Stamp Community Family of Web Sites
Stamp Community Forum
Username:
Password:
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

Welcome Guest! Need help? Got a question? Inherit some stamps?
Our stamp forum is completely free! Register Now!

Raised lettering on a stamp - 101  
 

Next Page    
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
Author Previous Topic Topic Next Topic
Page: of 2
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
5310 Posts
Posted 10/12/2017   11:20 am  Show Profile Bookmark this topic Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Message
Hi
just thought I would bring up a subject that many stamp collectors ignore or don't realize exists...RAISED LETTERING ON STAMPS.

The definition of raised lettering is as follows...
"Raised lettering is done through a special technique used by off-set printers. They apply a Thermographic powder to wet ink on a stamp sheet and they react to each other causing the bubble effect"

While I was in high school in printing class, I did this many times on business cards, wedding cards, etc...The technique is exactly the same for stamps.

Immediately after the stamp sheet has been printed and before it lands on the previous sheet a nozzle spray a very fine dark power on the printed area...It reacts immediately to the chemical and bubbles up to form raised lettering.

You can feel the deference and see it also..One easy way to tell if it have been raised is to look for small pot holes on a letter which was a bubble that burst and became concave.

Below is a random stamp I used to show the raised letter effect. look at this Newfoundland Scott 156..



Below is a close up of the same stamp...The left brown line is the exact same colour as the left red arrow is pointing to..The difference in colour is caused by the powder reacting to wet ink.

The 5 brown arrows in the middle shows the highlights of he raised lettering (tops of the lettering)..The far right red arrow shows again the original colour printed as shown by the picture below.



Now having said that, here is a shocker for you.. My printing experience tells me that this stamp and other were sent trough the printing press twice...The lettering to be raised was printed first to get the raised lettering affect...Then ran trough the presses again to finish the rest of the stamp...The reason I know this to be true is it is impossible (IMPOSSIBLE) to achieve an exacting fine spray to get this wanted affect on such tiny areas...It looks like two different colours on this stamp, BUT they are exactly the same, just one is chemically affected.

Hope it sheds a bit of light on a print effect that has been lost over time

Robert
Send note to Staff

Valued Member
Canada
75 Posts
Posted 10/12/2017   4:00 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add pwscg to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Robert,

Excellent discourse! How about submitting this as an article to the Canadian Philatelist or BNA Topics? I'm sure a lot of people would appreciate the information.

Peter
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1298 Posts
Posted 10/12/2017   4:30 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add bookbndrbob to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
You could have fooled me. I thought this was an ordinary, engraved stamp where the paper was pushed into the recessed areas to pick up the ink, thus giving it a raised effect.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Edited by bookbndrbob - 10/12/2017 4:31 pm
Moderator
Learn More...
4394 Posts
Posted 10/12/2017   4:47 pm  Show Profile Check 51studebaker's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add 51studebaker to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
The equipment to do this appears to be quite rare in this time period, would they have purchased and used such 'bleeding edge' materials and equipment when printing stamps?
http://thermographic-equipment.com/...ic-printing/
Don
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
5310 Posts
Posted 10/12/2017   6:54 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
he equipment to do this appears to be quite rare in this time period,


Don..I was trained on old to new equipment
HEIDELBERG PRESS..This press used the powdered spray for raised lettering.



LINOTYPE MACHINE



AND FINALLY THE A.B.DICK 360 PRESS



And yes I have kept old cards from the 1800's from my printing class that had raised lettering.

Robert
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
Canada
5688 Posts
Posted 10/12/2017   7:14 pm  Show Profile Check BeeSee's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add BeeSee to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Robert, I would be REALLY surprised if that Newfoundland stamp was sent through the press twice. It is listed as a single color dark blue in Scott/Unitrade.

If there were two passes, then there is bound to be easily distinguishable shifting on different stamps.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
BeeSee in BC
"The Postmark is Mightier than the Stamp"
http://brcstamps.com ---- BNAPS, RPSC, APS
Pillar Of The Community
2543 Posts
Posted 10/12/2017   10:08 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add jogil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
I agree with Bookbndrbob regarding engraved stamps.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
5310 Posts
Posted 10/13/2017   08:53 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Ok, the printing company was Thomas De La Rue & Company

In 1855, the British Post Office awarded a contract for the firm to print postage stamps, using the relief printing process...So the process has been around for many, many years.

The company printed stamps for Newfoundland (more than 50 postage stamp issues), and several countries, namely Australia, Belgium, Bermuda, Egypt, Hong Kong, India, Ireland, New Zealand, Portugal, Swaziland, Trinidad, the United States.

Now on the older Platinum Presses the whole stamp was run through to create a proof as to allow the proof reader (that is what they called a person to read, except or deny stamp production)...The whole stamp process is locked in the top part of a Platinum Press and the sheets were fed into the lower part of the press...it is very EASY to remove the rest of the stamp except the word "NEWFOUNDLAND because of lockable wedges..That would leave the single word in exact alignment for a second run for Thermographic powder application.

Hey guys, just trying to use common sense using my old printer skills...And if anyone out there knows how a printer/printer process can apply Thermographic powder to such a small area that NEWFOUNDLAND occupies on a stamp without affecting the ink on the rest of the stamp, I will apologize and end this post..

Thanks for any input guys.

Robert

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
665 Posts
Posted 10/13/2017   11:48 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add txstamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Interesting.
Is there any documentation from post office records on how they did this?
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Learn More...
5310 Posts
Posted 10/13/2017   12:18 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add wert to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply

Quote:
Is there any documentation from post office records on how they did this?


txstamp..Don't have the slightest clue where to begin to get information archives from the post office.

Robert
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
1298 Posts
Posted 10/13/2017   1:11 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add bookbndrbob to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Print is naturally raised above the paper surface through the intaglio printing process. The most likely reason for a change in color in a printed area is that the ink has oxidized in that place.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Canada
1145 Posts
Posted 10/14/2017   7:41 pm  Show Profile Check CanadaStamp's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add CanadaStamp to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Wert - Canada Post is not a source for much in the way of stamp production technical information. You need to go to the National Archives - where you can see such things as proofs and printing contracts / specs, or the manufacturers who would surely have such records. As for the latter though I doubt very much they have an interest in answering philatelic questions.
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Valued Member
Canada
289 Posts
Posted 10/19/2017   12:51 pm  Show Profile Check gportch's eBay Listings Bookmark this reply Add gportch to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thermography has not been used for any stamp issued in Canada or British North America. It simply is not a practical or suitable process for any security printing.

The stamp in question in this discussion is an intaglio printing from steel plates.

GJP
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Netherlands
577 Posts
Posted 10/19/2017   4:49 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Galeoptix to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Thermography has been used for the first time - as far as postage stamps goes - for as Turkish stamp in the 1960-ies!
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
Netherlands
577 Posts
Posted 11/01/2017   08:49 am  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add Galeoptix to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply




The black lettering has thermography!
Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Pillar Of The Community
United States
692 Posts
Posted 11/01/2017   2:09 pm  Show Profile Bookmark this reply Add hy-brasil to your friends list  Get a Link to this Reply
Galeoptix, most assuredly, the black in the Rural Electrification stamp is not engraved. You apparently have never seen thermograving?

And I believe the process is thermograving or thermo gravure, not thermography. Thermography is a heat picture; look it up.

While rounded edges is a characteristic of thermograving, it is also a feature of engraving plates made by chemical etching.

This is from a model railroad parts details fret made of brass. This has been chemically etched, as that is the best cheapest method for smaller quantity runs in that hobby. The brass surface has been polished/cleaned where the inside of the cuts are still oxidized. Hand or machine engraving would not produce this. Note the rounded cutting. So an engraving plate could easily create printing with rounded edges.

Thermograving is as wert noted, a powder process. The granules are spread out by the sprayer and expand on contact with the ink, they just don't sit on top of the printed ink. The surface created is never perfectly flat if seen under magnification and is typically mottled slightly, often with imperfect edges.

Send note to Staff  Go to Top of Page
Stamp Smarter's 20th Century US Fancy Cancel database:
http://www.stampsmarter.com/feature...rn_Home.html
Edited by hy-brasil - 11/01/2017 2:42 pm
Page: of 2 Previous Topic Topic Next Topic  
Next Page
 
To participate in the forum you must log in or register.
United States Postal Service, Now on eBay!United States Postal Service, Now on eBay!
New Forum TopicsRecently Active Forum Topics
  Afinsa gets sentenced
  This cover is making me nuts
  How much do you have albums for yours postal stamps?
  1870 6c Abraham Lincoln no Grill.
  Multiple modern post stamps on envelope?
  Definitely a 594, not sure if I have a 596
  Stamp Identification
  not too fancy? looking for a crash course in cancellations please advise
  Another book ! Anyone have it ? About bc and vancouver island
  Aussie Digger 1917 Mail Home
  The vagaries of eBay...can't be explained
  Can you precisely identify this 15c Webster without seeing the real stamp, please?
  Two More Anthony's Gems
  A Bluish Paper 361 From Anthony's
  Anthony's Particularly Ridiculous 317
  Great Britain Mulready-like envelopes
  NFLD Scott 262 - "Rock on ice" variety
  What are these artworks of proposed stamps? Essays? copies? reprints??
  Romania - WWI German Occupation - Unknown Stamp
  Help Identify Australian Postage Due Variety?
  Scott 41 - "bruise on neck"
  Error Perforation Stamps Yes or No?
  Stamp Community Family Logo link
  Old Stamps but Really New
  My UK postal stamps collection.

  This cover is making me nuts
  How much do you have albums for yours postal stamps?
  Two More Anthony's Gems
  Anthony's Particularly Ridiculous 317
  Can you precisely identify this 15c Webster without seeing the real stamp, please?
  Afinsa gets sentenced
  Another book ! Anyone have it ? About bc and vancouver island
  Do youngsters collect stamps today ?
  New Important News Information on Canada Scott/Unitrade 195d
  1870 6c Abraham Lincoln no Grill.
  Definitely a 594, not sure if I have a 596
  A Bluish Paper 361 From Anthony's
  The vagaries of eBay...can't be explained
  Selection Stamps~and you thought gum was tacky.
  Multiple modern post stamps on envelope?
  Cravat on postal stamps
  Aussie Digger 1917 Mail Home
  Thematic : Umbrellas on Stamps.
  not too fancy? looking for a crash course in cancellations please advise
  Stamps of the Olympics Games through the centuries
  Stamp Identification
  Lets see your Aviation Stamps
  Show us SNOW on stamps!
  Transportation Coil caboose 1905 Trying to understand Untagged variation
  perf 11 us franklin/washington coils

Go to Top of Page
Disclaimer: While a tremendous amount of effort goes into ensuring the accuracy of the information contained in this site, Stamp Community assumes no liability for errors. Copyright 2005 - 2018 Stamp Community Family - All rights reserved worldwide. Use of any images or content on this website without prior written permission of Stamp Community or the original lender is strictly prohibited.
Privacy Policy / Terms of Use    Advertise Here
Stamp Community Forum © 2005 - 2018 Coin Community Forums
It took 1.08 seconds to lick this stamp. Powered By: Snitz Forums 2000 Version 3.4.05