a coloured circle, appears at the top and bottom of the sheet, above the second stamp of the left pane and below the fifth stamp of the right pane respectively.

In the corresponding positions on the 2d plate is the date '1884' in white on a coloured bordered circle.

On both values, above the fifth stamp of the right pane and below the second stamp of the left pane appears G.Pr.O. over N.S.W. This is in white in a coloured rectangle with rounded corners for the 1d, and in white in a coloured rectangle with indented corners for the 2d value.

Between the upper and lower left and right panes are the words "POSTAGE ONE PENNY" or "POSTAGE TWO PENCE", which appear twice, one on top of the other.

In the side margins of the 2d plate is the inscription "PRICE.–2d. per Label. 1s. per Row of Six. 10s. per Sheet of Sixty".


1d with the Government Printing Office monogram
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Posted 04/13/2021   05:58 am  Show Profile Check fairdinkumstamps's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add fairdinkumstamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
From Part 3:

Quote:
With the exception of the 9d, all values perforated 13, along with the 1d salmon perforated 10 and 13x10, are known with the watermark inverted. The 9d perforated 11 is known with the watermark reversed.


Do you have any comment/research on the rarity of these watermark variations Bobby De La Rue?
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https://www.fairdinkumstamps.com Fair Dinkum Stamps - Specialising in stamps from early Australia and the colonies, Australian philatelic literature, catalogues, stockbooks and accessories.
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Posted 04/14/2021   02:59 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Bobby De La Rue to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi fairdinkumstamps,

Only that they are rare and I that don't have any



Part 5


THE WATERMARK NSW (STAMP DUTY PAPER) ISSUES


Owing to occasional shortages of the crown over NSW paper, the 1d and 2d values were printed on stamp duty paper. The watermark is "NSW" in single-lined capitals, which falls across a horizontal pair of stamps.

The watermark layout is in two panes surrounded by a single-lined frame. The words "NEW SOUTH WALES" in double-lined capitals are at the top and bottom of each pane. At the sides of each pane are the words "STAMP DUTY", also in double-lined capitals.

Because of the size of the plate, the paper was turned 90 degrees, so that the "NEW SOUTH WALES" watermark appears at the sides and the "STAMP DUTY" watermark at the top and bottom of the sheet.

Stamps from the edge of the sheet have straight edges and show part of this lettering. The stamps at the outside corners of each pane escape the watermark altogether.

A total of 5,040,000 1d stamps were printed between December 1886 and May 1888, and 3,000,000 2d stamps were printed between December 1887 and May 1888.

Due to the course nature of the stamp duty paper, the impression of these stamps is not as sharp as on the usual watermarked paper. Both values can be found perforated 10 line or 11x12 comb.


1d and 2d, watermark NSW
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Posted 04/14/2021   07:03 am  Show Profile Check 64idgaf's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 64idgaf to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Such great work Mr DLR. We see the results of your work but not the mountains of stamps and many, many hours it takes to distill this information.

Thanks.
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