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Heavily Hinged Mint Stamps

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Posted 10/15/2021   8:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add dbuss to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
I recently purchased an older Germany stamp collection. Most of the stamps are canceled and hinged. I am cleaning these up by soaking off the hinges and envelope remnants. However, the inflation era stamps from the 1920s are mostly mint and heavily hinged. Their value is not high but is there an easy way to remove the hinges without too much difficulty? I have stamp lift fluid that I can use. Any other suggestions, including leave them as is?
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Posted 10/15/2021   8:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Opinion:
Use only cool water when soaking.
Leave paper remnants on if there is a readable postmark.
Never soak early Netherlands Indies.
Purple and Magenta stamps, ink can run, (fugitive ink) be wary.
Never soak stamps on coloured envelopes
Never leave stamps soaking when on yellow manila paper.

If pressing in a book, place damp stamps face down on freezer bag
(prevents adhesion from gum remainders)
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Edited by rod222 - 10/15/2021 9:18 pm
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Posted 10/15/2021   9:31 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add bookbndrbob to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Most of the mint hinged inflation issues of Germany are of minimum value, especially if they are heavily hinged. If there are some in this collection that you didn't previously have, you could mount them in your collection until you get better copies.

If the stamps are deformed by the heavy hinging…that is a different story.
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Posted 10/15/2021   10:05 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add canyoneer to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have often wondered about this myself. There is something referred to as a "sweat box". Apparently you place the mint stamp in a high humidity environment (box with sponge in it) and it allows the hinge to be removed while leaving the gum (of course it is disturbed gum at this point but it is still there). Never done this myself - is there anyone on the forum with experience in this? Here is some text and picture from another stamp chat site I found detailing this.


Quote:
Use of a sweat box, if successful, would leave your mint stamps mint with disturbed gum.

Take an air tight container, slightly larger than the pieces your need to sweat. Place a damp (not wet) sponge(s) in the bottom. Place some sort of raised shelf (some kind of perforated or baffled plastic works best) to keep the items being sweated from direct contact with the sponge. Put item(s) into sweat box, attach cover. Wait patiently, test gently for separation. Warning! Do not force the stamps from the stock sheet or other stamps.

There is a commercial version of the sweat box called STAMPLIFT brand stamp remover. Interior will accomodate 125 mm X 72 mm





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Posted 10/16/2021   01:58 am  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You could try Bill Weiss's pressure method

https://stampsmarter.org/learning/H...eHinges.html
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Posted 10/16/2021   08:33 am  Show Profile Check eyeonwall's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add eyeonwall to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
It depends on what type of hinges they are. Some peel off easily. Some can be coaxed of with a little rubbing. If they can only be remove with some liquid and they are cheap common stamps, is it really worth your time?
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Posted 10/16/2021   09:04 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jconey to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
No matter what you method you use, it's going to leave a mark. The problem with soaking is that it'll take all the gum off.

canyoneer: I use a stamp lift and a home made sweat box for larger items. The one thing you'll want to be aware of before using it is that it while does leave the gum intact, it also changes the gum's appearance. So, it may/will have an effect on value. I consider them altered or disturbed gum.
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Edited by jconey - 10/16/2021 8:21 pm
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Posted 10/16/2021   5:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add mootermutt987 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
As has been said, no matter what you do you will disturb the gum if they were heavily hinged. I use a different method. I bought the smallest paintbrush that I could find. I use my own spit. Put the brush in your mouth and wet it, then brush on top of the hinge remnant - this will take a while. DON'T go off the hinge, but DO cover the entire surface of the hinge. After the spit has soaked through the hinge, carefully start to peel it up using a pair of tongs. With practice, you will get the whole thing off in one try. I learned this years ago from a dealer that I worked with and he said the spit has enzymes in it that makes the job go faster. It takes practice to get the timing right and the amount of 'wetness', too. It is surprising how little wetness it takes - too much spit just makes a mess, so be careful. My tongs are the sharp pointy kind - they work best for me, especially with this task. I also find that once the spit is penetrating the hinge that rubbing the hinge with the brush, hard (well, harder than brushing on spit - remember these things are only made of paper), helps to loosen the glue, too. I give the back of the stamp a few seconds to dry, then carefully rub the hinge mark with a soft pencil eraser - it takes some of the shine off the hingemark, which I think doesn't look very good. With practice, it will look like a hinge has been peeled off - I won't say it looks lightly hinged, but it doesn't look like it's undergone major surgery, either. Practice. Practice. Practice.

I have used other methods. This is what I prefer to do.

Of course, soak the whole she-bang if they are used or no gum.
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Edited by mootermutt987 - 10/16/2021 5:29 pm
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Posted 10/16/2021   5:34 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
I use my own spit.


I have to start wearing gloves when I handle previously hinged stamps.
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Posted 10/16/2021   5:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add TheArtfulHinger to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Most unused German inflation issues are more or less worthless when hinged, so any method you choose isn't really going to affect the value. Honestly, if they're heavily hinged to the point where it bothers you, and you prefer them with gum, you might want to just replace them with NH stamps. NH sets of inflation issues are readily available and pretty affordable.

You're probably already aware that most inflation issues are worth far more in used condition, but be very wary of any used inflation issues that aren't expertized; fake cancels probably outnumber genuine ones, especially on the more expensive used issues.
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Posted 10/16/2021   7:49 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dudley to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
When necessary I use mootermutt's method (but with a dish of fresh water). In the past I was able to use Stamplift successfully but, as has been said, the gum is altered.
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Posted 10/16/2021   8:51 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add bookbndrbob to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
To be blunt about it, trying to improve German inflation issues by removing hinge remnants wouldn't be something I would recommend to any stamp collector.
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Posted 10/16/2021   10:15 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add dbuss to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Canyoneer,
Thanks for the tip about StampLift. It reminded me that I have such a box as it was given to me about 25 years ago by a stamp collecting friend. It does the job well. When I said heavily hinged several of these so-called mint inflation issues had double or triple hinges on them. Removing the hinges also revealed other faults for a few of them.

I have no interest in passing them off as having undisturbed gum as their value is limited. I regard these as merely page fillers for my pre WW II Germany collection.
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Posted 10/17/2021   06:05 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jbcev80 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi

I soak very few stamps. However, when I do soak, I use a plastic shoe box that one can buy. I punched a few holes near the top rim. I then fill it with water until the water starts running out of the holes. I put the stamps to soak in and let a little water run into the box. A lot of "crud" goes out the holes and down the drain. Paper remnants tend to go to the sides due to the holes and running water.

Jerry B
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Posted 10/17/2021   7:17 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Noocassel to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
When I have been removing GB stamps with fugitive inks from paper I use a wad of wet kitchen towel and put the stamp on it, envelope remains next to the paper. I to remove think it would work equally well to remove a hinge remnant. The gum would obviously be disturbed. I have removed the envelope and managed to leave the star and letter underprints that are on the back of some GB stamps, sometimes the underprint has been damaged slightly but about half the time it survives the procedure.
On the subject of full original gum, how many people actually look at the back of their stamps once they are in the album?
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Posted 10/26/2021   1:07 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Rob Roy to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
From a scientific point of view, the stamp gum and the hinge gum are different, so if we know what type of gums they are, we can look for a solvent that will readily dissolve the hinge gum, while doing minimal damage to the stamp gum. Water, or spit, are likely to affect both gums.
Alas, I have no knowledge of those gum types, so I can't speculate about the right solvent.
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