Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Thousands of stamps, consistently graded, competitively priced and hundreds of in-depth blog posts to read
Stamp Community Forum
 
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

This page may contain links that result in small commissions to keep this free site up and running.
Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Australian Coil Testers

 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous TopicReplies: 7 / Views: 302Next Topic  
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
1658 Posts
Posted 07/23/2023   4:31 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add Rob041256 to your friends list Get a Link to this Message
QUEEN VICTORIA COIL TESTERS:
Considered the first coil dispensing machine tester, the Queen Victoria 1d red tester pair was sent to Dickie and Brown for testing in dispensing machines.
R.J. Dickie a Wellington (NZ) mail clerk, first proposed coil vending of stamps in 1905. In association with local engineers J.H. Brown and N. Andrews, he devised a successful coin operated stamp dispenser which, in association with Kermode Co (UK) was remodelled in October 1907 and used to test Victorian rolls of invalidated coils consigned to New Zealand by the Australian PMG Department.
These stamps were overprinted with two 4.5mm black thick horizontal bars and used as trial labels; thus becoming Australia's first coil testing strips. The two barred QV coil pairs were part of the original strips that were sent to Dickie and Brown.
The Postmaster General's Department in Australia got the Stamp Printer in Melbourne to overprint 500 sheets of the Victoria 1d "Naish" design stamps, overprinting the stamps with the double bars to deface them voiding the stamps from being postally used.
Robert James Dickie was born in London in 1876 and immigrated with his family to Wellington, New Zealand when he was 12. At 15 in 1891 Dickie joined the staff of the Chief Post Office at Customs Street West in the Auckland CBD.
It was here in 1905 at age 29 he sought the assistance of Wellington photographer and draughtsman J.H. Brown who made accurate drawings from Dickie's ideas. Later both men enlisted engineer W. Andrews to build the first model. Dickie, Brown and Andrews were the patentees of the vending machine.
Dickie sought the assistance of Wellington photographer and draughtsman JH Brown who made accurate drawings from Dickie's ideas. Later they enlisted engineer W Andrews to build the first model. Dickie, Brown and Andrews were the first patentees of the vending machine.

KING GEORGE VI & QUEEN ELIZABETH:
For testing and adjusting coil vending machines, the Note Printing Branch prepared a special plate of coil testers. The stamp design was a simple horizontally-lined recess-printed blank.
The first printing was made in 1937 in red, but from 1938 the colour was changed to green (Red King George VI and Green Queen Elizabeth). Both testers show the uniformly large holes perforation and are on Multiple Crown and C of A watermark paper; the perforation of both testers is Die I and perforation 13 x 14.
Strips exist showing joins every 10th stamp or every 20th stamps. Only 960 coils were produced with the coil starter. These coils were introduced about October 1941. A single 1938 2d stamp in mauve shows a coil perforation.

QUEEN ELIZABETH II:
Coil of 960 with special large and small holes perforation were first placed on sale at the same time as sheet stamps on June 30, 1965. These coils were made up from ordinary sheets and showed joins after every 10th stamp.
Coils were only made up from sheets printed with helecon in pink ink. The starter strip used was the same as that for the 1959 5d coil, with printing in blue on white reading "960 5d STAMPS/VALUE 20", and additionally inscribed in manuscript in red. A total of 540 coils of 960 (=518,400 stamps) were distributed by the Note Printing Branch.
A photogravure coil starter was prepared for testing machines. This has a plain black background with P.M.G./DEPT." in two lines in white letters, and is found in two shades, the other shade is grey-black (not yet part of the collection).


Send note to Staff
Edited by Rob041256 - 07/23/2023 4:32 pm

Pillar Of The Community
United States
8537 Posts
Posted 07/23/2023   4:37 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Rob, since my Australian is not very good, what is a tester? Is it the same as a dispenser?


Peter
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
Learn More...
United States
196 Posts
Posted 07/23/2023   5:44 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add ZebraMan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
From the OP, I believe he is describing test stamps that are used "For testing and adjusting coil vending machines". The blank stamps in the middle for example, they have no denomination or design, they are printed for the sole purpose of testing the vending machines without having to waste actual postage.


edit: typo.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by ZebraMan - 07/23/2023 5:45 pm
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
1658 Posts
Posted 07/23/2023   5:58 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Rob041256 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Petert4522

I was about to reply when Zebra responded, his comment is exactly what the testers were used for. The Queen Victoria and KGVI testers are rare.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
8537 Posts
Posted 07/23/2023   9:20 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Petert4522 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks guys! I had a senior moment. Happens often lately,


Peter
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by Petert4522 - 07/23/2023 9:22 pm
Valued Member
Australia
55 Posts
Posted 07/24/2023   04:23 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Black Swan to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The "tester" is used to ensure the dispenser is properly aligned. Rather than ruin good stamps the "tester" coil is disposable and, accordingly, it doesn't matter much if it's damaged.

On the other hand, if the dispenser is misaligned then you get a result like this:



You can see the damage where the dispenser is half a stamp out in its timing.

Interestingly, you can also see the "grabber" marks either side of the King's ears. That also needs to be adjusted to get the pressure right.

This example is of sheet stamps being joined to form a coil strip. Use of a "tester" would have prevented this damage.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by Black Swan - 07/24/2023 04:28 am
Pillar Of The Community
Australia
1658 Posts
Posted 07/24/2023   07:04 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Rob041256 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Hi Black Swan

Excellent example why a tester is important.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
Learn More...
United States
244 Posts
Posted 09/18/2023   7:55 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add BobInRye to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Did Australia product horizontal coils using the same perforation technique?
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
  Previous TopicReplies: 7 / Views: 302Next Topic  
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.


Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2023 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2007 - 2023 Stamp Community Forums
It took 0.09 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05