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Jamaican Philatelic Mystery

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362 Posts
Posted 06/16/2022   8:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampGuy64 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
There I was hoping that the ink manufacturing had been fine-tuned, by the 1880s.

These, from 1911, were easy enough, for me, but others seem to still be having difficulties, when I was ordering and sorting through them...

Incidentally, Scott lists two shades for that issue: yellow-bister, and bister, and seemingly disinterestedly.
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Posted 06/16/2022   9:40 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampGuy64 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
There does seem to be the preference for one shade, and due to its attractiveness, there's that frivolous perhaps, yet it was just as prolific a release as the other shade; or was it?

Among the Victorian Jamaican issues, the 4d brown shades of orange of 1860 and 1872 are the "cookies", higher-priced. But the opposite is true, according to Stanley Gibbons, for the 4d shades of 1883. Therefore, do I dare think that that has more to do with the rarity, the scarcity, of a shade.

Incidentally, there were no red-brown issues of the 4d before 1883, and that very thing has added further to the confusion.
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Posted 06/16/2022   10:35 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampGuy64 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
This was advertised as a brown-orange, but no excuse for the vendor as Scott lists the shade, along with the red-orange...

It's pale, paler than than the ghosts that dwell within its fibres. I call it, "palest peach". I wasn't expecting much before it arrived, and that was clearly evident once it did. Might have had it been a brown-orange, when fresh, new, and young? Unfortunately, my memory. let alone my frame, can't take me back that far, certainly not with that one.

Looking at the backside, at the lower-right corner, we see an owner's mark, in ink. I tried to remove it, and failed miserably. If you look closely at the lower-left corner, at the front of the stamp, you can see the purplish ink peeking out...

There must be some who collect owner's marks on the older issues, but I'm not one of them.
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Edited by StampGuy64 - 06/16/2022 10:36 pm
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Posted 06/17/2022   09:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add KGVIStamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
When you see color shades listed in the Stanley Gibbons Catalogue, they are typically the result of an additional printing. The editor decides what to call the color of the initial issue and adds color shades that are significant if new printings are released. So in addition to color variation you might also see differences in the paper as well as the gum and sometimes also the perforations. It does help if you compare all these factors.

This color comparison is a lot harder for used stamps and they also are subjected to the elements and the effects of how they were soaked from the envelope. Some of these can change the color dramatically. They are called changelings.

So it is a lot harder to make an accurate decision about used stamps.
I do also find that if you have a number of copies it is easier to see the variations and to identify any changelings that might be there.

Shown below is an example of two stamps that were printed one day apart that have significant variations in the color but are still listed as the same stamp by every catalog. So even though the catalog indicates the colors are "Black & Violet" you might have trouble accurately identifying the Grey-Black version of this stamp if you did not know there were two options. Both are Perf 13.5 and were the result of the production running into the second day and it appears they mixed the ink the second day resulting in the variation.

These are fairly common stamps and both color variations can be found pretty easily if you have a few stamps to sort.
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Learn more about King George VI stamps at www.KGVIStamps.com
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Posted 06/17/2022   10:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampGuy64 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, I have heard of changelings. I've seen images of them, online, in the past. I may have a few myself, perhaps, especially those faded. This one is a changeling, now...



Such a nice postmark, and I do have that at least, still.

I do like the Commonwealth issues during George VI's era, the local scenes depicted specifically. When I went to find similar of his father's, George V, there were not nearly as many from which to choose, and I do prefer those. Unfortunately, they were issued rather late in his 25-year reign. making it difficult, for me, to find them postmarked prior to his passing; just prior to even.

Incidentally, this one is reminding of the "Old West", "YeeeHaaa", here in the U.S, yet was used thousands of miles away...



I got only that one, as the only differences are the colours throughout the set, rather than the scenes.

The ole boy appears as a cattle baron, eh?
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Edited by StampGuy64 - 06/17/2022 11:01 pm
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Posted 06/17/2022   11:29 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add floortrader to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Better scan of the colors . The original poster is showing three stamps that look more like a Chocolate color but lists them as red-orange ,red-brown and orange-brown , this scan shows the colors of red and orange better .

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Edited by floortrader - 06/17/2022 11:50 pm
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Posted 06/18/2022   12:55 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampGuy64 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
These are the original scans, sharpened only, from a CanoScan 8400f, and from the Windows XP era...



Within your scan, I believe that that's an SG #11a, there in the center, rather than an SG #22, due to its older, alpha-numeric handstamp, "A01", Kingston. The left and right specimens look to be of 1883, like my own.
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Posted 06/18/2022   02:24 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampGuy64 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Well, that was fast, lightning-fast, and from Florida, yet the seller is listed as being from New York; no rhyme nor reason. It was advertised as a Jamaica Scott #22a, and the one I had been waiting on, its having arrived yesterday. The seller's image...

My processed scan...

Its watermark was difficult to detect, but there's the "A" and the oval of the crown...

With the original, suspect, trio...


I can increase the saturation of the colours(+35), the brightness(+30), and the contrast to half of that of the latter(+15)...


The red-orange of 1872, compared with the ??? of 1883...


You be the judge. Don't mind me. I'm not going to swear to anything.

As an aside, I made a snip of the original trio, and with the magnification diminished(1:2). Note the one at far left, the clean one, the one I thought to be a red-orange. I'm still not certain, yet it is as though she's blushing, then winking, and in a soft whisper she states, "I am a red-orange, yet mint-like"...

That one...^...is a pickle and a half.
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Edited by StampGuy64 - 06/18/2022 6:59 pm
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Posted 06/18/2022   03:22 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampGuy64 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

At Big Al's ice cream parlour, there's only one flavour.

Incidentally, I ran my paint-program's colour-dropper over the printing-ink of the stamp, and for the text.
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Posted 06/18/2022   07:36 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rogdcam to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
If you really want to get a sense of how complex early stamp color is these articles are must reading:

https://repository.si.edu/bitstream...metry_1_.pdf
https://www.analyticalphilately.org...t_Report.pdf
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Posted 06/18/2022   08:23 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add floortrader to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
As a worldwide collector ,my rule has been to mount the various shades next to each other . There is just no way I can buy and keep some 200 different country specialise catalogs with the many specialised written reports, pamplets/booklets . Mount them across the pages and then move on .

I leave it to a future collector to figure them out . One of my pet peeves is the many collectors who overlap their mounted stamps ,then your left trying to figure out if it this a storage place for duplicates, or did they find different shades or perforations or watermarks and were too lazy to add a pencil note to explain what their doing .
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Posted 06/18/2022   09:32 am  Show Profile Check GeoffHa's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add GeoffHa to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Agree, although I mount shades either on a stock-page or on a blank leaf within the album. This also reflects the fact that, unless they're very obvious, distinguishing shades isn't one of my few skills.
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Posted 06/18/2022   09:36 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Wilding mad to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
When it comes to a variation in shades the light used that is reflected from the surface of the stamps maybe different and can therefore be deceptive.

Taking a picture or image can also be confusing, here are three images of the same stamp taken, using different adjustments on the camera.

The more correct method is to put the stamps together for comparison to get the best results, but even then, the camera may not pick up the true difference of shade.
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Posted 06/18/2022   6:49 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add StampGuy64 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I can't help but think, dare I, that perhaps the inkers at De La Rue took the bright red-orange of 1872, and added a bit of grey, to dull it somewhat, and for the 4d of 1883. I wouldn't be surprised, but those good fellows are no longer with us, and cannot testify as to the event. That has been done with other colonial issues, most definitely...

Of this 1884 2.5d pair of the Bahamas, one was advertised as being of the regular fare, and the other being the dulled variant(at right)...

...but I have my doubts, particularly there at its upper-left corner. In any event, I wasn't after the alleged dull one, but the one at left rather, the postmark specifically, so much so that the value, condition and colour meant nothing. But in the end, I had to take the other, paler one, regrettably.

Ah, the Bahamas; not much was mailed from there, back in the day, not much of anything to require the 6d fee anyway. Nonetheless, I managed to get a used one; that is, seemingly, genuinely used...

Take a gander at this one, and where someone had used a mint 6d(commonplace), and in 1941...

I wanted it, yes, but not for their asking-price. A clever attempt to generate a used example, but alas, no "cookie"; or, did the individual simply use it as a spare? Apparently it was still valid in 1941.

I spoke to a seller in the UK, and they related that the only used 6d copies that they had recently seen were postmarked in...Antigua.

"Oh, that's allright, as long as it was actually used!" Thank you, no.

Then, I have this one as well, fiscally-used, a "SAWYER"...
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Posted 06/23/2022   01:54 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Wilding mad to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Here's what "Hobbizine" had to say on the subject of differentiating the many variations of stamp colours found.

http://www.hobbizine.com/page0039.html
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