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Help Requested For Translation Of Some Japanese Markings

 
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Posted 07/11/2021   3:42 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add mml1942 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
At a postal history get-together this weekend, one collector brought several US wrappers used to Japan, which had some Japanese markings he could not understand. I offered to post these here in the hopes that someone could help.

These date from the 1890s.

Wrapper#1 - two markings:



To simply the reply, refer to these as:

Marking#1



And Marking#2



And now for the Wrapper#2



And the marking:



All help greatly appreciated.

Mike
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Posted 07/11/2021   8:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hy-brasil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the excellent images!

On the first wrapper, the cancel is a receiving mark, from Matsuyama, as expected (two characters above the line). It is dated April 10, Meiji 32 (1899).

The brush script also reads Matsuyama. During this time, there was not a lot of familiarity with English, so the final address was translated into Japanese, typically done at whatever major port's PO it arrived at. You will find incoming foreign mail of the time with tissue strips attached giving exact translated addresses, with the strips sometimes removed later. Here, I assume because there was no specific address, Matsuyama was just written directly.

The brushed characters are written vertically and run left to right on the cover. This is (probably) written in one of the formal styles that looks like scribbles. I can only suss this one out because it should indeed read "Matsuyama".

I like the use of two wrappers to make the rate.

The second wrapper has a Tokyo receiving cancel. It is dated June 2, Meiji 38 (1895). The "20" character isn't well struck, but the wrapper was issued in 1895, so 1895 makes sense.
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Edited by hy-brasil - 07/11/2021 8:25 pm
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Posted 07/11/2021   8:29 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Nice work HB !

Quote:
You will find incoming foreign mail of the time with tissue strips attached giving exact addresses, sometimes removed later.

Fascinating.
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Posted 07/11/2021   9:46 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mml1942 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
hy-brasil:

Thank you so very much.

I will pass along your explanations. This will help him update the exhibit pages.

Mike
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Japan
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Posted 07/11/2021   10:20 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add unechan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I am not familiar with western hand scripts, but the receiver of the first wrapper to Matusyama could be Rev. Sidney Lewis Gulick.

http://www.meiji-portraits.de/meiji...3_1_2_3_67_1

Here, it says;

"In 1893 he was transferred to Osaka and in 1897 to Matsuyama. He turned to Kyoto in 1904 and taught theology at Doshisha, later he taught comparative religion at the Kyoto Imperial University and afterwards at the Osaka Girls School until 1913 when he returned to the USA. "

which does match the delivery date of this wrapper in Matsuyama.


- Hironobu
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Edited by unechan - 07/11/2021 10:30 pm
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Posted 07/12/2021   04:04 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hy-brasil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
unechan, great research! I'm confident the addressee is indeed Rev. S.L. Gulick.

Mike, if your friend would like to show more such wrappers, we'd enjoy seeing them.
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Edited by hy-brasil - 07/12/2021 04:08 am
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Posted 07/12/2021   4:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I thought some of you might like to see what hy-brasil was talking about. From my WW postal history collection, here is an example of tissue strips, a philatelic term not used often. This postal card has 3 layers of tissue strips piled on top of each other:

Linus

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Posted 07/12/2021   6:39 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add unechan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Linus, interesting usage indeed !

I thinks that at lease some of the tissue strips are for indicating the transfer of the postal card to forwarding post office due to the absence of the addressee. You can notice the blue handwriting in the left (saying "ATTN. Mr FUHISHIA" ) was stroke out and rewritten in black pencil to be "ATTN Mr HELM". The last two character on top stips could be also read as "Mawashi", meaning to forward or transfer this item.

I do love these "busy" postcards and letters, so I appreciate if you can post the scans of the postcard itself and the remaining tissue strips.

P.S. The datestamp is also nice; it bears two variations of trisected circle type datestamp; delivery time zone shown in fractions (one on the left, showing "8 3/6") and in decimals (on the strips).

- Hironobu
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Posted 07/12/2021   10:14 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
mml1942 - My apologies. My original intent was not to hijack your thread, but perhaps you will find this interesting.

unechan - Sorry for the slow reply. My vegetable crop is ready now, the hours are long, and the work is physical. I have some time now for a response to your post.

Here are five pictures of my "busy" Japanese postal card as follows:

Message side of card.
Address side with tissue strips lifted.
First tissue strip.
Second tissue strip.
Third tissue strip.

















hy-brasil - I hope you also like this item from my collection.

Thanks for this nice thread, everyone, I enjoyed the covers in the OP.

Linus
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Posted 07/13/2021   12:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add unechan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Linus, thanks for the additional images. the first tissue strip is what hy-brasil has mentioned to Mike's question; the address and addressee written in Japanese. The second and third strips are for forwarding and transferring the postcard amongst the post offices.

Mike > my apologies for going off-topic from your original postů I hope this sort of analysis be of interest to you and your colleagues !

- Hironobu
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Edited by unechan - 07/13/2021 09:10 am
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Posted 07/13/2021   01:44 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
One quick question...what English year is this cancel on my card?

Linus


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Posted 07/13/2021   02:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hy-brasil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Year is the first number, so Meiji 35, May 13, so 1902. Tokyo cancel (at top), I believe a local office name below that, perhaps Nishi-something.

Thank you, Linus, for your contribution to the postal history tale here. Like rod and others, you always have interesting things to show us.

EDIT:
Basically, the card was moving around among clerks and/or offices in Tokyo from the 10th. The addressee's name is transliterated at different points as "beri", "be-ri" and "peri", so that might have been the problem.

The cancel types are unique to 7 or so major cities and were only used for a few years before being replaced by the familiar comb/bridge/German-style cancels.

The bottom part is the time marking in ten minute intervals. Did they really waste time changing their cancels every time? Anyway, the character in that bottom section on the last/top tissue is "go" meaning AM. The second tissue shows the character "zen" meaning PM.
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Edited by hy-brasil - 07/13/2021 03:09 am
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Posted 07/13/2021   10:19 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thank you for that. 1902, I will make some notes along with my card.

The sharing of knowledge by everyone on this forum is greatly appreciated.

Linus
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Posted 07/13/2021   10:24 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add unechan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Linus, hy-brasil and Mike,

Apologies again for going too far off-topic, but I just couldn't resist my interest in Linus's postal card; here's my best effort to decipher the hand written addressee information and identification of the persons appearing in the address and message. It's a pity that I couldn't identify the addressee, Mr. M. G. Baily (Bailey?) though.

As hy-brasil wrote:


Quote:
Basically, the card was moving around among clerks and/or offices in Tokyo from the 10th. The addressee's name is transliterated at different points as "beri", "be-ri" and "peri", so that might have been the problem.


you can see how the postal clerks were trying their best to transliterate the addressee's name.

Linus, thanks again for this beautiful piece of memories from Meiji.







- Hironobu
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Edited by unechan - 07/13/2021 10:26 am
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Posted 07/13/2021   11:05 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Linus to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hironobu - Wow! That is amazing research, thank you so much! I will save this information. I am really impressed with your skills and knowledge. A lot of information, coming from one little post card, thank you!

Linus
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Posted 07/13/2021   2:40 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mml1942 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have started a new thread with some pages from the Exhibit of U.S. wrappers which were shown in the original post. See At:

Pages from an Exhibit of US Wrapper Scott No. W301

http://goscf.com/t/77973

Mike
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