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So Who's Afraid Of The Indian States?

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Pillar Of The Community
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Posted 04/15/2010   08:40 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I'm busy for a few days, earning a living, but I promise to return eventually and tackle Hyderabad.
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Posted 04/21/2010   09:29 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Back again, and on to Hyderabad, one of the biggies of the Indian States.

It was by far the largest of the States, with a population of around 17 million when India gained independence. It was one of the States which didn't care to show its English name. With one exception, all Hyderabad stamps were inscribed with the title 'the Nizam's Dominions'.

Hyderabad was also an early starter, for the Indian States: its first (1 Anna) stamp appeared in 1869



These were nicely engraved in London. As an economy measure, perhaps, Hyderabad released two locally engraved values in 1870



SG 2-3

These and the first issue were reprinted. The reprints are easy to pick because they're in the wrong shades/colours and are perf 12 instead of 11.

Next followed one of those sets that every older collection of the Indian States has at least one of:



The set appeared in seven values, from the letter rate Anna above, to 12 Annas, over nearly 40 years. It has quite enough specialist interest to keep anyone happy: certain values appeared with and without watermark, in three different perforations, with an endless array of shades (here is another Anna shade, on cover)



and with some interesting plate flaws, such as missing dots in the Persian inscriptions, and missing design features.

The Anna was surcharged Anna in 1898



(This is a small curiosity. It has the error 'Dot at top of central inscription omitted'. This is listed for the basic stamp, but not for the surcharged version. And no - I didn't scratch it off.)

In 1900, Hyderabad tried its hand again at producing a stamp locally: a Anna (for the postcard rate) to replace the surcharge:

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Posted 04/21/2010   10:08 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
nice although I m glad id idnt buy these I can doso now
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3547 Posts
Posted 04/21/2010   10:22 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
In 1905, Hyderabad finally replaced the old, clapped out POST STAMP set with a new one, inscribed POSTAGE



again in values up to 12 Annas ... and to be found perf 11, 11 to 12, 12 and 13, and compound. An interesting study, if you don't mind risking your eyesight and sanity.

In 1915, Hyderabad issued two values, Anna and 1 Anna, as combined postage and revenue types



which also exist perf 11, 12, 13 and compound.

The POSTAGE Anna and the Anna of this set were surcharged in 1930. Interestingly, the surcharges increased the values of the stamps, although not by much - about a tenth of a penny Sterling on the lower value, and two-tenths on the higher. I haven't seen any postal forgeries

Here are the two surcharges used together on a cover:



Then, in 1927, Hyderabad finally got around to issuing a 1 Rupee high value (worth around 1/6 Sterling at the time)



These are distinctly scarce fine used. Grab it if you see one.
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Posted 04/21/2010   10:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
what used / never not in a zillion years. mnh for me
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Posted 04/21/2010   7:57 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
In 1931, Hyderabad issued a recess-printed definitive set of 8 values, from 4 Pies to 1 Rupee, which basically lasted the rest of the State's philatelic life. Very attractive they are, too:



The three low values in particular were used very heavily, and there are many good shades, unlisted in Gibbons.
A selection of shades of the 1 Anna:



These and earlier issues can be found imperf, at a price. Before putting your money down, check that the paper is watermarked. There are relatively more common plate proofs in issued colours, on unwatermarked paper.

New postage rates required three new values in 1947. This is the top value:



SG 57

This appeared in a new shade in 1949. The difference is so great, it really deserves its own, rather than just an 'a' number in Gibbons:



SG 57a

In the last days of the Hyderabad post office, some more new values were needed. A Anna was provided by dusting off the old plates from 1915, and reprinting in claret - the colour that is. A 6 Pies stamp was printed, also claret, in the same design as the 1931 4 and 8 Pies. A 2 Pies stamp was also prepared, to cover an increase in the postcard rate:



This was printed in litho, by taking a transfer from a (recess) plate of the 4 Pies, and altering each '4' by hand to '2'. Rather shakily: you could probably plate any single stamp from this issue, if you had a mind to
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Posted 04/24/2010   03:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hyderabad also overprinted most of its definitives for use as official stamps.

The earliest issues were handstamped with the official overprint, but they seem to be a bit of a minefield. There are many types of handstamp, and Gibbons only shows one of them. This might possibly be an SG O11a, but I'm not very optimistic



Overprints also occur on the reprints



so I generally avoid these stamps.

Later, proper machine overprints were introduced:



This example is on SG O24.

For a while, Hyderabad dropped the use of Official overprints. When it reintroduced them in 1909, it used a smaller version of the overprint. This remained in use until the end of Hyderabad's philatelic life. As an example of the small overprint, here is one of the gems of my Hyderabad collection, SG O40gb



- pair, one stamp overprint omitted

And a mint one for Spock



SG O53 in a plate block

And to round off Hyderabad, a few miscellaneous items.

As I said at the outset, most of the Indian States stamps were only valid for use within the States that issued them. However, Hyderabad cut a better deal with the British. In return for agreeing to deliver British Indian letters in Hyderabad territory free of charge, the British in turn allowed the use of Hyderabad official stamps in British India, outside Hyderabad, without the need for British Indian stamps. This cover was sent from Hyderabad to Indore (which was another State, and which issued stamps)





without adding British Indian stamps to carry it beyond Hyderabad's borders.

For perfin lovers, you can occasionally find Hyderabad stamps with a SJE perfin



SJE stands for Salar Jung Estate. Sir Salar Jung was a long-time Prime Minister of Hyderabad, and a noble with a large estate of his own. These stamps were used - as so often with perfins - to prevent pilferage.
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Posted 04/24/2010   05:12 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
hooray I am not here by myself anymore Tony is here

although I am exhausted and havent donr much since my last post :)
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Posted 04/24/2010   06:38 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You think you're exhausted? I've just worked through eight Japanese patents
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Posted 04/24/2010   07:38 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
yeah? try working through 22 hours on stamps in 40 degree centigrade without a fan and a chair if you are standing afterwards we will talk :)

y dont we switch I like working on patents you like stamps? que pasa?

B C where are you I am going to make Bc er I mean turtle soup?
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Posted 04/25/2010   05:14 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Idar is quite a contrast to Hyderabad. Idar is one of the bad boys of the Indian States. Gibbons refused to have anything to do with it until after it had died philatelically.

Idar's first stamps weren't the problem.



(SG 1)

They sidled onto the stage in about 1932, but were hardly noticed by the outside world. They were followed in 1939, by similar designs, but with the panels around the portrait coloured instead of white



(SG 2)

which appeared in conjunction with the white panel types. There were several printings, distinguished by shade and perf gauge, between 1932 and 1943, in both white and coloured panels. These were the workhorse issue. They were used for single rate letters



(SG 1a)

and for registered letters:



(SG 2a)

Then Idar blotted its copybook. In 1944, it released a set of 4 values, up to 4 annas, representing the registered letter rate. If you check the relative prices for mint and used in Gibbons, you'll get an inkling of the problem. The top value - 4 Anna, SG 6, is rated at a modest 4 mint, and a rather healTheir 110 used. These stamps were sold off to collectors mint, in booklets of 32 (eight sheets of 4 stamps) in volume, and very few were actually used. Here is the 4 Anna on cover:



For some time, the only actual evidence this set had been used at all was a single, blatantly philatelic, cover organized by a local Army officer, addressed to himself. Hence the nasty odour around Idar. Fortunately Gibbons did finally come to accept that, fishy or not, these stamps were a genuine issue, and were genuinely used.
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Posted 04/25/2010   05:21 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
very nice uncle tony

now please take a break aqnd tell me how you store stamps so they dont become yellow. and how do you avoid the humidity and mildew and foxing problems. you are the only expert left that ihavent consulted. thanks.
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Posted 04/25/2010   05:23 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Idar also issued a number of postal-fiscals - revenue stamps that were also available for use for postage, between 1936 and Idar's philatelic demise in 1948. As these were overwhelmingly used for revenue purposes, you should scrutinise any examples for sale very closely for signs of removal of fiscal cancellations.

Some of the designs were a trifle on the - how shall I put it? - gaudy side



Some values can be found in uncut printer's sheets, like this SG F5



showing pairs imperf between.

Covers showing the proper use of the postal fiscals are definitely not common



(SG F5b)

So there you have Idar. One of my favourites, unlike Indore which I'll tackle next.
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Posted 04/25/2010   05:32 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
now please take a break aqnd tell me how you store stamps so they dont become yellow. and how do you avoid the humidity and mildew and foxing problems. you are the only expert left that ihavent consulted. thanks.


I'm afraid I can't be much help. I live in Melbourne - the Australian one, not one of the pale imitations elsewhere - where we notoriously have at least four seasons in one day. I know well what it's like to work in 40 degree heat, and also to work with the radiator 2 cms from my chair. But it's a fairly dry climate, so we don't have much problem with mildew, as long as you regularly air your collection.
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Posted 04/25/2010   08:28 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
darn it. do you know how difficult it is to find an expert with brains and no ego these days? and after you find one its a real shocker if they dont have the experience. You must go to barwani with mnh stamps when youc ome back you will have all the knowledge and everyone can benefit
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