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Éire - Ireland 1922 Irish Symbols Definitives

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Posted 10/26/2021   05:09 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
1940 – 1949 Éire watermark

During 1940, most stamps from the series appeared printed on paper with the multiple "e" watermark. The 2 1/2d stamp did not appear on this paper until March 1941. The 6d stamp was the last to appear on paper with this watermark, a year later. In 1967, a re-printed 6d stamp on chalk-surfaced paper was released. It is interesting to note that the Hibernian handbook lists the stamp but does not provide information on when it was issued.

On 12 September 1949, the 8d and 11d values complemented the existing range. By this time, the ½ d and 1/- values had been replaced by the two stamps commemorating the 300th. anniversary of the death of Mícheál Ó Cléirigh.

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Posted 10/26/2021   10:19 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Watermark

The multiple "e" watermark is easily visible against a dark background on most stamps other than the 6d.

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Posted 10/26/2021   4:14 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
6d ordinary and chalk-surfaced papers

The 6d stamps with multiple "e" watermark was re-printed on chalk-surfaced paper. This paper is markedly whiter than the creamy ordinary paper, This, especially, is visible in the centre of the mandorla. The impression of the stamp on chalk-surfaced paper is much finer. The shading is cleaner than that of the stamp on ordinary paper. This is best visible in the shading of the mandorla and the lower right corner. At the lower end of the zoomorphic ornament to the right of the mandorla, the topmost lines of shading in this area are better defined on the chalk-surfaced paper.

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Posted 10/27/2021   5:09 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Commemorative definitives

A month after the British government declared war on Germany, the Bráithreachas Phoblacht na hÉireann (Irish Republican Brotherhood) decided to stage an uprising before the end of the war. They sought help from Germany for this rising. On Easter Monday, 24 April 1916, the rising began. On Saturday 29 April 1916, the rebels surrendered unconditionally to avoid further loss of civilian life.

The leaders of the insurrection were tried before courts martial and executed. This and the British reaction to the insurrection increased popular support for Irish independence.

The 25th. anniversary of the 1916 Easter Rising was commemorated with a stamp issue. On 12 April 1941, the eve of Easter, a provisional set of two stamps was issued. The definitive stamp was issued on 27 October 1941. This stamp shows an insurgent in front of the General Post Office the insurgents used as their headquarters.

The provisional issue comprised a 2d "Map of Ireland" and a 3d "Cros Chonga" stamp. The designs were those of the contemporary definitives series. Both stamps were overprinted "1941 I gcuimne Aiséirge 1916" (In memory of the Rising 1916) in three lines. The 2d stamp was printed in orange, a colour not used for the definitives series. It had a green overprint. The 3d stamp was printed in blue, the same colour as the stamp from the definitives series. It had a violet overprint.



Other than the colour of the 2d stamp and the overprint, both stamps are like their definitive counterparts. These were the first commemorative stamps printed on the multiple "e" watermarked paper.

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Posted 10/27/2021   5:14 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Are there any inverted 1941 overprints or other varieties known?
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Posted 10/27/2021   5:21 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The varieties and errors section of the 2020 Hibernian handbook does not list inverted overprints. It does list a few varieties in the overprints, especially the "e" becoming a "c," the length of the "1," and similar.
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Edited by NSK - 10/27/2021 5:22 pm
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Posted 10/29/2021   07:13 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Definitive commemoratives

On 30 June 1944, two stamps were issued to commemorate the tercentenary of the death of brother Mícheál Ó Cléirigh, co-author of the Annals of the Four Masters. The stamps, originally, were issued as commemoratives. After issuance, they became part of the definitives series, replacing the 1/2d and 1 s "Sword of Light" stamps. They remained in use until superseded by the Gerl definitives, in 1969.



Mícheál Ó Cléirigh
The stamps depict Ó Cléirigh at his desk enclosed by the "e" of Eire in the style of illuminated miniatures. The manuscript which he is writing is titled "Annala." The caption in Irish Gaelic "Do chum glóire Dé agus onóra na hÉireann" means To the Glory of God and the Honor of Ireland.


Mícheál Ó Cléirigh was born and educated in Ireland. He studied Irish history and literature before he entered the Franciscan Irish College of Saint Anthony in Louvain (currently in Belgium). Together with fellow scholars, brother Mícheál Ó Cléirigh returned to Ireland to collect and transcribe Irish manuscripts. In 1632, they began to assemble a set of Irish annals. The Annals are a chronicle of Irish history from A.M. 2242 (Great Flood) to A.D. 1616 and contain records under successive years of the deaths of kings and other prominent persons, both ecclesiastical and lay, along with accounts of battles, plagues, etc. They end with the death of Hugh O'Neill, earl of Tyrone, in 1616.

The work took four years to compile and was known as Annála Ríoghachta Éireann (Annals of the Kingdom of Ireland), or Annals of the Four Masters. The four masters refer to four of the scholars, including brother Mícheál Ó Cléirigh. Among his further works is a glossary that was printed during his lifetime, in 1643. Mícheál Ó Cléirigh returned to Louvain, where he died around 1643.



The stamps have the watermark sideways: seen from the front, the "e" reads from top to bottom with the top pointing to the right. In 1946, booklets were issued with panes of six of the 1/2d stamps from this issue. These had the watermark both sideways and sideways inverted (the "e" reads from bottom to top with the top pointing to the left) in the normal course of printing).


I am not 100 percent sure the left stamp has the sideways watermark

Both stamps exist with sideways inverted watermark from counter sheets. The 1 s stamp with sideways inverted watermark, only, originates from counter sheets.

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Posted 10/29/2021   07:28 am  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
This reminds me that, for many years, I thought this stamp depicted a man playing the organ!
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Posted 10/30/2021   03:16 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Coil stamps

Rolls of the 1d "Map of Ireland" stamps from continuous reels for use in vending machines with vertical delivery with multiple "e" watermark became available from 29 April 1940. This was almost six months before the 1d stamp from sheets became available.

Like the coil stamps with the multiple "se" watermark issued in 1934, these had imperforate vertical sides. The horizontal perforation gauge, however, was 14. The reason for using this new gauge is unknown. One possible explanation is that the machine used for production of the 1/2d and 2d rolls with multiple "se" watermark with horizontal feed was used with the spacing between rows changed.



In 1946, at least two further printings of the coil were made. These had imperforate vertical edges and horizontal perforation gauge 15. The first printing had the watermark upright, the second had the watermark inverted. Stamps from this second printing have a slightly brighter shade.



Watermarks

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Posted 10/30/2021   03:21 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
1940 - 1946 Coil stamps

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Posted 10/30/2021   10:52 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
1940 – 1960 Booklet stamps

Up to 1964, two small numbers separated by a dash appear on the cover of Irish stamp books. These represented the last two digits of the year of issue and a serial number. In 1938, the order was changed. The 2/- stamp book 22-40, issued in 1940, exists in two versions. One version has all panes with the multiple "se" watermark. A large part of this edition, however, has the pane of three 1d "Map of Ireland" stamps and three advertising labels with the multiple "e" watermark. From edition 23-40 onwards, all panes had the multiple "e" watermark. As before, the panes were printed in columns with alternating directions of printing. The booklet stamps, therefore, exist both with upright and inverted watermark.

From edition 29-46, panes of six 1/2d "Mícheál Ó Cléirigh" stamps substituted for panes of six 1/2d "Sword of Light" stamps. In 1948, the price of the stamp book was increased from 2/- to 2/6. The content changed to a pane of six 1/2d, two panes of six 1d, and a pane of six 2 1/2d "Arms of the Provinces" stamps. The first edition of this stamp book was 31-48.

The price of a stamp book increased from 2/6 to 4/- with edition 37-54 issued on 24 November 1954. Stamp book 37-54 contained a pane of six 1/2d, a pane of six 1 1/2d "Map of Ireland," and two panes of six 3d "Celtic Cross" stamps. Subsequent booklets had different contents. On 23 October 1962, the price of a stamp book changed to 3/-. Edition 43-62 contained one pane each of six 2d and six 4d "Arms of the Provinces" stamps.

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Edited by NSK - 10/30/2021 2:32 pm
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Posted 10/30/2021   2:32 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add NSK to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Inverted watermarks

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