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An Example Of Aniline Ink

 
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Posted 05/22/2010   09:50 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add plsllvn to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
These were apparently caused by ink bleeding through during soaking (I did manage to find an excerpt from an old book indicating that aniline ink was thought to have been used for this stamp)so I thought it may be of use to members who may have not seen/know the difference.
Paul


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Posted 05/22/2010   9:25 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Looks a little like cancelling ink oil vehicle bleeding through, John, that being said, I do not recall many Aussie stamps suffering this fate,
possible to look at the face?
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Edited by rod222 - 05/22/2010 9:26 pm
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Posted 05/23/2010   01:41 am  Show Profile Check KGV Collector's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add KGV Collector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply


Rod the front of the KGV stamp posted with bleeding on back of!

All my KGVs are under decimal stamps at the minuet.
I know shades do not show up very well on line but I
have an example of the deepest Aniline shade I have ever seen!

I will post it one day. I put it away years ago because
it stands out so much!
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Posted 05/23/2010   02:35 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Yes, well I have to agree with you John,
As you say, the cancellation ink has drawn the aniline through.

Interestingly in 1856 an Englishman, experimenting
with coal tar, found the first aniline dye.
His name was Perkins, I wonder if this was the partner
of Perkins Bacon the stamp printers.

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Posted 05/23/2010   03:27 am  Show Profile Check KGV Collector's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add KGV Collector to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I just love the coal tar information. I had no idea how this ink was made. Thanks to all. John
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Posted 06/06/2010   3:26 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add BeeSee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have this Canada 3c Small Queen that appears to be analine ink. I think it is Scott/Unitrade 41, but analine varieties are not mentioned. I can never distinguish the different printings. I wonder why they are given major numbers anyway (like 37 and 41).

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BeeSee in BC
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Posted 06/06/2010   8:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have read occaisions such as yours BeeSee, go towards
identifying a certain type of stamp paper, when the image can be seen
from the back, but I am not certain that it applies here or not.
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Posted 06/18/2010   6:59 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Illustrating the blessings of the world wide web,
Mr. J E Toy of Fiji
would have had to wait probably 3 months for a reply
to his query in June 1936

zzzzzzzzz



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Posted 11/05/2012   3:53 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jimjamtwo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I hope it's OK to revive this 2010 thread! I'm also wondering how to identify aniline ink stamps. Is a UV reaction a way to do this? I have about a hundred 10pf Bavarian red stamps (from the late 19th century) and under UV only one of the stamps had a strong reaction. It glowed bright orange. I think I read somewhere that aniline stamps were the first to have UV reactions. Does this mean that it's aniline?

I should mention that the Michel specialised catalogue does list an aniline variety for this stamp, but it's described in terms of its shade, not UV reaction.
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Posted 11/05/2012   7:46 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I have read that aniline flouresces, but not seen it myself.
In general it is named and recognised by its general colour
and properties that include it breaking down easily when wetted.
It was used to prevent forgeries and removal of postmarks.
sometimes "bleeds" through to the back of the stamp
deep purple in colour.
KG6 Malay States are a prime example.


Quote:
I hope it's OK to revive this 2010 thread


That's what one is SUPPOSED to do
it builds as a reference source for those that come after.

10 points to you for doing this.
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Edited by rod222 - 11/05/2012 7:48 pm
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Posted 11/06/2012   7:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jimjamtwo to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks for the comment, rod222!

BTW, I have established that my stamp in an eosin (not aniline) shade. It's Michel# 49b.
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Posted 11/07/2012   08:22 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add I_Love_Stamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
This thread has fascinated me recently on the subject of inks. Also reminded me of a few beautiful New Zealand stamps (pictured earlier) that I recently got in a recent acquisition and noticed rather quickly that besides the different perforation counts there seem to be different dies used as well. Some differences are rather subtle and others are very noticeable (see globe) as some seem "muddy looking" and others very sharp appearing. Any info on this would be greatly appreciated.

Are all these Aniline as well or do you need a back scan?



This one is absolutely gorgeous to me.
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Edited by I_Love_Stamps - 11/07/2012 08:28 am
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Posted 11/07/2012   10:33 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Ryan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Also reminded me of a few beautiful New Zealand stamps (pictured earlier) that I recently got in a recent acquisition and noticed rather quickly that besides the different perforation counts there seem to be different dies used as well. Some differences are rather subtle and others are very noticeable (see globe) as some seem "muddy looking" and others very sharp appearing. Any info on this would be greatly appreciated.

Try this link for info on the New Zealand Penny Universal and Penny Dominion stamps.

http://www.stamps4u.co.nz/

Ryan
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Posted 11/07/2012   2:14 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add I_Love_Stamps to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Awesome! Also the large single was a WMK 61 perf 14 ~ Scott #108
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Posted 03/12/2015   10:28 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Jenny2U to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Dragging up this 5 year old thread thanks to Google

This looks to me to be an example of aniline ink. Or did the ink bleed during soaking?

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