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Watermark On Stamped Envelop

 
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Author Previous TopicReplies: 6 / Views: 327Next Topic  
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Posted 09/06/2021   5:56 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add hac5x3 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
Can anyone tell me if this is a watermark or just a manufacturers identification? In either case, the significance of such a mark? I assume the 94 is for 1894, and POD is paid on demand? Thanking in you advance for any information.

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Posted 09/06/2021   6:13 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Watermark
US and POD = United States Post Office Department

Background appears to be Harlequin diamond hatching.
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Edited by rod222 - 09/06/2021 6:17 pm
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Posted 09/06/2021   8:36 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ThomasGalloway to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You have an envelope with Watermark #12 in the paper (see UPSS 19th century catalog or Scott Specialized, stamped envelopes section front matter).

U.S. Stamped Envelopes were (are) made under contract by an envelope contractor, whose contract was re-bid approximately every 4 years.

Each 4-year contract got its own watermark.

Your envelope was made during the period commonly known as "Plimpton Morgan/Purcell (1894-1898)", which is actually two contractors, due to some contract bidding shenanigans.

"POD" = Post Office Department"
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Posted 09/06/2021   8:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ThomasGalloway to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The "diamond hatching" is a result of looking through two back-lit pieces of paper from your envelope (front and back).
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Posted 09/06/2021   9:03 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hac5x3 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Greatly appreciated all. Thanks.
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Posted 09/06/2021   11:55 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
The "diamond hatching" is a result of looking through two back-lit pieces of paper from your envelope (front and back).


Ah! yes, thanks Thomas,
I can now see, and recognise the laid paper.

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Posted 09/07/2021   05:49 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The House of Plimpton

The envelope manufacturing industry in Hartford, Connecticut,
owes its beginnings to William H. Prescott. The firm of Prescott,
Plimpton & Company was founded in 1865 by William H.Prescott and Linus B. Plimpton.

Mr. Prescott was associated with White & Corbin of Rockville,
Connecticut. Mr. Plimpton was a dry goods salesman for P.R. Moore
in Rockville, Connecticut. The firm began doing businessin the upper lofts of the Howard
Building on Asylum Street in Hartford and had been operating
a year when Mr. Prescott returned to the firm of White & Corbin in Rockville. Prescott sold his interest in the Hartford venture to Mr. Plimpton.

With the departure of Prescott, Mr. Plimpton began the process of reorganizing the company under the firm name of L.B. Plimpton & Company, later changed to Plimpton Envelope & Paper Company, and still later the company was incorporated as Plimpton Manufacturing Company in 1872.

In 1868, the business moved from the Howard
Building to a building on Ford Street. In January 1877, a fire destroyed the Ford Street plant and what was salvaged from the fire was taken to the Batterson Building on Asylum Street. The firm continued to do business there until 1887, when the business, having outgrown this plant, moved to the building at 256
Pearl Street, where it remained until 1921.

They then moved the factory to South Ann Street and the corner of Jewell Street, which was formerly the home of
the Hartford Manufacturing Company, where the company made government stamped envelopes for many years.

Author: Maynard H Benjamin.
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Edited by rod222 - 09/07/2021 05:51 am
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