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Canada 1937 Mufti Coil Stamps Scott 238, 239, 240

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Posted 07/05/2021   6:10 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add jogil to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
The regular perforations for Canada coil stamps from 1930 onwards has had the perforations mostly located directly across from each other on both sides. These perforations were perforated by a rotary bar perforator.

However, some Canada 1937 Mufti coil stamps have now been found with the regular perforations for coil stamps from before 1930 which has the perforations mostly not located directly across from each other on both sides. This same configuration has been found on all blank coil roll start and end tabs. These perforations were perforated by a rotary wheel perforator.

Regular Vertical Perforation Positions vs Irregular Vertical Perforation Positions vs Regular Vertical Perforation Positions

Regular Vertical Perforation Bar Positions Across vs Irregular Vertical Perforation Wheel Positions Across (Unusual to find on coil stamp perforations from after 1929)

Regular Vertical Perforation Bar Positions Across vs Irregular Vertical Perforation Wheel Positions Across (Unusual to find on coil stamp perforations from after 1929)
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Edited by jogil - 07/06/2021 07:51 am

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Posted 07/05/2021   6:48 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
some Mufti coil stamps have now been found with the regular perforations for coil stamps from before 1930


Nice to know Jogil...<i had noticed it but never looked further..Good info...Even some Scott 191 [die-I] perfs lined up and not lined up.

Robert

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Posted 07/05/2021   7:06 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
wert: For the bar and wheel perforator, the horizontal perforations would be more across from each other than the vertical perforations would be.
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Posted 07/05/2021   7:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add stamporator to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Wert.

Your right-hand Scott 191 stamp would not look so dramatic if you aligned the perforations starting with the first perforation on the right.
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Posted 07/05/2021   7:36 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
stamporator..you are right..mistake..did it again

Robert



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Posted 07/05/2021   10:16 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Even some Scott 191 [die-I] perfs lined up and not lined up.


I am confused here.
Is Sc191 a coil stamp?
If it is just a line perforated postage stamp, should the perforations line up?
I think not.
Open to correction.
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Posted 07/06/2021   06:52 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
rod222: I agree with you, Scott 191 is a sheet stamp and not a coil stamp. Thus, different perforator(s) was/were used. If one observes the coil stamps from 1930 onwards starting with Scott 178, there appears to be mostly perforation alignment. Where as for coil stamps from 1929 and before ending with Scott 161, there appears to be mostly no perforation alignment. There can be the occasional exception as perforating wheels did sometimes align.

Canada Scott 191 (Die II)/191a (Die I) is a surcharged Scott 165 (Die I)/165a (Die II) sheet stamp. For BABN web-fed rotary press printed stamps, the usual line perforation configurations would be horizontal bar perforations (Kiusalas 11-70=11.25 horizontal gauge) which should mostly line up on both horizontal sides and vertical wheel perforations (Kiusalas 11-72=10.94 vertical gauge) which should mostly not line up on both vertical sides. With regards to perforating wheel produced perforations, there can be an occasional line up.

What I was trying to say with this posting is that I went looking at all of the different CBNC coil stamps with Kiusalas 8-99=7.95 vertical gauge from 1935 to 1943 starting with Scott 228 and ending with Scott 267 and I found this perforation alignment inconsistency on only some but not all Scott 239 and Scott 240 coil stamps. This inconsistency is expected from wheel coil perforators. It is unusual to find this on coil stamp perforations from after 1929, except on all blank coil roll start and end tabs. Where as for all of the other coil stamps, there was perforation alignment which is expected from bar coil perforators.
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Edited by jogil - 07/06/2021 07:52 am
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Posted 07/06/2021   07:07 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks Jogil for the confirmation.
I did learn that for coils, depending on the method of puncture,
that perforations do not align. That was a surprise.

Thanks for the explanation.

As an aside, I was reading how, in 1904, a stamp editor was complaining about collectors "flyspecking" regarding perforations,
line v comb, explaining how difficult it could be to identify.
Yet is is so simple, looking at the dimples in each corner.

Perhaps he had never seen a comb perforator.
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Edited by rod222 - 07/06/2021 07:13 am
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Posted 07/06/2021   07:29 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here is another picture showing the lines differently than the above but still unaligned.

Irregular Vertical Perforation Positions (Unusual to find on coil stamps from after 1929)
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Edited by jogil - 07/06/2021 07:53 am
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Posted 07/06/2021   08:13 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Examining larger multiples like coil strips may show at least one or more perforation row out of alignment as the cause. However, closer examination and research is on going on this.

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Edited by jogil - 07/06/2021 08:38 am
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Posted 07/06/2021   09:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Jogil
So this is pre 1930 perforation...???
Robert

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Posted 07/06/2021   11:10 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
wert: No, the straight corresponding coil perforations are mostly from 1930 onwards.
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Edited by jogil - 07/06/2021 12:00 pm
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Posted 07/08/2021   09:15 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The stamps below are Canada Scott 238 strip of 4 coil stamps and 10 blank coil end tabs.

The perforations on the stamps are across from each other and gauge around 7.85 (Kiusalas 8-100=7.87) from a bar perforator and the perforations on the blank tabs are not all across from each other and gauge around 7.95 (Kiusalas 8-99=7.95) from a wheel perforator.

What has been found are some Canada Scott 239 and 240 coil stamps that have the perforations of the coil tabs (Kiusalas 8-99=7.95). The gum is horizontally streaked as found so far on this variety so that their years may be 1937 to 1939 mostly.



Also see:

http://goscf.com/t/47942

http://goscf.com/t/47973
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Edited by jogil - 07/09/2021 08:08 am
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Posted 07/13/2021   08:06 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Did this occurrence lead to a return to pasteups temporarily for some 239 and 240 coil stamps?

If both (or one) of the stamps in between a pasteup were of the irregular perforation variety, then this would be a sheet strip pasteup.

If both of the stamps in between a pasteup were of the regular perforation variety, then this would still be a regular repair pasteup.

The bar perforator, web perforated 10 stamps across so that the 250 (25 x 10) plate 1 layout worked with 10 across.
For the 425 (25 x 17) plate 2 layout, the 17 across would have to be divided maybe into 10 and 7 across or 9 and 8 across.

The wheel perforator, sheet perforated 20 stamps across but there was also a perforator for 30 stamps across that could work for the 25 across but it would mean that some parts of the web were cut into sheets. Maybe some of this was done to salvage some damaged parts of the printed web.

May be they temporarily tried to combine the two different printing plates together.
(10 combination rotations needed for 10 regular coil rolls of 500 stamps to be printed.)
(20 combination rotations needed for 7 irregular coil rolls of 500 stamps to be printed.)
This would result in 50 x 10 printed part for the bar perforator from each combination rotation.
This would result in 25 x 7 printed part for the wheel perforator from each combination rotation.
This would result in 25 x 7 blank tab part for the wheel perforator from each combination rotation.

There may also be the possibility that some regular sheet stamps were made into some early coil stamps. More is being looked into this.
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Edited by jogil - 07/13/2021 08:49 am
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Posted 07/20/2021   09:20 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
See pages 270 to 272 in the following: https://www.rpsc.org/tcp/cpresults....&vloc=Search
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Posted 07/20/2021   09:47 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Great write up Jogil...I am impressed..

Robert
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