Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

So Who's Afraid Of The Indian States?

Previous Page | Next Page    
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 757 / Views: 128,673Next Topic
Page: of 51
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/26/2010   03:15 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The first stamps of Indore are inscribed 'Holkar' State. This was not a mistake: Holkar was the name of the ruling dynasty of Indore. In pre-British times, each of the states was known by the name of its ruling family. The British, for whatever reason, chose to refer to the states by their largest town or capital city. Some States, like Indore (and Hyderabad) refused to play along, although Indore did eventually fall into line.

I've been taken severely to task elsewhere for suggesting that Indore stamps are dull ... so I'll leave it to the reader to decide.

The first stamps appeared in 1886, a single Anna value, lithographed by Waterlow



(SG 2)

They come on thick and thin paper, in several settings - if you can be bothered. Things looked up considerably in 1889, when supplies ran out, and Indore produced a handstamped provisional Anna:



(SG 3 and 4)

in two types, differing in the form of the letter 'L' in the Hindi inscription. The scarcer type is on the left. These should not be confused with this



which is a revenue stamp, although it's sometimes offered as SG 3 and 4 above.

In 1889, Waterlow produced a four-value set in recess:



(SG 5)

The 1 Anna value on 'very thick wove paper' is supposedly scarce: Gibbons rates it at 75 mint, against 3.50 for the ordinary paper. Of course, if I'm selling it ...

Maharaja Shivaji Rao Holkar, who appears on the set above, was deposed by the British in 1903 after becoming a trifle unstable, and was replaced Tukoji Rao Holkar III. Perkins, Bacon produced a nicely printed set of six values for him:



This is SG 10, and a block of plate proofs of the same value. Plate proofs of Indore from this and subsequent printings by Perkins, Bacon are fairly common. They can add a bit of interest to a display, but don't be led into paying fancy prices for them. This block would be worth a few tens of s only.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/26/2010   03:50 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
In 1904, Indore overprinted these stamps SERVICE for official use. Here's an example of their use on cover:



In 1908, the British moved on Indore, and its neighbour Bhopal, and had both states agree to close their post offices to the public, so that all subsequent issues were for government use only. Some very odd things happened to the Service overprinted stamps of Indore: the remainders were sold off to dealers, and there are hints that the printers in London may have been allowed to print off more copies, 'to complete sets'. Whatever the story, there's a bit of a smell around these stamps.

In 1927, a new, long set from Anna to 5 Rupees appeared for the new ruler, Yeshwant Rao Holkar II, again recess printed by Perkins. Bacon.



(SG 30)

This is a rather involved set. To begin with, there were colour changes for several values, yielding some quite difficult stamps. Then, Perkins, Bacon used five different perforating machines on the set, all gauging from 13 to 14, but distinguishable with a good perf gauge. Gibbons list the gauges known for each value, but don't price them. There are almost certainly rarities lurking away, not generally recognized. Then, for reasons unknown, Indore specifically ordered some values imperf during the 1930s. An economy measure during the Depression? Whatever, they're fairly scarce. Here is a strip of the 2 Anna



(SG 21a)

Finally, there are plenty of plate proofs around, both in issued and unissued colours:



Again, not expensive.

In 1940, the (quite redundant) 2 and 5 Rupee values of this set were surcharged more usefully and Anna, and an equally redundant 1 Anna was reduced to 1 Anna:




(SG 33-35)

There is a rare error on the Anna on 5 Rupee, with a double surcharge, black over green. The black fairly well covers the green, but it is usually just visible. Worth looking out for!

Also in 1940, Perkins, Bacon having died, and the War being on, Indore switched to a Bombay printer for its last set, half-a-dozen useful low values, and a 2 and 5 Rupee for the collectors:



(SG 39a, and the pride of my Indore collection) and



(SG 43)

Indore quietly vanished into obscurity in 1948.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
2663 Posts
Posted 04/26/2010   11:55 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
yes I would have taken you to task again fascinating. I must scan some of my beautiful indian stamps in the winter. it is too humid to take them out right now:)

sigh feels like a private screening
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
2663 Posts
Posted 04/26/2010   11:56 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
btw indore has not vanished it is stilla very thriving place
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/26/2010   7:08 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
My Lonely Plant India describes Indore as India's Detroit.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/27/2010   02:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Jaipur is deservedly popular. It never put a foot wrong in design, even if the execution occasionally left something to be desired.

It was a large state in Rajputana (now Rajasthan), not too far West of New Delhi. Jaipur town is a popular tourist destination, also deservedly.

It came on the philatelic scene rather late, in 1904, with a set of three lithographed values:



The Anna blue comes in three types, one common and the other two rather difficult. They're not really hard to distinguish. Focus on the English 'HALF ANNA' down the right-hand side.

In the very difficult (i.e., I don't have one) first type, the two words are almost always run together 'HALFANNA'.

In the second type, they're short:



In the third, common, type, they're long:



Later that year, these were replaced by the same three values, recess printed by Perkins, Bacon, in a reduced size. This is the 1 Anna:



(SG 7)

These stamps were normally perf 12, but also occur perf 12 and compound 12 and 12. The latter are much better items; the 2 Anna perf 12 is quite a nice find.

These seem to have been satisfactory, because the next year Perkins. Bacon printed a long set, from Anna to 1 Rupee. Here are the 2 and 8 Annas on a cover



(SG 12 and SG 14)

which must have been enormous. The basic letter rate was only 1 Anna.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
2663 Posts
Posted 04/27/2010   02:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
oh I have the complete jaipur set from the later times I must say those stamps are good. I always liked this state. I had my own haveli not too far from there at one point in time
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/27/2010   02:43 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
In 1911, Jaipur must have decided it could do without the expense of having its stamps printed in London. It turned instead to the Jaipur Jail, where the State printing press was established. The results were, how shall we say?, a little less polished than the Perkins, Bacon product, but of far more interest to the collector. Four values were printed type-set: here is a sheet of the Anna



Apart from the fact that the whole sheet is printed double, there's also a stop missing after STATE (Row 3/1) and a large J in JAIPUR (row 1/2). Other values have other mistakes - well, what do you expect when you get the local crims to do the printing?

These stamps have always been popular with collectors, and you can still pick up sheets of the and Anna values for a few dollars. Commercially used are much harder, and covers are rather uncommon. This cover with the three high values, paying the 3 Annas registered letter rate, is one of my prized possessions:



(SG 19, 20 and 21)

The next year, Jaipur realized that these had been a bit of a mistake - not calculated to raise Jaipur in the esteem of collectors. Letterpress plates were prepared of the Perkins, Bacon designs, and printed locally. This is the local Anna:



(SG 25)

All values were reprinted, but the 8 Anna is only known overprinted for official use, and the 1 Rupee is a real rarity.

These stamps were initially perf 11, and with a papermaker's watermark in the sheet. Not many stamps in the sheet show the watermark: they're worth looking out for. In 1928, the , 1 and 2 Anna and 1 Rupee were released perf 12, on a different paper. These are distinctly more scarce than the perf 11 types.

In between, Jaipur decided to use up surplus stocks of the Perkins, Bacon 8 Annas and 1 Rupee stamps by surcharging them in Hindi '3 Annas', for the registration rate. Fairly easy to find, and they look rather attractive, with the red surcharge:



(SG 32)

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/27/2010   09:35 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
In 1931, Maharaja Man Singh was invested with full authority as ruler. In keeping with the practice at the time elsewhere in the Empire, Jaipur issued a long commemorative set, with a ridiculously high top value of 5 Rupees, or 80 times the basic letter rate. It was a very attractive set, designed by T.I. Archer, who also did the designs for the 1940 definitive set of India amongst other things, and printed in offset-litho, very expertly, by the Indian Security Press, who printed Indian stamps. I wish I could show you the whole set, but it's still on my to do list, and at 250 this year ... Here are a few odd values from the set:





Jaipur followed this with a definitive set based on the design of the Anna, showing the Maharaja's head, at first inscribed "Postage & Revenue', then later just 'Postage'.



(SG 52-57)

In 1936, the 5 Rupee from the Investiture commemoratives and the 2 Rupee from the last set were surcharged 1 Rupee:



(SG 69)

I should make the point here that all these rupee high values are very scarce indeed genuinely used. (Gibbons rates SG 69 above at 11 mint - and 90 used.) Forged cancellations exist: either pass on used copies, or only buy them from a trustworthy and knowledgeable source. (Modesty forbids ... )

Jaipur issued a more restrained set for the Maharaja's Silver Jubilee in 1947, but these were finely engraved by De La Rue:





Sad to say, they're very easy to find. Gibbons value of 11.50 for this set is very flattering.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/27/2010   10:46 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Jaipur also produced two Anna surcharges on the Anna stamp, to cover the postcard rate. These were probably intended to meet temporary shortages, and both are uncommon. The first appeared in 1938:



SG 70

and this one, at the end of 1947. This was the last ordinary stamp issued by Jaipur: in April 1949 it was merged into the newly created State of Rajasthan. While the printers took good care of the last surcharge (Gibbons doesn't list any errors), things were rather different this time:



This shows the error with PIE for PIES on stamp 2. There are also errors with the bars at left vertical, the surcharge inverted, and the surcharge double with one inverted - and both of these with the other errors as well. For what should be fairly scarce stamps, these seem to be suspiciously readily available. Caution would seem to be indicated!

In 1928, Jaipur started to issue official stamps, overprinted SERVICE, in either seriffed or block type. All the block type overprints are distinctly scarce mint, though the and Anna stamps are common used. The 8 Anna and 1 Rupee with the seriffed overprint aren't too difficult mint (although the 1 Rupee used certainly is), and the 8 Anna and 1 Rupee with the block overprint are very difficult indeed in any (presentable) condition.

Here is the 8 Anna with the seriffed overprint:



SG O7, and the 1 Rupee with the block overprint



SG O12

Now you may think the perforations on these are pretty ratty, and you'd be right, in one sense. But it appears to have been post office policy to reserve the most horribly perforated and centred stamps for government use. Well, they were only public servants, after all

And speaking of the perforations, Gibbons notes that these stamps occur perf 11, 12 or compound - but doesn't price them. If you have the patience of Job, it can be an interesting exercise trying to measure the perforations on these stamps, and see what you come up with.

In 1932, the 2 Anna was overprinted Anna:



SG O17

Unused (they were issued without gum), these are quite scarce; used, they're quite common. This pattern is repeated later as well.

Four values of the Investiture commemoratives were overprinted SERVICE. The Anna used sells by the kilo, if you're lucky enough to find a buyer. The 4 Anna



SG O16

is a different matter.

The later POSTAGE and POSTAGE & REVENUE types were also overprinted, and again, there are some rarities. The 4 Anna POSTAGE & REVENUE is the standout: mint, Gibbons rates it at 375 (used it's 12, so scrutinise any 'mint' copies carefully!)

In 1936, the Anna POSTAGE type appeared, briefly, with the old block SERVICE overprint:



SG O31, and a scarce stamp mint or used.

In 1947 and 1948, as the State post office was winding down, there were three surcharges on the official stamps. First was a 9 Pies:



SG O32

Gibbons grossly overprices this at 3.75 mint or used; the mint price might just be justified, but the used price must be a typo.

Next was a similar overprint to the last overprint on the ordinary stamps:



SG O33

which is also known surcharge double, one inverted



SG O33a, making it rather hard to read the value

And finally, in December 1948, another 9 pies surcharge:



Before leaving lovely Jaipur, one last rather charming little oddity. If you decide to take on Jaipur, you'll find that registered postcards crop up regularly.



SG 72 and 76

Why, you may ask, register a postcard? Jaipur moneylenders used to send out their reminders to recalcitrant payers with them. Registering the postcard guaranteed it would attract the attention of everyone, including the postman. And if the postman was a friendly, chatty sort of bloke, keen to pass on all the gossip as he did his rounds ...
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/28/2010   01:53 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Jammu & Kashmir is the 800 lb gorilla of the Indian States. If you feel you need to prove your masculinity, you must tackle Jammu & Kashmir

It (for convenience, rather than 'they'; it was a single State) issued its first stamps in 1866. It was the second Indian State (after Soruth, of which more later) to do so. And it did so in quite uncompromising style, with three values, handstamped from single dies, on local paper:

The Anna



(SG 14 - somewhat similar to SG 1, but more clearly printed, in a deep instead of grey- black)

a 1 Anna



(SG 15)

and a 4 Anna



SG 5a (the blue printings produce some particularly attractive shades. The pigments were all natural: the blues were made from ground lapis lazuli, imported from across the mountains in Afghanistan.)

So, you either love or hate these, but it's hard to remain unmoved one way or the other. I fell in love with them at first sight, from black & white illustrations in an old copy of Gibbons, as a child. The collector giants of the 19th Century were all proud to include Jammu & Kashmir in their collections - and this may give a hint of one problem with them. They aren't cheap. SG 14 up above is the cheapest of these Circulars, at 28 mint, and the prices go up from there, to the first blue Anna, SG 2 at 3250 ... if you could find one for sale.

Another problem, and a nasty one, is that there are more reprints, imitations and fakes out there than there are of the real thing.

The commonest are the so-called 'Missing Die' imitations. Missing Die because, when they first started to appear not long after the Circulars were taken off sale, collectors noticed differences in design. However, as the stamps were coming from the Jammu & Kashmir Post Office, they were taken to be genuine. In fact, it appears that some enterprising post office officials printed their own imitations of the genuine stamps, inserted them into the official stocks, and sold off the genuine stamps for their own benefit.

The Missing Die stamps are easy to pick from the genuine, once you know what to look for.

Here are the Missing Die (left stamp) and genuine (right stamp) Haf Anna:



The most obvious difference is the semicircular line in the central circle. In the Missing Dies, it's more bent, and touches the circle. In the genuine types, it doesn't touch the circle.

In both the One and Four Anna stamps, the key is the vertical line in the central circle. It should point to between the letters in the ring above it, not straight at one of the letters. Here are the Missing Die and genuine One Anna:



and the Four Anna - again Missing Die at left, genuine at right

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/28/2010   02:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Now, supposing you're satisfied you have a genuine type, you're not out of the woods yet. There are also reprints! A few simple rules will eliminate many possibilities.

If the stamp is on European wove paper, it's almost certainly a reprint. (The only exceptions are two Half Annas and a One Anna in red, which are extremely rare. The old rule of stamp collecting applies here: faced by the choice between worthless reprint and expensive rarity, assume you have the worthless reprint. Unless you're selling, of course )

There were probably no reprints made on European laid paper. There are a few items of doubtful status on laid paper, but they may be worth something to a specialist, so all isn't lost.

The reprints are much more clearly printed, and on thinner and smoother paper than the originals. This can be a matter of judgment, requiring an original for comparison. But if it looks very nice, it's probably bad The originals are also scarce in multiples larger than pairs, but the reprints can be found in larger blocks. A nice block of four is probably a reprint.

If your stamp appears to be genuine, and not a reprint, the next step is to work out if it was printed in watercolour or oil. Often, the answer is obvious. This used copy of SG 1 is obviously watery



When the watercolour ink wasn't over-diluted, it can stand up in ridges of dried ink. This example is actually from a Jammu stamp (which I'll discuss later) but you can see the ridging of the ink.



The oil colours, on the other hand, tend to produce flat impressions, with the oil obvious soaking into the paper:



(An example of the printings of uncertain status on European laid paper)

If all else fails, there is one final test. Moisten a piece of fine cloth and gently wipe over part of the stamp. If the colour comes off, it's watercolour.

Cancellations: used copies will have watery magenta or black smudges as the cancellations, like in the examples of SG 1 above. They never have nice CDSs like this:



(This type of overprint was only introduced 15 or so years after the Circulars were withdrawn.)

And if you've passed all these tests, congratulations! You may well have a genuine Jammu & Kashmir Circular

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
2663 Posts
Posted 04/28/2010   02:37 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add spock1k to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
yo modesty forbidden uncle Tony

what would hapen if I used the jaipur issues today on a letter and sent it to you. would it be considered a real used copy or would it be a forgery or would it mean a rarity. Please let me know I am serious this can very easily happen. Thanks
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/28/2010   02:45 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
And do remember Mac Gillycuddy's Iron Law of Indian States Stamps: There is almost always an exception
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 04/28/2010   02:52 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
what would hapen if I used the jaipur issues today on a letter and sent it to you. would it be considered a real used copy or would it be a forgery or would it mean a rarity. Please let me know I am serious this can very easily happen. Thanks


I suspect your Post Office would refuse to recognize it, and I would be charged postage due
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Page: of 51 Previous TopicReplies: 757 / Views: 128,673Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2020 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2020 Stamp Community Forums
It took 6.33 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05