Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Éire - Ireland 1922 Irish Symbols Definitives

Previous Page | Next Page    
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 44 / Views: 1,394Next Topic
Page: of 3
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/10/2021   11:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
1934 Stamp affixing machine rolls watermark

Update: The 2020 Hibernian Handbook and Catalogue of the Postage Stamps of Ireland dates the issue of the 2d "Map of Ireland" stamp imperforate top and bottom to September 1934. The 2009 edition dated the issue to November 1934.

The stamp rolls printed for use by businesses in stamp-affixing machines were printed sideways. They were imperforate top and bottom and had vertical perforation gauge 14. The watermark was sideways with the top of the "e" pointing to the left as seen from the front of the stamp. The Hibernian Handbook calls these "sideways right" as seen from the back of the stamp. It, however, does not mention the stamps have a sideways watermark.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by NSK - 10/10/2021 5:12 pm
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/23/2021   2:56 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Having had more time to read my new 2020 Hibernian handbook, I did find the note on the sideways watermarks of the stamps from rolls intended for stamp affixing machines. After the listing of the stamps, for each of the two stamps, the Handbook notes "watermark sideways is normal."
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/23/2021   2:56 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
1931 Booklet stamps with inverted watermarks

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/23/2021   3:01 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Inverted printing of booklet stamps

On 21 August 1931, the Irish Free State issued its first stamp book. The stamp book cost 2/- and contained four stamp panes. These were one each of 6 stamps of the 1/2d (Sword of Light), 1d, and 2d (Map of Ireland) stamps, and one pane of three 1d stamps over three advertising labels. The panes had two rows of three labels each with a binding margin to the left of the stamps. The advertising labels in the pane of three 1d stamps read "Get Telephone," "Buy Savings Certificates," and "Learn Irish," respectively. The panes were stitched together with cardboard covers.

The panes were printed in sheets of 44 panes of six labels. Each sheet consisted of four columns of 11 panes with a vertical gutter margin between columns 1 and 2, and columns 3 and 4. The panes of stamps in the first and third columns were printed inverted. Consequently, these stamps had the watermark inverted in relation to the design. The binding margin of each pane represents half of the vertical gutter margin between these columns. Once turned the right way up, all panes had this binding margin to the left of the stamps.



Another source for stamps with inverted watermark were those from printers' sheets fed upside down into the printing press. Generally, stamps from stamp books have the perforation tips on at least one side of the stamp cut straight.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/24/2021   3:41 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
High value stamps




Ireland did not issue its own high value stamps until 8 September 1937. It continued using overprinted high-value British stamps, the so-called Seahorses, until that date. The re-engraved Seahorses that had been put into circulation in October 1934 were the last to be overprinted for use in the Irish Free State.



Saint Patrick and the paschal fire

A single design by Richard Joseph King (Rísteard Ó Cíonga), a stained-glass artist, was adopted for the first Irish high-value stamps. The stamp depicted Saint Patrick, Ireland's patron saint, lighting the paschal fire on the Hill of Slane (Dumha Sláine). The style of the design is Art Deco.

In the Irish pagan tradition, the High King of Ireland would light a ceremonial fire at Tara. The ceremony coincided with the eve of Easter. From the fire at Tara all fires in Ireland would be lit. The law forbad the lighting of a fire when this ceremonial fire was burning. On one such eve, Saint Patrick lighted a fire on the nearby Hill of Slane.

When King Laeghaire saw the fire, he summoned his druids. They prophesied that if the fire would not be extinguished that night, it will over-top all their fires, and that he who had lit it would overturn the Kingdom. The King, accompanied by some of his courtiers rode to the Hill of Slane. One of the courtiers was converted by the saint. Saint Patrick himself was directed to appear the next day at Tara and give account of his proceedings before the assembled court. There, he explained the Christian doctrine to the court and silenced the druids. Although King Laeghaire was not converted, he permitted Patrick and his missionaries to preach their doctrines throughout his dominions.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by NSK - 10/24/2021 5:45 pm
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
7145 Posts
Posted 10/24/2021   6:17 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Love the presentation NSK. Very inspirational.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   05:04 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks rogdcam.

Still more to come.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   05:04 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
1937 Saint Patrick lighting the paschal fire on the Hill of Slane

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   10:09 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
1937 Saint Patrick high values watermark

The high value stamps had the multiple "se" watermark upright.



All three are known with inverted watermark.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   10:26 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
From Saorstát Éireann to Éire

On 21 January 1919, a gathering of Irish members elected to the British parliament established the Dáil Éireann. This adopted the Forógra na Saoirse (Proclamation of Freedom) that ratified the Forógra na Poblachta (Proclamation of the Republic) of 1916. The Anglo-Irish Treaty established the Irish Free State as a dominion of the British Commonwealth of Nations. By signing the treaty, effectively, the Irish government abolished the revolutionary Irish Republic declared in 1919. The official head of state remained the British King.

Amendments to the Irish constitution drafted in 1922 removed the Oath of Allegiance to the British King and appeals to British institutions. Nonetheless, the Irish government formed by the Fianna Fáil party led by Éamon de Valera drafted a new constitution. The proposed Irish constitution (Bunreacht na hÉireann) was put to a plebiscite on 1 July 1937. 56 percent of the voters, making up 36.8 percent of the electorate were in favour of the new constitution.

The new constitution re-established the Irish Republic position of an elected President of Éire (Uachtarán na hÉireann), and calling named the state Éire. It came into force on 29 December 1937. This was commemorated by the two stamps issued on the same day.



The new name of the RepublicÉire, also, would be reflected in the watermark of Irish stamps. From 1940, stamps were printed on paper with the multiple Gaelic e of Éire watermark that replaced the multiple Gaelic "se" of the Saorstát Éireann. "Symbols of Ireland" definitive stamps printed on paper with the new watermark, gradually, replaced those on the old watermark.

Both above stamps commemorating the 1937 constitution and the high value stamps, issued after the plebiscite of 1 July 1937, were printed on paper with the multiple "se" watermark of the Irish Free State.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by NSK - 10/26/2021 04:25 am
Pillar Of The Community
United Kingdom
5977 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   11:02 am  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
NSK - I think that the oath remained after 1922. After de Valera split from Sinn Fein and founded Fianna Fail, his members entered the Dail by "affirming". In terms of the Republic, this wasn't established in 1937, but in 1948 by a coalition government including Sean MacBride, son of Maud Gonne and John MacBride, former IRA chief of staff and future founder of Amnesty International.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   1:14 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Geoff, You are correct.

I was afraid it would not be completely clear. The Oath of Allegiance was part of the 1922 constitution. There were amendments to that constitution. By 1937, references to the oath had been removed from the constitution of 1922. So, it was not removed in 1922, but from the 1922 constitution, in the 1930s.

As for establishing of the Republic. On 21 December 1948, the Oireachtas signed the Republic of Ireland Act 1948 into law. This came into law on Easter Monday, 18 April 1949. It transferred all remaining powers vested in the British Monarch to the President of Ireland. The Ireland Act of 1949 confirmed this. In that sense, Ireland was not recognised as a republic until 1949.

From another of my pages:



The 1937 constitution, however, established the position of (an elected) Uachtarán na hÉireann (President of Eire), effectively creating a republic. I updated my text above to be more precise.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by NSK - 10/25/2021 1:38 pm
Pillar Of The Community
United Kingdom
5977 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   1:35 pm  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
That's a relief - I spent a lot of time on Irish history, but the best part of fifty years ago! This continues to be an excellent thread - thank you.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
1125 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   1:52 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I visited Luimneach, Gaillimh, and Cill Channaigh a few years ago. I, have also visited England many times.

As for those last 50 years: it has changed a lot. Marks and Spencer stores, Dunnes selling HP sauce, Rose's marmelades, Typhoo tea, and all that is British. Hotels and airports with carpeted corridors. Bacon, eggs, sausage, toast and marmelade, and hot breakfast tea with a dash of milk for breakfast. People starting most sentences with 'excuse me.' Routemaster buses. People driving on the lefthand side. Good fish and chips.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United Kingdom
5977 Posts
Posted 10/25/2021   5:35 pm  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
In the way of the modern world, HP sauce is now made in Elst, of course! Still the required accompaniment to bacon sandwiches and pork pies, however.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Page: of 3 Previous TopicReplies: 44 / Views: 1,394Next Topic  
Previous Page | Next Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2021 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2021 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.22 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05