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Optimal Album Presentation For Buyers Of Collections?

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Posted 11/25/2021   09:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add BFRomeos to your friends list Get a Link to this Message



From your perspective as a buyer of stamp collections, how useful is the album maintenance tactic described below?

Most of you will recognize the Minkus All-American album in the photo. This houses my used U.S. collection. Select pages have the left margin trimmed off and each was subsequently slipped into a clear, top-loading, acid-free page protector sleeve. The sleeves are then received in the two-post binder. This protects the stamps from damage incurred by my frequent flipping through the pages. The sleeves are also a convenient repository for certification documents.

The down side of this mechanism is the extra time it would add to the future evaluator's task. Since "time is money," could this approach have a detrimental effect on valuation?

Comments, please...
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Posted 11/25/2021   09:45 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add floortrader to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You want a real opinion ---------Ask the guys here who have spend many year ......and I mean many years ,like 50 years throwing out albums like this into the garbage . Stuff like you show come up for auction every month . These buyers give absolutely nothing for the album meaning the binder, nice printed pages and protective plastic . All that most likely ends in the trash and the stamps removed .

The buyer is not into keeping these old binders and don't put a dollar value into the value of such . I can honestly say I must cut up 5 or 10 albums a year and that is for the past 45 years . Clear plastic protective page savers ,I must have a box half full of them . Pages of all kinds of albums are cut up and thrown into mixture boxes ,while binders are trashed

Sorry but this is the real world ........Look at the next Kelleher Stamp Auction you can buy 20 to 40 albums in one lot and they have a few lots like this . Most will be ripped apart .
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Posted 11/25/2021   09:48 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add BFRomeos to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
@floortrader: Very well. Then please describe the optimal presentation - THAT would be useful to many readers.
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Posted 11/25/2021   10:01 am  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
From a conservation stand point sheet protectors can be a double edge sword.

IF the environmental conditions are kept stable page protectors will indeed keep the pages and stamps protected, especially from mechanical 'wear and tear'. In this way they are good.

But if the environmental conditions are not stable (i.e. occasional high relative humidity over 60%), the sheet can trap moisture and increase the probability of acidification. Note that the sheet protectors being 'acid free' have nothing to do with this. Acids can be formed from the page paper (i.e. lignin's), the stamp paper, or the atmosphere (i.e. CO2) itself (think acid rain). You would be hard pressed to find an archival library or museum that uses sheet protectors.

But on the whole, as long as you are careful about storing this album in controlled environment you solution should be safe. The ideal stable environment would be a constant 70F with a relative humidity held between 30% and 50%.

So as a buyer and when I see sheet protectors, I look carefully to see if acidification, foxing, or mildew is present. For myself, I removed them all from anything that I keep and pass them along to others who use them. I do not pay more for albums that have them.
Don
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Posted 11/25/2021   10:02 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add floortrader to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Sure BFROMEOS ------- I have posted over 200 pages from my collection , each page cost me 4 cents or less , over the past year on this website . How you or me display our stuff is a personal choice .
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Posted 11/25/2021   10:04 am  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I've bought a few albums with leaves housed like this iver the years, and I've always thrown away the plastic covers - or used them for some non-philatelic purpose. I suspect that a valuer's patience would be strained if he had to remove dozens of these to get at any potentially good stuff in the collection. The "optimum presentation" for someone other than the original collector is always going to be neatly and coherently laid out albums or stock-books/pages with the stamps readily accessible.
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Posted 11/25/2021   11:38 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gmot to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I break down a fair number of collections on album pages, and sheet protectors add to the time it takes to do so, but not significantly. So a non-factor there. I too have a large stack of protectors in the spare room...

What it does really impede is evaluating a collection, for example in pre-auction viewing, since you can't easily check the gum. Which depending on the auction, quality of collection and how many bidders do in-person evaluation may or may not be a factor in realizations.
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Posted 11/25/2021   12:23 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add canyoneer to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I would agree that a vast percentage of collections in albums purchased are for the stamps themselves not the presentation. The albums/binders are either tossed or resold. The exception would be a person just starting that is looking for an album also. As a collector, it makes sense to just set up your presentation to what appeals to you. I personally like Scott National Album pages with black mounts. Makes it easy to take stamps out and look at every once in a while while the black background shows off the perfs.

BTW - nice #523 in your collection! That's one on my bucket list.
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Posted 11/25/2021   3:02 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
For an average collection it does not matter to me other than I will bump down what I am willing to pay for it. For a collection full of medium and high values I would not much care except if the viewing would be really difficult. It might make me pass if their are other good collections that are easy to review.

I look at mounts the same way. A top loading hingeless album or an album using Hawid's is a breeze to check stamps in. The split backs add work and add to the possibility of damaging something.

I have purchased large lots that had really good material in albums and the reason the albums were in a big lot was crystal mounts and the labor involved in unlocking the stamps. Yikes.

Don's point about environmental concerns is spot on. You want the pages and stamps to "breathe". Sleeves will only cause even more harm if the environment is humid. The moisture will become trapped.
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Posted 11/28/2021   06:43 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add BFRomeos to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
There's a clear consensus here that eschews use of clear plastic page protectors for maintenance of a stamp collection. Among the reasons is the potential for acidification. How does that reconcile with the widespread reliance on "dealer cards," which presumably present the same problem?

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Posted 11/28/2021   07:00 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add angore to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Almost any method of storing stamps can be adversely affected by environmental conditions. I use protective sleeves and Vario one and two pocket pages that someone could call protective sleeves. Glassines degrade over time but see no concern about them.

The original question prompts me to wonder how one can check a hinged collection. The hinges can hide thins, etc. Most methods allow a quick visual of the front.



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Al
Edited by angore - 11/28/2021 07:05 am
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Posted 11/28/2021   07:50 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add gmot to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
One difference between dealer cards and plastic page protectors is that the backside of the dealer card is paper, and thus allows the stamp to "breath".
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Posted 11/28/2021   09:03 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Made of acid-free card stock and printed with crisp, non-smear ink they are an ideal way to store and present stamp inventory. The crystal clear film pocket holding the stamp is archival quality.


Whether you agree or not, the card manufacturers claim the same material qualities as the album manufacturers.
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Posted 11/28/2021   10:07 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add floortrader to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Maybe a few people are upset with my answer ......But you have to remember I am a old school stamp dealer ,that means way before eBay came around .

Dealers back in the 1970's ,1980's and 1990's ,didn't want to carry 100 lbs of albums and binders from stamp show to stamp show, they were low profit items for the weight and boxes just crowned the table and the weight was too much to handle .......so dealers didn't want bulk lots ....again a low profit item .

Dealers just never wanted those heavy auction lots ....that is why when I won in a bid 2 out of the 6 lots up for auction the auction firms actually thrown in the other lots for free .Nobody wanted them. As for me I just cut up the pages to sort of fill out the mixture box .
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Posted 11/28/2021   10:30 am  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Sheet protectors are not an archival panacea; they do not eliminate archival issues, add cost, and in some cases can increase problems. The sad truth is that paper/stamps are pretty unstable and ultimately will all degrade into dust. Paper conservation is about trying to fend off or delay the inevitable. As good stewards of the material we own, the obligation is to slow the breakdown of paper.

In my opinion the best conservation measure we can take is control the environment. Sheet protectors will not help with a poor environmental and in all probability increase degradation. In a good environment they help only by preventing mechanical damage (page turning, perfs 'fighting' with each other on facing page, etc.). Is the money spent of sheet protectors worth reducing the risk of mechanical damage and increasing the potential risk of rapid degradation if the environmental conditions are poor? The answer from libraries, museums, and the archival community is 'no'.

The second thing that collectors should be doing (beyond environmental control) is to occasionally test for acidification. It is cheap, easy and gives you an additional reason to look closer at your storage solution on a periodic basis.

Why is our hobby so slack about acidification testing? Do we just want to look the other way? Do philatelic suppliers not want to us to know that they are using the term 'acid free' when it is just marketing puffery? Why would we wait around until our stamps, covers, and paper reference materials are already showing signs of acidification (when it is too late to do much about it)?

Buy a paper testing pen, replace it once a year (annual cost <$10), and test everything that is around your philatelic shelves. Album pages, album covers, album spacers, slipcases, boxes, 102 cards, glassines, hinges and mounts are all candidates for testing. The added benefit is that testing schedule forces us into taking a closer look at our material every year.
Don
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Posted 11/28/2021   6:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tsmatx to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:

These buyers give absolutely nothing for the album meaning the binder, nice printed pages and protective plastic . All that most likely ends in the trash and the stamps removed .


I wanted to poke at this a little bit, since this statement surprised me a little bit, but nobody seemed to disagree, I am newcomer to the hobby and trying to understand supply chain and economics.

I can understand this might be true for more expensive albums (like maybe $2,500 & up) probably majority of the value is in a small fraction of the stamps. You can extract those and perhaps sell what's left as remainder album or (for case of WW albums) break it up as country collections.

when you see albums selling various price points in auctions (such as mentioned Kelleher where there are 20-40 albums in one lot), I thought most of those were destined for eBay (or other retail outlets) and selling by album, the albums that go into these lots were not strong enough to be in their own lot (or a smaller lot) -- so do people really break these lots up all the way down to individual stamps? That seems like an absolutely humongous amount of work and simply not economically viable. And probably 90% of stamps are not worth anything individually so do they just get trashed?

Final point I wanted to make is that new albums are pretty expensive nowadays, and also relatively hard to obtain--on Amos, most Specialty albums are $500 or more, and are printed on demand so you may have to wait months for it to arrive. Scott International volume 1 is almost $1,000. You can easily buy an old version which has thousands of stamps already (saving lots of work) for a fraction of that.
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