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Great Penny Red Find On Ebay

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Pillar Of The Community
Australia
1996 Posts
Posted 09/25/2010   02:30 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jubilee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
For the sake of further understanding of the Penny "RED", here's two examples I have. The one on the left can probably be called a Red, but what of the other one? Gibbons notes many shades, and lists a handful, but there's no mention of a chocolate brown!


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Pillar Of The Community
Australia
3547 Posts
Posted 09/25/2010   02:39 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add tonymacg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Oxidised?
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Posted 09/25/2010   03:03 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

or..general heading "chemical or light damage"

15 = Scotland Postmark "Ardrosaan"




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Rest in Peace
Canada
6750 Posts
Posted 09/25/2010   03:18 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Puzzler to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Does hudrogen peroxide work on the oxidation (sulfidation) of penny reds?
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Posted 09/25/2010   03:58 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Depends on the 1d red being subject to sulphide blackening
if the ink contained the necessary ingredients
to provide blackening,otherwise, you may do more harm than good.
Depends what pigments were involved in the penny red.

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Posted 09/25/2010   04:22 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

I could find no evidence in my literature,
regarding Perkins Bacon and Petch, printers of the 1d red

But perhaps we can <guess> the colour included "flake white"
from their recipe for other early stamps.

From "postage stamps in the making" Easton

Pigments used by Perkins Bacon

There was no colorimeter available in the early days when Perkins Bacon began to print the stamps of Great
Britain. They were their own inkmakers and, although undoubtedly scientifically-minded, they had no staff of
chemists to fall back upon. The recipes that they used for ordinary colours are given in the invoice which they sent
to New South Wales with the plates for the One Penny, Twopence and Threepence of the beautiful diadem issues
of 1856:

One Penny: Scarlet Lake, 4 parts; Chinese Vermilion, 2 parts;
Flake White, 1 part.

Twopence: Ultramarine, 9 parts; Chinese Blue, 1 part; Flake
White, 2 parts.

Threepence: Mineral Green, 6 parts; Crystal Green, 2 parts;
Flake White, I part.

It should be noted that Flake White is a carbonate of lead, and that its presence made the ink liable to sulphuretting,
due to the action of sulphur, in the form of sulphuretted hydrogen, on pigments containing lead or copper. The
Threepence would be specially liable to this disfigurement, because Mineral Green is a hydrated basic copper
carbonate.


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Posted 09/25/2010   04:27 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
"Flake White"

From Tony Robinson's "worst jobs in history"

Lead Whiter:

Making white paint in the 17th Century was so fun, they only allowed women to do it. Just climb to the top of a 40 foot tall vat of horse manure and urine, and retrieve lead sheets that have been sitting in there for months. Scrape the flakes of oxidized lead powder off the sheets, and use them to make paint.

The job's benefits? Low pay and lead poisoning, the latter of which promotes paralysis, madness and death.
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Edited by rod222 - 09/25/2010 04:28 am
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Canada
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Posted 09/25/2010   10:57 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add BeeSee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Amazing Rodster info again!!
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BeeSee in BC
"The Postmark is Mightier than the Stamp"
http://brcstamps.com ---- BNAPS, RPSC, APS
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Posted 09/25/2010   11:27 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add rod222 to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thanks BeeSee, inspired by people as your good self :)
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Canada
6750 Posts
Posted 09/26/2010   8:22 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Puzzler to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thank You Rod.
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